References of "Lian, L. Y"
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See detailDNA-binding mechanism of the Escherichia coli Ada O(6)-alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase.
Verdemato, P. E.; Brannigan, J. A.; Damblon, Christian ULg et al

in Nucleic Acids Research (2000), 28(19), 3710-8

The C-terminal domain of the Escherichia coli Ada protein (Ada-C) aids in the maintenance of genomic integrity by efficiently repairing pre-mutagenic O:(6)-alkylguanine lesions in DNA. Structural and ... [more ▼]

The C-terminal domain of the Escherichia coli Ada protein (Ada-C) aids in the maintenance of genomic integrity by efficiently repairing pre-mutagenic O:(6)-alkylguanine lesions in DNA. Structural and thermodynamic studies were carried out to obtain a model of the DNA-binding process. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies map the DNA-binding site to helix 5, and a loop region (residues 151-160) which form the recognition helix and the 'wing' of a helix-turn-wing motif, respectively. The NMR data also suggest the absence of a large conformational change in the protein upon binding to DNA. Hence, an O:(6)-methylguanine (O:(6)meG) lesion would be inaccessible to active site nucleophile Cys146 if the modified base remained stacked within the DNA duplex. The experimentally determined DNA-binding face of Ada-C was used in combination with homology modelling, based on the catabolite activator protein, and the accepted base-flipping mechanism, to construct a model of how Ada-C binds to DNA in a productive manner. To complement the structural studies, thermodynamic data were obtained which demonstrate that binding to unmethylated DNA was entropically driven, whilst the demethylation reaction provoked an exothermic heat change. Methylation of Cys146 leads to a loss of structural integrity of the DNA-binding subdomain. [less ▲]

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See detailThe catalytic mechanism of beta-lactamases: NMR titration of an active-site lysine residue of the TEM-1 enzyme.
Damblon, Christian ULg; Raquet, X.; Lian, L. Y. et al

in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (1996), 93(5), 1747-52

Beta-Lactamases are widespread in the bacterial world, where they are responsible for resistance to penicillins, cephalosporins, and related compounds, currently the most widely used antibacterial agents ... [more ▼]

Beta-Lactamases are widespread in the bacterial world, where they are responsible for resistance to penicillins, cephalosporins, and related compounds, currently the most widely used antibacterial agents. Detailed structural and mechanistic understanding of these enzymes can be expected to guide the design of new antibacterial compounds resistant to their action. A number of high-resolution structures are available for class A beta-lactamases, whose catalytic mechanism involves the acylation of a serine residue at the active site. The identity of the general base which participates in the activation of this serine residue during catalysis has been the subject of controversy, both a lysine residue and a glutamic acid residue having been proposed as candidates for this role. We have used the pH dependence of chemical modification of epsilon-amino groups by 2,4,6,-trinitrobenzenesulfonate and the pH dependence of the epsilon-methylene 1H and 13C chemical shifts (in enzyme selectively labeled with [epsilon-13C]lysine) to estimate the pKa of the relevant lysine residue, lysine-73, of TEM-1 beta-lactamase. Both methods show that the pKa of this residue is > 10, making it very unlikely that this residue could act as a proton acceptor in catalysis. An alternative mechanism in which this role is performed by glutamate-166 through an intervening water molecule is described. [less ▲]

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