References of "Lehembre, Remy"
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See detailDetecting Consciousness with a Brain-computer Interface
Noirhomme, Quentin ULg; Lesenfants, Damien ULg; Lehembre, Remy ULg et al

in Pons, J. L.; Torricelli, D.; Pajaro, M. (Eds.) Converging Clinical and Engineering Research on Neurorehabilitation (2012, November)

Recent electrophysiological and neuroimaging studies showed command-specific changes in EEG or fMRI signals of unresponsive patients providing motor-independent evidence of conscious thoughts. These ... [more ▼]

Recent electrophysiological and neuroimaging studies showed command-specific changes in EEG or fMRI signals of unresponsive patients providing motor-independent evidence of conscious thoughts. These promising results have paved the way for a new application for Brain-computer Interface (BCI): detecting consciousness in patients with disorders of consciousness (DOC). In the present abstract, we review the first results obtained by BCI-like applications in patients with DOC and discuss the challenges facing BCI research. We believe that patients with DOC may benefit from BCI based diagnosis. BCIs may detect changes in the signal in response to command and, in some cases, may permit communication. [less ▲]

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See detailROLE OF ACTIVE ERP PARADIGMS IN AWARENESS DETECTION IN NON RESPONSIVE PATIENTS
Lugo, Zulay; Lesenfants, Damien ULg; Lehembre, Remy ULg et al

in Proceedings of the 1st international DECODER Workshop (2012, April)

The role of active vs. passive ERP paradigms in disorders of consciousness is assessed in this case study of a LIS patient. Results show that despite absent P3 in a passive auditory task, the patient ... [more ▼]

The role of active vs. passive ERP paradigms in disorders of consciousness is assessed in this case study of a LIS patient. Results show that despite absent P3 in a passive auditory task, the patient displayed significant differences in the active task. This study shows the importance of using a large battery of tests when assessing DOC patients. [less ▲]

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See detailElectrophysiological investigations of brain function in coma, vegetative and minimally conscious patients.
Lehembre, Remy ULg; Gosseries, Olivia ULg; Lugo, Zulay et al

in Archives Italiennes de Biologie (2012), 150(2-3), 122-39

Electroencephalographic activity in the context of disorders of consciousness is a swiss knife like tool that can evaluate different aspects of cognitive residual function, detect consciousness and ... [more ▼]

Electroencephalographic activity in the context of disorders of consciousness is a swiss knife like tool that can evaluate different aspects of cognitive residual function, detect consciousness and provide a mean to communicate with the outside world without using muscular channels. Standard recordings in the neurological department offer a first global view of the electrogenesis of a patient and can spot abnormal epileptiform activity and therefore guide treatment. Although visual patterns have a prognosis value, they are not sufficient to provide a diagnosis between vegetative state/unresponsive wakefulness syndrome (VS/UWS) and minimally conscious state (MCS) patients. Quantitative electroencephalography (qEEG) processes the data and retrieves features, not visible on the raw traces, which can then be classified. Current results using qEEG show that MCS can be differentiated from VS/UWS patients at the group level. Event Related Potentials (ERP) are triggered by varying stimuli and reflect the time course of information processing related to the stimuli from low-level peripheral receptive structures to high-order associative cortices. It is hence possible to assess auditory, visual, or emotive pathways. Different stimuli elicit positive or negative components with different time signatures. The presence of these components when observed in passive paradigms is usually a sign of good prognosis but it cannot differentiate VS/UWS and MCS patients. Recently, researchers have developed active paradigms showing that the amplitude of the component is modulated when the subject's attention is focused on a task during stimulus presentation. Hence significant differences between ERPs of a patient in a passive compared to an active paradigm can be a proof of consciousness. An EEG-based brain-computer interface (BCI) can then be tested to provide the patient with a communication tool. BCIs have considerably improved the past two decades. However they are not easily adaptable to comatose patients as they can have visual or auditory impairments or different lesions affecting their EEG signal. Future progress will require large databases of resting state-EEG and ERPs experiment of patients of different etiologies. This will allow the identification of specific patterns related to the diagnostic of consciousness. Standardized procedures in the use of BCIs will also be needed to find the most suited technique for each individual patient. [less ▲]

