References of "Libbrecht, C"
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See detailThe XMM-LSS survey: optical assessment and properties of different X-ray selected cluster classes
Adami, C.; Mazure, A.; Pierre, M. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2011), 526(A18), 36

XMM and Chandra opened a new area for the study of clusters of galaxies. Not only for cluster physics but also, for the detection of faint and distant clusters that were inaccessible with previous ... [more ▼]

XMM and Chandra opened a new area for the study of clusters of galaxies. Not only for cluster physics but also, for the detection of faint and distant clusters that were inaccessible with previous missions. This article presents 66 spectroscopically confirmed clusters (0.05<z<1.5) within an area of 6 deg2 enclosed in the XMM-LSS survey. Almost two thirds have been confirmed with dedicated spectroscopy only and 10% have been confirmed with dedicated spectroscopy supplemented by literature redshifts. Sub-samples, or classes, of extended-sources are defined in a two-dimensional X-ray parameter space allowing for various degrees of completeness and contamination. We describe the procedure developed to assess the reality of these cluster candidates using the CFHTLS photometric data and spectroscopic information from our own follow-up campaigns. Most of these objects are low mass clusters, hence constituting a still poorly studied population. In a second step, we quantify correlations between the optical properties such as richness or velocity dispersion and the cluster X-ray luminosities. We examine the relation of the clusters to the cosmic web. Finally, we review peculiar structures in the surveyed area like very distant clusters and fossil groups. [less ▲]

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See detailThe XMM-LSS survey: the Class 1 cluster sample over the initial 5 deg(2) and its cosmological modelling
Pacaud, F.; Pierre, M.; Adami, C. et al

in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society (2007), 382(3), 1289-1308

We present a sample of 29 galaxy clusters from the XMM-LSS survey over an area of some 5 deg(2) out to a redshift of z = 1.05. The sample clusters, which represent about half of the X-ray clusters ... [more ▼]

We present a sample of 29 galaxy clusters from the XMM-LSS survey over an area of some 5 deg(2) out to a redshift of z = 1.05. The sample clusters, which represent about half of the X-ray clusters identified in the region, follow well-defined X-ray selection criteria and are all spectroscopically confirmed. For all clusters, we provide X-ray luminosities and temperatures as well as masses, obtained from dedicated spatial and spectral fitting. The cluster distribution peaks around z = 0.3 and T = 1.5 keV, half of the objects being groups with a temperature below 2 keV. Our L-X-T(z) relation points towards self-similar evolution, but does not exclude other physically plausible models. Assuming that cluster scaling laws follow self-similar evolution, our number density estimates up to z = 1 are compatible with the predictions of the concordance cosmology and with the findings of previous ROSAT surveys. Our well-monitored selection function allowed us to demonstrate that the inclusion of selection effects is essential for the correct determination of the evolution of the L-X-T relation, which may explain the contradictory results from previous studies. Extensive simulations show that extending the survey area to 10 deg(2) has the potential to exclude the non-evolution hypothesis, but those constraints on more refined intracluster medium models will probably be limited by the large intrinsic dispersion of the L-X-T relation, whatever be the sample size. We further demonstrate that increasing the dispersion in the scaling laws increases the number of detectable clusters, hence generating further degeneracy [in addition to sigma(8), Omega(m), L-X-T(z)] in the cosmological interpretation of the cluster number counts. We provide useful empirical formulae for the cluster mass-flux and mass-count rate relations as well as a comparison between the XMM-LSS mass sensitivity and that of forthcoming Sunyaev-Zel'dovich surveys. [less ▲]

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See detailThe XMM-Large scale structure catalogue: X-ray sources and associated optical data. Version I
Pierre, M.; Chiappetti, L.; Pacaud, F. et al

in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society (2007), 382(1), 279-290

Following the presentation of the XMM-Large Scale Structure (XMM-LSS) survey X-ray source detection package by Pacaud et al., we provide the source lists for the first surveyed 5.5 deg(2). The catalogues ... [more ▼]

Following the presentation of the XMM-Large Scale Structure (XMM-LSS) survey X-ray source detection package by Pacaud et al., we provide the source lists for the first surveyed 5.5 deg(2). The catalogues pertain to the [0.5-2] and [2-10] keV bands and contain in total 3385 pointlike or extended sources above a detection likelihood of 15 in either band. The agreement with deep log N-log S is excellent. The main parameters considered are position, count rate, source extent with associated likelihood values. A set of additional quantities such as astrometric corrections and fluxes are further calculated while errors on the position and count rate are deduced from simulations. We describe the construction of the band-merged catalogue allowing rapid subsample selection and easy cross-correlation with external multiwavelength catalogues. A small optical Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey multiband subset of objects are associated with each source along with an X-ray/optical overlay. We make the full X-ray images available in FITS format. The data are available at the Centre de Donnees de Strasbourg and, in a more extended form, at the Milan XMM-LSS survey data base. [less ▲]

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See detailXMM-LSS catalogue. Version I. (Pierre+, 2007)
Pierre, M.; Chiappetti, L.; Pacaud, F. et al

Textual, factual or bibliographical database (2007)

We provide the source list for the first 5.5 surveyed square degrees of the XMM-LSS, with a total of 3385 point-like or extended sources above a detection likelihood of 15 in either 0.5-2 or 2-10keV bands ... [more ▼]

We provide the source list for the first 5.5 surveyed square degrees of the XMM-LSS, with a total of 3385 point-like or extended sources above a detection likelihood of 15 in either 0.5-2 or 2-10keV bands. The table at CDS contains the main parameters, while further parameters and data products (X-ray images and optical thumbnails) are available in the Milan XMM-LSS database site. (1 data file). [less ▲]

