References of "Lins, Laurence"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
See detailSurfactin: a receptor-independent bacterial elicitor of plant immunity?
Luzuriaga Loaiza, Walter ULg; Legras, Aurelien; Crowet, Jean-Marc ULg et al

Scientific conference (2015, May 13)

Detailed reference viewed: 25 (3 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailInteractions of natural rhamnolpids produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa with plant model membranes
Polo Lozano, Damien ULg; Nasir, Mehmet Nail ULg; Deleu, Magali ULg et al

Poster (2015, January 30)

It is well known that chemical pesticides have harmful effects on human health and environment. In this context, the interest for alternative products such as biopesticides is increasing. Among them ... [more ▼]

It is well known that chemical pesticides have harmful effects on human health and environment. In this context, the interest for alternative products such as biopesticides is increasing. Among them, elicitors act on the plants by inducing systemic resistance against diseases caused by fungal, viral, bacterial agents and insects. Rhamnolipids are surface active molecules produced mainly by various strains of the bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa. These secondary metabolites are composed of one to three fatty acids with various chain lengths linked through a glycosidic bond to one or two rhamnose moieties. The fatty acids are linked together through an ester bond. These molecules have shown several biological activities including plant defense stimulation. It has been suggested that this elicitor activity could be related to an interaction of rhamnolipids with the lipid bilayer of the plant plasma membrane (PPM) and lead to its destabilization, which can activate the plant defense signaling pathways. In this context, interactions of two rhamnolipids (Rha-C10-C10 and Rha-Rha-C10-C10) with biomimetic membranes of PPM such as Langmuir monolayers and multilayers were investigated using biophysical and in silico approaches. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 42 (5 ULg)
See detailPGPR elicitors of plant immunity: insights into the molecular basis of surfactin perception
Luzuriaga Loaiza, Walter ULg; Legras, Aurélien; Franzil, Laurent ULg et al

Scientific conference (2015)

Detailed reference viewed: 39 (1 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailAnalysis of the interactions of natural elicitor rhamnolipids with plant plasma membranes by in silico methods
Polo Lozano, Damien ULg; Nasir, Mehmet Nail ULg; Deleu, Magali ULg et al

Poster (2014, October 20)

Rhamnolipids are surface active molecules produced mainly by various strains of the bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa. These secondary metabolites are composed of one to three fatty acids with various ... [more ▼]

Rhamnolipids are surface active molecules produced mainly by various strains of the bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa. These secondary metabolites are composed of one to three fatty acids with various chain lengths linked through a glycosidic bond to one or two rhamnose moieties. The fatty acids are linked together through an ester bond. These molecules have shown several biological activities including plant defense stimulation. It has be suggested that this elicitor activity could be related to an interaction of rhamnolipids with the lipid bilayer of the plant plasma membrane (PPM) and lead to its destabilization, which can activate the plant defense signaling pathways. In this context, interactions of two rhamnolipids (Rha-C10-C10 and Rha-Rha-C10-C10) with membrane models and lipidic constituents of the PPM were investigated using in silico approaches. Most probable chemical structures of the rhamnolipids were determined using the STRUCTURE TREE procedure according to the molecule potential energy. The ability of these rhamnolipid structures to insert within the PPM was assessed using IMPALA simulations. IMPALA uses a membrane model in which phospholipids molecules are implicitly modeled by an empirical function and the membrane properties are modeled by energetic restraints. The ability of each rhamnolipid structure to form an assembly with several PPM constituents (phospholipid (PLPC), sterols (Sitosterol, Stigmasterol, Campesterol) and sphingolipids (GIPC, Glucosylceramide)) was calculated using the HYPERMATRIX procedure, which calculate and minimize the energies of interaction between all molecules of the complex until the lowest energy structure is reached. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 60 (5 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailModeling of the cyclic lipodepsipeptide Pseudodesmin A self-assembly through molecular dynamic simulations
Crowet, Jean-Marc ULg; Sinnaeve, Davy; Fehér, Krisztina et al

Conference (2014, September 30)

The self-assembly of short peptides into supramolecular structures represents an active field of research with potential applications, ranging from material sciences to medicine. Pseudodesmine A is a ... [more ▼]

The self-assembly of short peptides into supramolecular structures represents an active field of research with potential applications, ranging from material sciences to medicine. Pseudodesmine A is a cyclic lipodepsipeptide of nine residues which presents a moderate antibacterial activity and whose structure has been resolved by X-ray and NMR. In acetonitrile, Pseudodesmine A is monomeric while in chloroform, it has the same structure but assembles in a supramolecular complex. This structure could associate with membranes and be responsible for the biological activity of the peptide. Comparison of NMR data in the two solvents has given indications on the intermolecular contacts that arise in chloroform and a model for the self-association was proposed. To study in more details this assembly, molecular dynamics simulations have been carried on. The resultswere compared with detailed information given by NMR, regarding the dimensions of the assembly and the orientation of the individual peptide building blocks inside the supramolecular assembly. In acetonitrile, the simulations show that the peptide has transient interactions while in chloroform, interactions between monomers are always observed. In agreement with NMR, these interactions arise mainly between the backbone protons of the LEU1 and the GLN2, the GLN2 sidechain and the loop located on the opposite end of the monomer structure. From 10 simulations of dimerization, hydrogen bonds were followed and specific interaction patterns were identified regarding the hydrogen bonds formed. Peptide interactions are mainly described by 13 interaction patterns characterized by 2 to 4 hydrogen bonds. In dimers, the peptides can have a linear, a perpendicular or a side by side configuration. From the linear dimer, it is possible to reconstruct filaments and, by combining a linear and a lateral dimer, it is possible to build fibrils with multifilaments, as found in the NMR-derived model. Two self-consistent supramolecular models can be built from dimers and they present a very good correlation with NMR data regarding the supramolecular organization. Besides, the perpendicular dimer can gives peptide rings that can also explain the potential ability of this peptide to form ion pores in membranes. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 22 (6 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailModeling of the cyclic lipodepsipeptide Pseudodesmin A self-assembly through molecular dynamic simulations
Crowet, Jean-Marc ULg; Sinnaeve, Davy; Fehér, Krisztina et al