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See detailResting-state EEG study of comatose patients: a connectivity and frequency analysis to find differences between vegetative and minimally conscious states.
Lehembre, Remy ULg; Bruno, Marie-Aurélie ULg; Vanhaudenhuyse, Audrey ULg et al

in Functional Neurology (2012), 27(1), 41-47

The aim of this study was to look for differences in the power spectra and in EEG connectivity measures between patients in the vegetative state (VS/UWS) and patients in the minimally conscious state (MCS ... [more ▼]

The aim of this study was to look for differences in the power spectra and in EEG connectivity measures between patients in the vegetative state (VS/UWS) and patients in the minimally conscious state (MCS). The EEG of 31 patients was recorded and analyzed. Power spectra were obtained using modern multitaper methods. Three connectivity measures (coherence, the imaginary part of coherency and the phase lag index) were computed. Of the 31 patients, 21 were diagnosed as MCS and 10 as VS/UWS using the Coma Recovery Scale-Revised (CRS-R). EEG power spectra revealed differences between the two conditions. The VS/UWS patients showed increased delta power but decreased alpha power compared with the MCS patients. Connectivity measures were correlated with the CRS-R diagnosis; patients in the VS/UWS had significantly lower connectivity than MCS patients in the theta and alpha bands. Standard EEG recorded in clinical conditions could be used as a tool to help the clinician in the diagnosis of disorders of consciousness. [less ▲]

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See detailElectrophysiology and disorders of consciousness
Noirhomme, Quentin ULg; Lehembre, Remy ULg

in Schnakers, Caroline; Laureys, Steven (Eds.) Coma and disorders of consciousness (2012)

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See detailDesign of a novel covert SSVEP-based BCI
Lesenfants, Damien ULg; Partoune, Nicolas; Soddu, Andrea ULg et al

in Proceedings of the 5th International Brain-Computer Interface Conference 2011 (2011, September 22)

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See detailAutomated EEG entropy measurements in coma, vegetative state/unresponsive wakefulness syndrome and minimally conscious state
Gosseries, Olivia ULg; Schnakers, Caroline ULg; LEDOUX, Didier ULg et al

in Functional Neurology (2011)

Monitoring the level of consciousness in brain injured patients with disorders of consciousness is crucial as it provides diagnostic and prognostic information. Behavioral assessment remains the gold ... [more ▼]

Monitoring the level of consciousness in brain injured patients with disorders of consciousness is crucial as it provides diagnostic and prognostic information. Behavioral assessment remains the gold standard for assessing consciousness but previous studies have shown a high rate of misdiagnosis. This study aimed to investigate the usefulness of electroencephalography (EEG) entropy measurements in differentiating unconscious (coma or vegetative) from minimally conscious patients. Left fronto-temporal EEG recordings (10-minute resting state epochs) were prospectively obtained in 56 patients and 16 age-matched healthy volunteers. Patients were assessed in the acute (≤1 month post-injury;n=29) or chronic (>1 month post-injury; n=27) stage. The etiology was traumatic in 23 patients. Automated online EEG entropy calculations (providing an arbitrary value ranging from 0 to 91) were compared with behavioral assessments (Coma Recovery Scale-Revised) and outcome. EEG entropy correlated with Coma Recovery Scale total scores (r=0.49). Mean EEG entropy values were higher in minimally conscious (73±19; mean and standard deviation) than in vegetative/unresponsive wakefulness syndrome patients (45±28). Receiver operating characteristic analysis revealed an entropy cut-off value of 52 differentiating acute unconscious from minimally conscious patients (sensitivity 89% and specificity 90%). In chronic patients, entropy measurements offered no reliable diagnostic information. EEG entropy measurements did not allow prediction of outcome. User-independent time-frequency balanced spectral EEG entropy measurements seem to constitute an interesting diagnostic – albeit not prognostic – tool for assessing neural network complexity in disorders of consciousness in the acute setting. Future studies are needed before using this tool in routine clinical practice, and these should seek to improve automated EEG quantification paradigms in order to reduce the remaining false negative and false positive findings. [less ▲]

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See detailElectrophysiologie des états de conscience altérée
Noirhomme, Quentin ULg; Lehembre, Remy ULg

in Schnakers, Caroline; Laureys, Steven (Eds.) Coma et états de conscience altérée (2011)

