References of "Libert, Yves"
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See detailIs it possible to improve communication around radiotherapy delivery: A randomized study to assess the efficacy of team training?
Liénard, Aurore; Delevallez, France; Razavi, Darius et al

in Radiotherapy & Oncology (in press)

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See detailTransfer of communication skills to the workplace: Impact of a 38-hour communication skills training program designed for radiotherapy teams
Merckaert, Isabelle; Delevallez, France; Gibon, Anne-Sophie et al

in Journal of Clinical Oncology (2015), 33(8), 901-909

Purpose This study assessed the efficacy of a 38-hour communication skills training program designed to train a multidisciplinary radiotherapy team. Methods Four radiotherapy teams were randomly assigned ... [more ▼]

Purpose This study assessed the efficacy of a 38-hour communication skills training program designed to train a multidisciplinary radiotherapy team. Methods Four radiotherapy teams were randomly assigned to a training program or a waiting list. Assessments were scheduled at baseline and after training for the training group and at baseline and 4 months later for the waiting list group. Assessments included an audio recording of a radiotherapy planning session to assess team members’ communication skills and expression of concerns of patients with breast cancer (analyzed with content analysis software) and an adapted European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer satisfaction with care questionnaire completed by patients at the end of radiotherapy. Results Two hundred thirty-seven radiotherapy planning sessions were recorded. Compared with members of the untrained teams, members of the trained teams acquired, over time, more assessment skills (P = .003) and more supportive skills (P = .050) and provided more setting information (P = .010). Over time, patients interacting with members of the trained teams asked more open questions (P = .022), expressed more emotional words (P = .025), and exhibited a higher satisfaction level regarding nurses’ interventions (P = .028). Conclusion The 38-hour training program facilitated transfer of team member learned communication skills to the clinical practice and improved patients’ satisfaction with care. [less ▲]

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See detailIdentification of clinical parameters predictive of one-year survival using two geriatric tools in clinically fit older patients with hematological malignancies: Major impact of cognition
Dubruille, Stéphanie; Libert, Yves; Roos, Myriam et al

in Journal of Geriatric Oncology (2015), 6(5), 362-369

Background Little is known about the reliability of G8 screening tool and the prognostic value of clinical parameters within the Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment (CGA) in clinically fit older patients ... [more ▼]

Background Little is known about the reliability of G8 screening tool and the prognostic value of clinical parameters within the Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment (CGA) in clinically fit older patients with hematological malignancies. Materials and Methods This study was performed to assess the reliability of G8 as a screening tool and to determine the predictive value of CGA items in terms of 1-year overall survival (OS). G8 and CGA were proposed to 107 consecutive patients (65–89 years) with hematological malignancies assessed by their physicians as clinically fit, meaning not exhibiting geriatric syndromes and/or irreversible comorbidities significantly impairing their daily function, and thus able to receive chemotherapy. Results Out of 107 patients, 90 patients were evaluable and completed both scales; 72% and 80% were defined as “vulnerable” when evaluated with G8 (≤14.5) or CGA (≥2 impairments) respectively. The area under ROC-curve of G8 compared to CGA was 0.749 ± 0.051. Neither G8 nor CGA total scores were predictive of 1-year OS. However, age (HR = 1.105, 95% CI: 1.016–1.202; p = 0.019), diagnosis (HR = 5.208, 95% CI: 1.895–14.310; p = 0.001) and cognitive status (HR = 3.260, 95% CI: 1.043–10.194; p = 0.042) were predictive of OS. Conclusions We conclude that in our selected hematological patients: 1) the G8 score does not help selecting patients for CGA, 2) the G8 and CGA total scores do not predict OS, and 3) in addition to the age and disease itself, cognitive impairment appears to be a powerful prognostic factor. [less ▲]

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See detailAnxiety at the first radiotherapy session for non-metastatic breast cancer: Key communication and communication-related predictors.
Lewis, Florence; Merckaert, Isabelle; Lienard, Aurore et al

in Radiotherapy and oncology : journal of the European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (2015), 114(1), 35-41

