References of "Ledoux, Didier"
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See detailDIRECTED INFORMATION TRANSFER IN SCALP ELECTROENCEPHALOGRAPHIC RECORDINGS: INSIGHTS ON DISORDERS OF CONSCIOUSNESS
Marinazzo, Daniele; Gosseries, Olivia ULg; Boly, Mélanie ULg et al

in Clinical EEG and Neuroscience : Official Journal of the EEG and Clinical Neuroscience Society (ENCS) (2014)

Introduction: The neural mechanisms underlying electrophysiological changes observed in patients with disorders of consciousness following a coma remain poorly understood. The aim of this article is to ... [more ▼]

Introduction: The neural mechanisms underlying electrophysiological changes observed in patients with disorders of consciousness following a coma remain poorly understood. The aim of this article is to investigate the mechanisms underlying the differences in spontaneous electroencephalography between patients in vegetative/unresponsive wakefulness syndrome, minimally conscious state, emergence of the minimally conscious state and age-matched healthy control subjects. <br />Methods: Forty recording of spontaneous scalp electroencephalography were performed in 27 patients who were comatose on admission, and on healthy controls. Multivariate Granger Causality and Transfer Entropy were applied on the data. <br />Results: Distinctive patterns of putative bottlenecks of information were associated to each conscious state. Healthy controls are characterized by a greater amount of synergetic contributions from duplets of variables. <br />Conclusion: A novel set of measures was tested to get a novel insight on the pattern of information transfer in a network of scalp electrodes in patients with disorders of consciousness. [less ▲]

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See detailDoes comfort therapy during controlled donation after circulatory death shorten the life of potential donors?
LEDOUX, Didier ULg; DELBOUILLE, Marie-Hélène ULg; DE ROOVER, Arnaud ULg et al

in Clinical transplantation (2014), 28(1), 47-51

INTRODUCTION: Controlled donation after circulatory death (DCD) remains ethically controversial. The authors developed a controlled DCD protocol in which comfort therapy is regularly used. The aim of this ... [more ▼]

INTRODUCTION: Controlled donation after circulatory death (DCD) remains ethically controversial. The authors developed a controlled DCD protocol in which comfort therapy is regularly used. The aim of this study was to determine whether this policy shortens the DCD donors' life. METHODS: The authors retrospectively analyzed prospectively collected data on patients proposed for DCD at the University Hospital of Liege, Belgium, over a 56-month period. The survival duration of these patients, defined as duration between the time of proposal for DCD and the time of circulatory arrest, was compared between patients who actually donated organs and those who did not. RESULTS: About 128 patients were considered for controlled DCD and 54 (43%) became donors. Among the 74 non-donor patients, 34 (46%) objected to organ donation, 38 patients (51%) were denied by the transplant team for various medical reasons, and two potential DCD donors did not undergo procurement due to logistical and organizational reasons. The survival durations were similar in the DCD donor and non-donor groups. No non-donor patient survived. CONCLUSIONS: Survival of DCD donors is not shortened when compared with non-donor patients. These data support the ethical and respectful approach to potential DCD donors in the authors' center, including regular comfort therapy. [less ▲]

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See detailA More Than 20% Increase in Deceased-Donor Organ Procurement and Transplantation Activity After the Use of Donation After Circulatory Death.
Le Dinh, H.; MONARD, Josée ULg; DELBOUILLE, Marie-Hélène ULg et al

in Transplantation proceedings (2014), 46(1), 9-13

BACKGROUND: Organ procurement and transplant activity from controlled donation after circulatory death (DCD) was evaluated over an 11-year period to determine whether this program influenced the ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Organ procurement and transplant activity from controlled donation after circulatory death (DCD) was evaluated over an 11-year period to determine whether this program influenced the transplant and donation after brain death (DBD) activities. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Deceased donor (DD) procurement and transplant data were prospectively collected in a local database for retrospective review. RESULTS: There was an increasing trend in the potential and actual DCD numbers over time. DCD accounted for 21.9% of the DD pool over 11 years, representing 23.7% and 24.2% of the DD kidney and liver pool, respectively. The DBD retrieval and transplant activity increased during the same time period. Mean conversion rate turning potential into effective DCD donors was 47.3%. Mean DCD donor age was 54.6 years (range, 3-83). Donors >/=60 years old made up 44.1% of the DCD pool. Among referred donors, reasons for nondonation were medical contraindications (33.7%) and family refusals (19%). Mean organ yield per DCD donor was 2.3 organs. Mean total procurement warm ischemia time was 19.5 minutes (range, 6-39). In 2012, 17 DCD and 37 DBD procurements were performed in the Liege region, which has slightly >1 million inhabitants. CONCLUSIONS: This DCD program implementation enlarged the DD pool and did not compromise the development of DBD programs. The potential DCD pool might be underused and seems to be a valuable organ donor source. [less ▲]