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See detailMultimodal neuroimaging in patients with disorders of consciousness showing "functional hemispherectomy".
Bruno, Marie-Aurélie ULg; Fernandez-Espejo, D.; Lehembre, Remy ULg et al

in Progress in Brain Research (2011), 193

Beside behavioral assessment of patients with disorders of consciousness, neuroimaging modalities may offer objective paraclinical markers important for diagnosis and prognosis. They provide information ... [more ▼]

Beside behavioral assessment of patients with disorders of consciousness, neuroimaging modalities may offer objective paraclinical markers important for diagnosis and prognosis. They provide information on the structural location and extent of brain lesions (e.g., morphometric MRI and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI-MRI) assessing structural connectivity) but also their functional impact (e.g., metabolic FDG-PET, hemodynamic fMRI, and EEG measurements obtained in "resting state" conditions). We here illustrate the role of multimodal imaging in severe brain injury, presenting a patient in unresponsive wakefulness syndrome (UWS; i.e., vegetative state, VS) and in a "fluctuating" minimally conscious state (MCS). In both cases, resting state FDG-PET, fMRI, and EEG showed a functionally preserved right hemisphere, while DTI showed underlying differences in structural connectivity highlighting the complementarities of these neuroimaging methods in the study of disorders of consciousness. [less ▲]

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See detailBrain connectivity in pathological and pharmacological coma
Noirhomme, Quentin ULg; Soddu, Andrea ULg; Lehembre, Remy ULg et al

in Frontiers in Systems Neuroscience [=FNSYS] (2010), 4

Recent studies in patients with disorders of consciousness (DOC) tend to support the view that awareness is not related to activity in a single brain region but to thalamo-cortical connectivity in the ... [more ▼]

Recent studies in patients with disorders of consciousness (DOC) tend to support the view that awareness is not related to activity in a single brain region but to thalamo-cortical connectivity in the frontoparietal network. Functional neuroimaging studies have shown preserved albeit disconnected low-level cortical activation in response to external stimulation in patients in a “vegetative state” or unresponsive wakefulness syndrome. While activation of these “primary” sensory cortices does not necessarily reflect conscious awareness, activation in higher-order associative cortices in minimally conscious state patients seems to herald some residual perceptual awareness. PET studies have identified a metabolic dysfunction in a widespread frontoparietal “global neuronal workspace” in DOC patients including the midline default mode network (“intrinsic” system) and the lateral frontoparietal cortices or “extrinsic system.” Recent studies have investigated the relation of awareness to the functional connectivity within intrinsic and extrinsic networks, and with the thalami in both pathological and pharmacological coma. In brain damaged patients, connectivity in all default network areas was found to be non-linearly correlated with the degree of clinical consciousness impairment, ranging from healthy controls and locked-in syndrome to minimally conscious, vegetative, coma, and brain dead patients. Anesthesia-induced loss of consciousness was also shown to correlate with a global decrease in cortico-cortical and thalamo-cortical connectivity in both intrinsic and extrinsic networks, but not in auditory, or visual networks. In anesthesia, unconsciousness was also associated with a loss of cross-modal interactions between networks. These results suggest that conscious awareness critically depends on the functional integrity of thalamo-cortical and cortico-cortical frontoparietal connectivity within and between “intrinsic” and “extrinsic” brain networks. [less ▲]

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See detailBrain-computer interface in disorders of consciousness: answering simple questions with a P3 speller
Noirhomme, Quentin ULg; Chatelle, Camille ULg; Kleih, Sonja et al

Poster (2010, June)

Objective: In the recovery from coma, the acquisition of command following represents an important milestone, indicating emergence from the vegetative state (Schnakers et al., 2009). In some patients ... [more ▼]