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See detailThe 4m international liquid mirror telescope (ILMT)
Surdej, Jean ULg; Absil, Olivier ULg; Bartczak, Przemyslaw ULg et al

in Stepp, Larry (Ed.) Ground-based and Airborne Telescopes (2006, July 01)

The entire funding has recently been obtained in Belgium for the construction of a 4m Liquid Mirror Telescope. Its prime focus will be equipped with a semi-conventional glass corrector allowing to correct ... [more ▼]

The entire funding has recently been obtained in Belgium for the construction of a 4m Liquid Mirror Telescope. Its prime focus will be equipped with a semi-conventional glass corrector allowing to correct for the TDI effect and a thinned, high quantum efficiency, 4K × 4K pixel equivalent CCD camera. It will be capable of subarcsecond imaging in the i'(760 nm) and possibly r', g' band(s) over a field of ~ 30' in diameter. This facility will be entirely dedicated to a deep photometric and astrometric variability survey over a period of ~ 5 years. In this paper, the working principle of liquid mirror telescopes is first recalled, along with the advantages and disadvantages of the latter over classical telescopes. Several science cases are described. For a good access to one of the galactic poles, the best image quality sites for the ILMT are located either in Northern Chile (latitude near -29°30') or in North-East India (Nainital Hills, latitude near +29°30'). At those geographic latitudes, a deep (i' = 22.5 mag.) survey will approximately cover 90 square degrees at high galactic latitude, which is very useful for gravitational lensing studies as well as for the identification of various classes of interesting galactic and extragalactic objects (cf. microlensed stars, supernovae, clusters, etc.). A description of the telescope, its instrumentation and the handling of the data is also presented. [less ▲]

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See detailPhotometric monitoring of the doubly imaged quasar UM 673: possible evidence for chromatic microlensing
Nakos, Theodoros; Courbin, F.; Poels, Joël ULg et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2005), 441

We present the results of two-band CCD photometric monitoring of the gravitationally lensed quasar Q 0142-100 (UM 673). The data, obtained at ESO-La Silla with the 1.54 m Danish telescope in the Gunn i ... [more ▼]

We present the results of two-band CCD photometric monitoring of the gravitationally lensed quasar Q 0142-100 (UM 673). The data, obtained at ESO-La Silla with the 1.54 m Danish telescope in the Gunn i-band (October 1998-September 1999) and in the Johnson V-band (October 1998 to December 2001), were analyzed using three different photometric methods. The light-curves obtained with all methods show variations, with a peak-to-peak amplitude of 0.14 mag in V. Although it was not possible to measure the time delay between the two lensed QSO images, the brighter component displays possible evidence for microlensing: it becomes bluer as it gets brighter, as expected under the assumption of differential magnification of a quasar accretion disk. [less ▲]

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See detailAccurate photometric light curves of the lensed components of Q2237+0305 derived with an optimal image subtraction technique: Evidence for microlensing in image A
Moreau, O.; Libbrecht, C.; Lee, D. W. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2005), 436(2), 479-492

Using an optimal image subtraction technique, we have derived the V and R light curves of the four lensed QSO components of Q2237+0305 from the monitoring CCD frames obtained by the GLITP collaboration ... [more ▼]

Using an optimal image subtraction technique, we have derived the V and R light curves of the four lensed QSO components of Q2237+0305 from the monitoring CCD frames obtained by the GLITP collaboration with the 2.6m NOT telescope in 1999/2000 (Alcalde et al. 2002). We give here a detailed account of the data reduction and analysis and of the error estimates. In agreement with Wozniak et al. (2000a,b), the good derived photometric accuracy of the GLITP data allows to discuss the possible interpretation of the light curve of component A as due to a microlensing event taking place in the deflecting galaxy. This interpretation is strengthened by the colour dependence of the early rise of the light curve of component A, as it probably corresponds to a caustics crossing by the QSO source. [less ▲]

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See detailQSO 2237+0305 VR light curves from Gravitational Lenses International Time Project optical monitoring
Alcalde, D.; Mediavilla, E.; Moreau, O. et al

in Astrophysical Journal (2002), 572(2, Part 1), 729-734

We present VR observations of QSO 2237+ 0305 conducted by the Gravitational Lensing International Time Project collaboration from 1999 October 1 to 2000 February 3. The observations were made with the 2 ... [more ▼]

We present VR observations of QSO 2237+ 0305 conducted by the Gravitational Lensing International Time Project collaboration from 1999 October 1 to 2000 February 3. The observations were made with the 2.56 m Nordic Optical Telescope at Roque de los Muchachos Observatory, La Palma ( Spain). The pointspread function ( PSF) fitting method and an adapted version of the ISIS subtraction method have been used to derive the VR light curves of the four components ( A D) of the quasar. The mean errors range in the intervals 0.01-0.04 mag ( PSF fitting) and 0.01-0.02 mag ( ISIS subtraction), with the faintest component ( D) having the largest uncertainties. We address the relatively good agreement between the A and D light curves derived using different filters, photometric techniques, and telescopes. The new VR light curves of component A extend the time coverage of a high-magnification microlensing peak, which was discovered by the OGLE team. [less ▲]

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See detailDaily monitoring of the gravitational lens QSO 2237+0305 at the Nordic Optical Telescope
Puga, E.; Alcalde, D.; Barrena, R. et al

in Gorgas, Javier; Zamorano, Jaime; Gallego, Jesus (Eds.) Highlights of Spanish astrophysics II (2001)

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