References of "Lenz, O"
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See detailHeterogeneity of brain glucose metabolism in mild cognitive impairment and clinical progression to Alzheimer disease
Anchisi, D.; Borroni, B.; Franceschi, M. et al

in Archives of Neurology (2005), 62(11), 1728-1733

Background: Subjects with amnesic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI) may include patients at high risk for progression to Alzheimer disease (AD) and a population with different underlying pathologic ... [more ▼]

Background: Subjects with amnesic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI) may include patients at high risk for progression to Alzheimer disease (AD) and a population with different underlying pathologic conditions. Objective: To evaluate the potential roles of positron emission tomography with fluodeoxyglucose F 18 ((18)FDG-PET) and memory scores in identifying subjects with aMCI and in predicting progression to dementia. Design, Setting, and Patients: Sixty-seven patients at European centers for neurologic and AD care who were diagnosed as having aMCI each underwent an extensive clinical and neuropsychological examination and an (18)FDG-PET study. Forty-eight subjects were followed up periodically for at least I year, and progression to dementia was evaluated. Main Outcome Measures: Brain glucose metabolism and memory scores. Results: Fourteen subjects with aMCI who converted to AD within 1 year showed bilateral hypometabolism in the inferior parietal, posterior cingulate, and medial temporal cortex. Subjects with "stable" aMCI presented with hypometabolism in the dorsolateral frontal cortex. The severity of memory impairment, as evaluated by the California Verbal Learning Test-Long Delay Free Recall scores, correlated with the following brain metabolic patterns: scores less than 7 were associated with a typical (18)FDG-PET AD pattern, and scores of 7 or higher were associated with hypornetabolism in the dorsolateral frontal cortex and no progression to AD. Conclusion: These data provide evidence for clinical and functional heterogeneity among subjects with aMCI and suggest that (18)FDG-PET findings combined with memory scores may be useful in predicting short-term conversion to AD. [less ▲]

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See detailAnosognosia in very mild Alzheimer's disease but not in mild cognitive impairment
Kalbe, E.; Salmon, Eric ULg; Perani, D. et al

in Dementia & Geriatric Cognitive Disorders (2005), 19(5-6), 349-356

Objective: To study awareness of cognitive dysfunction in patients with very mild Alzheimer's disease (AD) and subjects with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Methods: A complaint interview covering 13 ... [more ▼]

Objective: To study awareness of cognitive dysfunction in patients with very mild Alzheimer's disease (AD) and subjects with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Methods: A complaint interview covering 13 cognitive domains was administered to 82 AD and 79 MCI patients and their caregivers. The patient groups were comparable according to age and education, and Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE) scores were ≥ 24 in all cases. The discrepancy between the patients' and caregivers' estimations of impairments was taken as a measure of anosognosia. Results: Self-reports of cognitive difficulties were comparable for AD and MCI patients. However, while in comparison to caregivers MCI patients reported significantly more cognitive impairment (p < 0.05), AD patients complained significantly less cognitive dysfunctions (p < 0.001). Conclusions: While most MCI patients tend to overestimate cognitive deficits when compared to their caregiver's assessment, AD patients in early stages of disease underestimate cognitive dysfunctions. Anosognosia can thus be regarded as a characteristic symptom at a stage of very mild AD (MMSE ≥ 24) but not MCI. Accordingly, medical history even in mildly affected patients should always include information from both patient and caregiver. Copyright (C) 2005 S. Karger AG, Basel. [less ▲]

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