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See detailDONATION AFTER CIRCULATORY DEATH INCREASES THE CADAVERIC DONOR POOL
Le Dinh, H.; DE ROOVER, Arnaud ULg; SQUIFFLET, Jean-Paul ULg et al

in Transplant International (2013, December), 26(S2), 54-101

Background: There is a controversy on the possibility to increase the organ donor pool by donation-after-circulatory-death (DCD) and the possible decrease in donation-after-brain-death (DBD) by DCD ... [more ▼]

Background: There is a controversy on the possibility to increase the organ donor pool by donation-after-circulatory-death (DCD) and the possible decrease in donation-after-brain-death (DBD) by DCD programs. Our aim is to report the DCD experience at the University Hospital of Liege, Belgium, from 2002 through 2012, in a donor region of about 1 million inhabitants. Methods: The prospective organ donor and recipient databases were retrospectively reviewed. Results: 94 and 331 procurements were performed from controlled DCD and DBD donors in the time period, respectively. DCD donors contributed to 22.1% of the deceased donor (DD) organ procurement activity from Jan 2002 to Dec 2012, and up to one-third annually since 2009. DCD liver and kidneys contributed 23.7% and 24.2% of the DD liver and kidney transplantation activity, respectively. There was no decrease of the DBD procurement in the study period. In 2012, overall 54 DD were procured in the Liege region, reaching a high procurement activity.Conclusions: Controlled DCD donors are a valuable source of transplantable liver and kidney grafts, and in our experience do not adversely affect DBD organ procurement activity. [less ▲]

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See detailHypovitaminose D du patient brûlé : une équation à plusieurs inconnues.
ROUSSEAU, Anne-Françoise ULg; LEDOUX, Didier ULg; DAMAS, Pierre ULg et al

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2013), 68(11), 574-578

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See detailCharacteristics of Near-Death Experiences Memories as Compared to Real and Imagined Events Memories
Thonnard, Marie ULg; Charland-Verville, Vanessa ULg; Brédart, Serge ULg et al

in PLoS ONE (2013), 8(3),

Since the dawn of time, Near-Death Experiences (NDEs) have intrigued and, nowadays, are still not fully explained. Since reports of NDEs are proposed to be imagined events, and since memories of imagined ... [more ▼]

Since the dawn of time, Near-Death Experiences (NDEs) have intrigued and, nowadays, are still not fully explained. Since reports of NDEs are proposed to be imagined events, and since memories of imagined event have, on average, fewer phenomenological characteristics than real events memories, we here compared phenomenological characteristics of NDEs reports with memories of imagined and real events. We included three groups of coma survivors (8 patients with NDE as defined by the Greyson NDE scale, 6 patients without NDE but with memory of their coma, 7 patients without memories of their coma) and a group of 18 age-matched healthy volunteers. Five types of memories were assessed using Memory Characteristics Questionnaire (MCQ – Johnson et al., 1988): target memory (NDE for NDE memory group, coma memory for coma memory group, and first childhood memory for no memory and control groups), old and recent real event memories and old and recent imagined event memories. Since NDEs are known to have high emotional content, participants were requested to choose the most emotionally salient memories for both real and imagined recent and old event memories. Results showed that, in NDE memories group, NDE memories have more characteristics than memories of imagined and real events (p<0.02). NDE memories contain more self-referential and emotional information and have better clarity than memories of coma (all p<0.02). The present study showed that NDE memories contain more characteristics than real event memories and coma memories. Thus, this suggests that they cannot be considered as imagined event memories. On the contrary, their physiological origins could lead them to be really perceived although not lived in the reality. Further work is needed to better understand this phenomenon. [less ▲]

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See detailWhat is the potential increase in the heart graft pool by cardiac donation after circulatory death?
Noterdaeme, Timothée; HANS, Marie-France ULg; NELLESSEN, Eric ULg et al

Conference (2013, February 09)

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See detailWhat is the potential increase in the heart graft pool by cardiac donation after circulatory death?
NOTERDAEME, Timothée; DETRY, Olivier ULg; HANS, Marie-France ULg et al

in Transplant International (2013), 26(1), 61-66

Heart transplantation remains the only definite treatment option for end-stage heart diseases. The use of hearts procured after donation after circulatory death (DCD) could help decrease the heart graft ... [more ▼]