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Patients may experience clinically relevant anxiety at their first radiotherapy (RT) sessions. To date, studies have not investigated during/around the RT simulation the key ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Patients may experience clinically relevant anxiety at their first radiotherapy (RT) sessions. To date, studies have not investigated during/around the RT simulation the key communication and communication-related predictors of this clinically relevant anxiety. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Breast cancer patients (n=227) completed visual analog scale (VAS) assessments of anxiety before and after their first RT sessions. Clinically relevant anxiety was defined as having pre- and post-first RT session VAS scores 4cm. Communication during RT simulation was assessed with content analysis software (LaComm), and communication-related variables around the RT simulation were assessed with questionnaires. RESULTS: Clinically relevant anxiety at the first RT session was predicted by lower self-efficacy to communicate with the RT team (OR=0.65; p=0.020), the perception of lower support received from the RT team (OR=0.70; p=0.020), lower knowledge of RT-associated side effects (OR=0.95; p=0.057), and higher use of emotion-focused coping (OR=1.09; p=0.013). CONCLUSIONS: This study provides RT team members with information about potential communication strategies, which may be used to reduce patient anxiety at the first RT session. [less ▲]

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See detailanxiety at the first radiotherapy session for non-metastatic brest cancer: key communication and communication-related predictors
Lewis, Florence; Merckaert, Isabelle; Liénard, Aurore et al

in Radiotherapy & Oncology (2014)

Background and purpose Patients may experience clinically relevant anxiety at their first radiotherapy (RT) sessions. To date, studies have not investigated during/around the RT simulation the key ... [more ▼]

Background and purpose Patients may experience clinically relevant anxiety at their first radiotherapy (RT) sessions. To date, studies have not investigated during/around the RT simulation the key communication and communication-related predictors of this clinically relevant anxiety. Material and methods Breast cancer patients (n = 227) completed visual analog scale (VAS) assessments of anxiety before and after their first RT sessions. Clinically relevant anxiety was defined as having pre- and post-first RT session VAS scores ⩾4 cm. Communication during RT simulation was assessed with content analysis software (LaComm), and communication-related variables around the RT simulation were assessed with questionnaires. Results Clinically relevant anxiety at the first RT session was predicted by lower self-efficacy to communicate with the RT team (OR = 0.65; p = 0.020), the perception of lower support received from the RT team (OR = 0.70; p = 0.020), lower knowledge of RT-associated side effects (OR = 0.95; p = 0.057), and higher use of emotion-focused coping (OR = 1.09; p = 0.013). Conclusions This study provides RT team members with information about potential communication strategies, which may be used to reduce patient anxiety at the first RT session. [less ▲]

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See detailLa prise en charge des altérations cognitives en oncologie : une revue des études longitudinales contrôlées
Borghgraef, Cindy; Libert, Yves; Etienne, Anne-Marie ULg et al

in Bulletin du Cancer (2014), 101(9), 866-875

Objectif. Diverses études rapportent la présence d’altérations cognitives chez les patients atteints d’un cancer. Le but de cet article est de proposer une revue des études longitudinales contrôlées ayant ... [more ▼]

Objectif. Diverses études rapportent la présence d’altérations cognitives chez les patients atteints d’un cancer. Le but de cet article est de proposer une revue des études longitudinales contrôlées ayant évalué l’efficacité d’interventions visant à prendre en charge ces altérations cognitives. Méthode. Les études longitudinales contrôlées ayant évalué l’efficacité d’interventions visant à prendre en charge les altérations cognitives chez les patients adultes atteints d’un cancer et publiées entre 1993 et 2013 ont été identifiées, à l’exception des études impliquant des patients atteints de tumeurs ou de métastases cérébrales. Résultats. Parmi les interventions pharmacologiques (n = 11), certaines suggèrent l’impact positif du modafinil notamment au niveau mnésique et exécutif. Les interventions non pharmacologiques (n = 10) démontrent l’impact positif de programmes de revalidation cognitive et de stimulation, de psycho-éducation et de la méditation sur plusieurs fonctions mnésiques, attentionnelles et exécutives, objectives et subjectives. Les interventions non pharmacologiques entraînent des améliorations cognitives plus importantes que les interventions pharmacologiques. Conclusions. Certaines études longitudinales contrôlées semblent démontrer l’intérêt de prendre en charge les altérations cognitives observées chez les patients atteints d’un cancer. De nouvelles études évaluant l’efficacité d’interventions combinant prise en charge des altérations cognitives et soutien psychothérapeutique à l’adaptation psychologique des patients devraient être menées. [less ▲]