Objective: In the recovery from coma, the acquisition of command following represents an important milestone, indicating emergence from the vegetative state (Schnakers et al., 2009). In some patients, recovery of consciousness may precede motor recovery. Brain-computer interfaces (BCI) might permit these patients to show non-motor dependent signs of awareness and in a next step might enable communication. This study aimed at testing to what extent an EEG-based BCI could help detecting signs of awareness and communication in disorders of consciousness. We employed a P300 based BCI where healthy volunteers and patients with locked-in syndrome and in a minimally conscious state were asked to answer yes or no to simple questions by paying attention to one out of four auditorily presented stimuli (‘yes’, ‘no’, ‘stop’, ‘go’). Methods: We studied 13 patients with a minimally conscious state (MCS, 5 TBI – 8 anoxic, mean time post injury 70±109 months; mean age 42 ± 21) and 2 in pseudo-coma or locked in syndrome (LIS; brainstem stroke, time post injury 26 and 46 months; aged 63 and 29)) and 16 healthy controls (aged 45±19). Patients were evaluated using the Coma Recovery Scale Revised (CRS-R). An auditory P300 four choice speller paradigm (Furdea et al., 2009) based on the BCI2000 system (Schalk et al., 2004) was used. 16-Channel EEG was recorded using a g.tec USBAmp amplifier. A trial constituted of 15 presentation of four sounds the order of presentation being pseudo-randomized (sound duration: ~400ms; inter-stimulus interval: ~600ms). After a training session of 4 trials, patients and healthy subjects were required to answer 10 or 12 questions, respectively. Questions were of the following kind: “Is your name Quentin?”, “Is your mother’s name Dorothée?”. A stepwise linear discriminant analysis based on the training session was used to classify the data and to provide online feedback. Offline, all training and testing sequences were pooled. Sequences with artifacts were discarded and a leave-one-out approach was used to classify the data. Results: Healthy subjects presented a mean correct response rate of 73% online and 93% offline. Note that online classification failed for one control subject due to a presumed change in cognitive strategy between training and testing sessions. LIS patients showed a correct response rate of 30 and 60% (online) and 36 and 79% (offline). Three MCS patients had a correct response rate of ≥50% offline (10, 18, 0% online and 50, 53, 57% offline). Two of these three patients did not show any command following at the bedside. The 10 remaining MCS cases showed online and offline correct answers <50% (mean 33±9% online and 25±13% offline). Conclusion: Our auditory P300-based BCI permitted functional interactive communication in 15/16 controls (online) and in all offline. Our data obtained in patients with locked-in syndrome and disorders of consciousness demonstrate the potential clinical usefulness of the technique following coma but also show lower accuracy in patients as compared to healthy volunteers. This might be due to fluctuating attentional levels and exhaustibility in the MCS and to the suboptimal EEG recording quality due to movement, ocular and respiration artifacts in these challenging patients. Further algorithmic developments should include automatic artifact detection and single trial classification. Despite the need for further improvement in BCI devices adapted to post-coma patients, our results already indicate that MCS patients without any clinical sign of command-following can employ a yes-no speller offering the hope of functional interactive communication and a possibility for decision making and autonomy. Bibliography Furdea A, Halder S, Krusienski DJ, Bross D, Nijboer F, Birbaumer N, Kübler A, 2009, An auditory oddball (P300) spelling system for brain-computer interfaces, Psychophysiology. May; 46(3):617-25. Schalk G., McFarland D.J., Hinterberger T., Birbaumer N., and Wolpaw J.R. 2004, BCI2000: A General-Purpose Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) System, IEEE Trans Biomed Eng, 51(6). Schnakers C, Vanhaudenhuyse A, Giacino J, Ventura; Boly M, Majerus S, Moonen G, Laureys S, 2009, Diagnostic accuracy of the vegetative and minimally conscious state: Clinical consensus versus standardized neurobehavioral assessment, BMC Neurology, 9 (35). [less ▲]

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See detailProbing command following in patients with disorders of consciousness using a brain-computer interface
Noirhomme, Quentin ULg; Chatelle, Camille ULg; Kleih, Sonja et al

Conference (2010, June)

Objective: In the recovery from coma, the acquisition of command following represents an important milestone, indicating emergence from the vegetative state. In some patients, recovery of consciousness ... [more ▼]