Poster (2014, August 21)

The self-assembly of short peptides into supramolecular structures represents an active field of research with potential applications, ranging from material sciences to medicine. Pseudodesmine A is a ... [more ▼]

The self-assembly of short peptides into supramolecular structures represents an active field of research with potential applications, ranging from material sciences to medicine. Pseudodesmine A is a cyclic lipodepsipeptide of nine residues which presents a moderate antibacterial activity and whose structure has been resolved by X-ray and NMR. In acetonitrile, Pseudodesmine A is monomeric while in chloroform, it has the same structure but assembles in a supramolecular complex. This structure could associate with membranes and be responsible for the biological activity of the peptide. Comparison of NMR data in the two solvents has given indications on the intermolecular contacts that arise in chloroform and a model for the self-association was proposed. To study in more details this assembly, molecular dynamics simulations have been carried on. The resultswere compared with detailed information given by NMR, regarding the dimensions of the assembly and the orientation of the individual peptide building blocks inside the supramolecular assembly. In acetonitrile, the simulations show that the peptide has transient interactions while in chloroform, interactions between monomers are always observed. In agreement with NMR, these interactions arise mainly between the backbone protons of the LEU1 and the GLN2, the GLN2 sidechain and the loop located on the opposite end of the monomer structure. From 10 simulations of dimerization, hydrogen bonds were followed and specific interaction patterns were identified regarding the hydrogen bonds formed. Peptide interactions are mainly described by 13 interaction patterns characterized by 2 to 4 hydrogen bonds. In dimers, the peptides can have a linear, a perpendicular or a side by side configuration. From the linear dimer, it is possible to reconstruct filaments and, by combining a linear and a lateral dimer, it is possible to build fibrils with multifilaments, as found in the NMR-derived model. Two self-consistent supramolecular models can be built from dimers and they present a very good correlation with NMR data regarding the supramolecular organization. Besides, the perpendicular dimer can gives peptide rings that can also explain the potential ability of this peptide to form ion pores in membranes. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 7 (1 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailModeling of the cyclic lipodepsipeptide Pseudodesmin A self-assembly through molecular dynamic simulations
Crowet, Jean-Marc ULg; Sinnaeve, Davy; Fehér, Krisztina et al

Conference (2014, August 20)

The self-assembly of short peptides into supramolecular structures represents an active field of research with potential applications, ranging from material sciences to medicine. Pseudodesmine A is a ... [more ▼]

The self-assembly of short peptides into supramolecular structures represents an active field of research with potential applications, ranging from material sciences to medicine. Pseudodesmine A is a cyclic lipodepsipeptide of nine residues which presents a moderate antibacterial activity and whose structure has been resolved by X-ray and NMR. In acetonitrile, Pseudodesmine A is monomeric while in chloroform, it has the same structure but assembles in a supramolecular complex. This structure could associate with membranes and be responsible for the biological activity of the peptide. Comparison of NMR data in the two solvents has given indications on the intermolecular contacts that arise in chloroform and a model for the self-association was proposed. To study in more details this assembly, molecular dynamics simulations have been carried on. The resultswere compared with detailed information given by NMR, regarding the dimensions of the assembly and the orientation of the individual peptide building blocks inside the supramolecular assembly. In acetonitrile, the simulations show that the peptide has transient interactions while in chloroform, interactions between monomers are always observed. In agreement with NMR, these interactions arise mainly between the backbone protons of the LEU1 and the GLN2, the GLN2 sidechain and the loop located on the opposite end of the monomer structure. From 10 simulations of dimerization, hydrogen bonds were followed and specific interaction patterns were identified regarding the hydrogen bonds formed. Peptide interactions are mainly described by 13 interaction patterns characterized by 2 to 4 hydrogen bonds. In dimers, the peptides can have a linear, a perpendicular or a side by side configuration. From the linear dimer, it is possible to reconstruct filaments and, by combining a linear and a lateral dimer, it is possible to build fibrils with multifilaments, as found in the NMR-derived model. Two self-consistent supramolecular models can be built from dimers and they present a very good correlation with NMR data regarding the supramolecular organization. Besides, the perpendicular dimer can gives peptide rings that can also explain the potential ability of this peptide to form ion pores in membranes. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 13 (2 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailMembrane interactions of cyclic lipodepsipeptides from the viscosin group
Geudens, Niels; Feher, Krisztina; De Vleeschouwer et al

Poster (2014, June)

Detailed reference viewed: 14 (4 ULg)