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See detailAnxiety and its time courses during radiotherapy for non-metastatic breast cancer: A longitudinal study
Lewis, Florence; Merckaert, Isabelle; Liénard, Aurore et al

in Radiotherapy & Oncology (2014), 111(2), 276-280

Purpose: To our knowledge, no study has specifically assessed the time course of anxiety during radiotherapy (RT). The objective of this study was to assess anxiety time courses in patients with ... [more ▼]

Purpose: To our knowledge, no study has specifically assessed the time course of anxiety during radiotherapy (RT). The objective of this study was to assess anxiety time courses in patients with nonmetastatic breast cancer. Material and methods: This multicenter, descriptive longitudinal study included 213 consecutive patients with breast cancer who completed visual analog scales (VASs) assessing state anxiety before and after the RT simulation and the first and last five RT sessions. Results: Pre- and post-session anxiety mean levels were highest at the RT simulation (respectively, 2.9 ± 2.9 and 1.6 ± 2.5) and first RT session (respectively, 3.4 ± 2.9 and 2.0 ± 2.4), then declined rapidly. Clinically relevant mean differences (P1 cm on the VAS) between pre- and post-simulation/session VAS scores were found only for the RT simulation ( 1.3 ± 2.7; p < 0.001) and first RT session ( 1.4 ± 2.4; p < 0.001). Five percent to 16% of patients presented clinically relevant anxiety (pre- and post-simulation/session VAS scoresP4 cm) throughout treatment. Conclusions: To optimize care, RT team members should offer all patients appropriate information about treatment at the simulation, check patients’ understanding, and identify patients with clinically relevant anxiety requiring appropriate support throughout RT. [less ▲]

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See detailThe effect of communication skills training on residents' physiological arousal in a breaking bad news simulated task
Meunier, Julie; Merckaert, Isabelle; Libert, Yves et al

in Patient Education & Counseling (2013), 93(1), 40-47

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See detailIs it possible to improve radiotherapy team members’ communication skills. A randomized study assessing the efficacy of a 38h communications skills training program
GIBON, Anne-Sophie; MERCKAERT, Isabelle; LIENARD, Aurore et al

in Radiotherapy & Oncology (2013), 109(1), 170177

Background and purpose: Optimizing communication between radiotherapy team members and patients and between colleagues requires training. This study applies a randomized controlled design to assess the ... [more ▼]

Background and purpose: Optimizing communication between radiotherapy team members and patients and between colleagues requires training. This study applies a randomized controlled design to assess the efficacy of a 38-h communication skills training program. Material and methods: Four radiotherapy teams were randomly assigned either to a training program or to a waiting list. Team members’ communication skills and their self-efficacy to communicate in the context of an encounter with a simulated patient were the primary endpoints. These encounters were scheduled at the baseline and after training for the training group, and at the baseline and four months later for the waiting list group. Encounters were audiotaped and transcribed. Transcripts were analyzed with content analysis software (LaComm) and by an independent rater. Results: Eighty team members were included in the study. Compared to untrained team members, trained team members used more turns of speech with content oriented toward available resources in the team (relative rate [RR] = 1.38; p = 0.023), more assessment utterances (RR = 1.69; p < 0.001), more empathy (RR = 4.05; p = 0.037), more negotiation (RR = 2.34; p = 0.021) and more emotional words (RR = 1.32; p = 0.030), and their self-efficacy to communicate increased (p = 0.024 and p = 0.008, respectively). Conclusions: The training program was effective in improving team members’ communication skills and their self-efficacy to communicate in the context of an encounter with a simulated patient. Future study should assess the effect of this training program on communication with actual patients and their satisfaction. Moreover a cost-benefit analysis is needed, before implementing such an intensive training program on a broader scale. [less ▲]