Objective: In the recovery from coma, the acquisition of command following represents an important milestone, indicating emergence from the vegetative state. In some patients, recovery of consciousness may precede motor recovery. Brain-computer interfaces (BCI) might permit these patients to show non-motor dependent signs of awareness and in a next step might enable communication. This study aimed at testing to what extent an EEG-based BCI could help detecting signs of awareness and communication in disorders of consciousness. Methods: We studied 13 patients with a minimally conscious state (MCS, 5 TBI – 8 anoxic, mean time post injury 70±109 months; mean age 42 ± 21) and 16 healthy controls (aged 45±19). Patients were evaluated using the Coma Recovery Scale Revised. 16-Channel EEG was recorded using a g.tec USBAmp amplifier. An auditory P300 four choice speller paradigm based on the BCI2000 system was used. Subjects were asked to answer yes or no to simple questions by paying attention to one out of four auditorily presented stimuli (‘yes’, ‘no’, ‘stop’, ‘go’). A trial constituted of 15 presentations of each sound the order of presentation being randomized. After a training session, patients and healthy subjects were required to answer 10 to 12 questions. A stepwise linear discriminant analysis based on the training session was used to classify the data. Offline, all training and testing trials were pooled and a leave-one-out approach was used to classify the data. Results: Healthy subjects presented a mean correct response rate of 73% online and 93% offline. Three MCS patients had a correct response rate of ≥50% offline (10, 18, 0% online and 50, 53, 57% offline). Two of these three patients did not show any command following at the bedside. The 10 remaining MCS cases showed online and offline correct answers <50% (mean 33±9% online and 25±13% offline). Conclusion: Our auditory P300-based BCI permitted functional interactive communication in 15/16 controls (online) and in all offline. Our data obtained in patients with disorders of consciousness demonstrate the potential clinical usefulness of the technique following coma but also show lower accuracy in patients as compared to healthy volunteers. This might be due to fluctuating attentional levels and exhaustibility in the MCS and to the suboptimal EEG recording quality due to movement, ocular and respiration artifacts in these challenging patients. [less ▲]

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See detailFunctional Neuroimaging Approaches to the Changing Borders of Consciousness
Noirhomme, Quentin ULg; Soddu, Andrea ULg; Vanhaudenhuyse, Audrey ULg et al

in Journal of Psychophysiology (2010), 24(2), 68-75

The bedside diagnosis of vegetative and minimally conscious patients is extremely challenging, and prediction of individual long-term outcome remains difficult. State-of the art neuroimaging methods could ... [more ▼]

The bedside diagnosis of vegetative and minimally conscious patients is extremely challenging, and prediction of individual long-term outcome remains difficult. State-of the art neuroimaging methods could help disentangle complex cases and offer new prognostic criteria. These methods can be divided into to three categories: First, new anatomical MRI neuroimaging methods, like diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) or spectroscopy, and passive functional imaging methods (looking at the brain’s activation induced by external stimuli), could provide new diagnostic and prognostic markers. Second, neuroimaging methods based on active collaboration from the patient could help to detect clinically unnoticed signs of consciousness. Third, developments in brain-computer interfaces based on EEG, functional MRI, or EMG offer communication possibilities in brain-damaged patients who can neither verbally nor nonverbally express their thoughts or wishes. These new approaches raise important issues not only from a clinical and ethical perspective (i.e., patients’ diagnosis, prognosis and management) but also from a neuroscientific standpoint, as they enrich our current understanding of the emergence and function of the conscious human mind. [less ▲]

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See detailA real time music synthesis environment driven with biological signals
Arslan, B.; Brouse, A.; Castet, J. et al

in Proceedings of the IEEE International Conference on Acoustics, Speech and Signal Processing, ICASSP 2006 (2006)

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See detailUsing physiological signals for sound creation
Filatriau, J. J.; Lehembre, Remy ULg; Noirhomme, Quentin ULg et al

in Proceedings of the 11-th International Conference Speech and Computer, SPECOM'2006 (2006)

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See detailKeeping track of the EEG's brain dynamics using Kalman filtering
Lehembre, Remy ULg; Noirhomme, Quentin ULg; Macq, B.

in Proceedings of the 3rd International BCI Workshop (2006)

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See detailFrom biological signals to music
Arslan, B.; Brouse, A.; Castet, J. et al

in Proceedings of the 2nd International Conference on Enactive Interfaces Enactive05 (2005)

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See detailA biologically-driven musical instrument
Arslan, B.; Brouse, A.; Castet, J. et al

in Proceedings of the 1st summer workshop on multimodal interfaces eNTERFACE05 (2005)

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