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See detailLes fonctions cognitives au commencement d’une nouvelle ligne de traitement chez des patients âgés atteints d’un cancer hématologique
Jonius, Bénédicte; Libert, Yves; Bragard, Isabelle ULg et al

in Psycho-Oncologie (2013), 7(2), 118-129

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See detailIs it possible to improve the breaking bad news skills of residents when a relative is present? A randomised study.
Merckaert, Isabelle; Liénard, Aurore; Libert, Yves et al

in British Journal of Cancer (2013), 109

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See detailCommunication skills training for residents:which variables predict learning of skills?
Bragard, Isabelle ULg; Merckaert, Isabelle; Libert, Yves et al

in Open Journal of Medical Psychology (2012), 1

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See detailPredictors and correlates of burnout in residents working with cancer patients
Bragard, Isabelle ULg; Etienne, Anne-Marie ULg; Libert, Yves et al

in Journal of Cancer Education (2010)

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See detailIs it possible to improve residents' communication skills and patients' satisfaction? A randomised study assessing the efficacy of a communication and stress management skills training program
Liénard, Aurore; Merckaert, Isabelle; Libert, Yves et al

in Patient Education & Counseling (2009, September), 76(3),

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See detailCommunication skills training: A study of residents' psychosocial and physiological variables which facilitate or inhibit the learning of assessment skills
Hasoppe, Jennifer; Merckaert, Isabelle; Libert, Yves et al

in Psycho-oncology (2009, June)

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See detailPredictors and correlates of changes in residents' burnout level: Influence of person- and work-related variables
Bragard, Isabelle ULg; Etienne, Anne-Marie ULg; Libert, Yves et al

in Psycho-oncology (2009, June), 18 (Suppl. 2)

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See detailPhysicians are different when they learn communication skills: influence of the locus of control
Libert, Yves; Merckaert, I.; Reynaert, C. et al

in Psycho-Oncology (2007), 16(6), 553-562

Purpose: Although it is widely recognised that educational interventions may be more effective for people with an 'internal' Locus of Control (who believe that life outcomes are controlled by their own ... [more ▼]

Purpose: Although it is widely recognised that educational interventions may be more effective for people with an 'internal' Locus of Control (who believe that life outcomes are controlled by their own characteristics or actions) compared to people with an 'external' Locus of Control (who believe that life outcomes are controlled by external forces such as luck, fate or others), no study has yet assessed the influence of physicians' Locus of Control (LOC) on communication skills learning. This study aims to test the hypothesis that, in a communication skills training program, physicians with an 'internal' LOC would demonstrate communication skills acquisition to a greater degree than those with an 'external' LOC. Methods: A non-randomised longitudinal intervention study was conducted between January 1999 and April 2001. Sixty-seven volunteer physicians from private and institutional practice in Belgium participated in a learner-centred, skills-focused, practice-oriented communication skills training program. Communication skills changes were assessed in 2 standardised simulated interviews before and after training (one two-person and one three-person interview). Communication skills were assessed using the Cancer Research Campaign Workshop Evaluation Manual. Physicians' LOC was assessed using the Rotter I-E scale. Communication skills changes of the upper and lower third of physicians in respect of their scores on this scale were compared using group by time repeated measures of variance. Results: In the two-person and three-person interviews, changes in the use of open directive questions were more important among physicians with an "internal" LOC compared with changes observed among physicians with an 'external' LOC (P = 0.066 and P = 0.004, respectively). In the three-person interview, changes in the use of directive questions, assessing functions and moderate feelings stated explicitly were more important among physicians with an 'internal' LOC compared with changes observed among physicians with an 'external' LOC (P = 0.001; P = 0.002 and P = 0.011 respectively). Conclusion: This study shows that physicians' LOC is a psychological characteristic that could influence the efficacy of a communication skills training program. This evidence supports the idea that a psychological characteristic such as 'internal' LOC may facilitate communication skills acquisition through physicians' belief that communication with patients may be controlled by physicians themselves. Copyright (c) 2006 John Wiley [less ▲]

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See detailFactors that influence physicians' burnout: Impact of a communication skills training program
Bragard, Isabelle ULg; Libert, Yves; Merckaert, Isabelle et al

in Psycho-Oncology (2006, October), 15(2, Suppl. S), 183-184

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