Heart transplantation remains the only definite treatment option for end-stage heart diseases. The use of hearts procured after donation after circulatory death (DCD) could help decrease the heart graft shortage. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential increase in heart graft pool by developing DCD heart transplantation. We retrospectively reviewed our local donor database from 2006 to 2011, and screened the complete controlled DCD donor population for potential heart donors, using the same criteria as for donation after brain death (DBD) heart transplantation. Acceptable donation warm ischemic time (DWIT) was limited to 30 min. During this period 177 DBD and 70 DCD were performed. From the 177 DBD, a total of 70 (39.5%) hearts were procured and transplanted. Of the 70 DCD, eight (11%) donors fulfilled the criteria for heart procurement with a DWIT of under 30 min. Within the same period, 82 patients were newly listed for heart transplantation, of which 53 were transplanted, 20 died or were unlisted, and 9 were waiting. It could be estimated that 11% of the DCD might be heart donors, representing a 15% increase in heart transplant activity, as well as potential reduction in the deaths on the waiting list by 40%. [less ▲]

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See detailReduction in VAP incidence by subglottic secretion drainage and antibiotic consumption in ICU patients
VAN CAUWENBERGE, Isabelle ULg; ANCION, Arnaud ULg; LAMBERMONT, Bernard ULg et al

in Intensive Care Medicine (2013), 39(Suppl 2), 465-4660898

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See detailPain perception in disorders of consciousness: neuroscience, clinical care, and ethics in dialogue
Demertzi, Athina ULg; Racine, Eric; Bruno, Marie-Aurélie ULg et al

in Neuroethics (2013), 6(1), 37-50

Pain, suffering and positive emotions in patients in vegetative state/unresponsive wakefulness syndrome (VS/UWS) and minimally conscious states (MCS) pose clinical and ethical challenges. Clinically, we ... [more ▼]

Pain, suffering and positive emotions in patients in vegetative state/unresponsive wakefulness syndrome (VS/UWS) and minimally conscious states (MCS) pose clinical and ethical challenges. Clinically, we evaluate behavioural responses after painful stimulation and also emotionally-contingent behaviours (e.g., smiling). Using stimuli with emotional valence, neuroimaging and electrophysiology technologies can detect subclinical remnants of preserved capacities for pain which might influence decisions about treatment limitation. To date, no data exist as to how healthcare providers think about end-of-life options (e.g., withdrawal of artificial nutrition and hydration) in the presence or absence of pain in non-communicative patients. Here, we aimed to better clarify this issue by re-analyzing previously published data on pain perception (Prog Brain Res 2009 177, 329–38) and end-of-life decisions (J Neurol 2010 258, 1058–65) in patients with disorders of consciousness. In a sample of 2259 European healthcare professionals we found that, for VS/UWS more respondents agreed with treatment withdrawal when they considered that VS/UWS patients did not feel pain (77%) as compared to those who thought VS/UWS did feel pain (59%). This interaction was influenced by religiosity and professional background. For MCS, end-of-life attitudes were not influenced by opinions on pain perception. Within a contemporary ethical context we discuss (1) the evolving scientific understandings of pain perception and their relationship to existing clinical and ethical guidelines; (2) the discrepancies of attitudes within (and between) healthcare providers and their consequences for treatment approaches, and (3) the implicit but complex relationship between pain perception and attitudes toward life-sustaining treatments. [less ▲]

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See detailHypovitaminosis D and osteoporosis in burn patients: are the current practices enough ?
ROUSSEAU, Anne-Françoise ULg; LEDOUX, Didier ULg; DAMAS, Pierre ULg et al

in Osteoporosis International (2013), 24(Suppl 1), 377

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See detailWhat is the potential increase of the heart graft pool by cardiac donation after circulatory death?
NOTERDAEME, Timothée; NELLESSEN, Eric ULg; HANS, Marie-France ULg et al

in Transplantation (2012, November), 94

Background: Heart transplantation remains to date the only definite treatment option for end-stage heart diseases. Currently only heart procured from brain death (DBD) donors are used. Combined with an ... [more ▼]

Background: Heart transplantation remains to date the only definite treatment option for end-stage heart diseases. Currently only heart procured from brain death (DBD) donors are used. Combined with an increasing demand, the constant heart graft shortage leads to an increase of deaths on cardiac transplantation waiting lists. The use of hearts procured after donation after circulatory death (DCD) could help to partly decrease the heart graft shortage. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential increase of heart graft pool by development of DCD heart transplantation. Methods: The authors retrospectively reviewed their local donor database for the period 2006-2011, and screened the complete controlled DCD donor population for potential heart donors, using the same criteria as for DBD heart transplantation. The acceptable warm ischemic time (WIT) was limited to 30min from life support withdrawal to aortic cannulation. Results: During the analyzed timespan, 177 DBD and 70 DCD were effectively performed. From the 177 DBD, a total of 70 (39.5%) hearts were procured and transplanted locally or in another center. Out of the 70 DCD, 8 (11%) donors fulfilled the criteria for heart graft procurement and had a WIT of less than 30 minutes. During the same period, 82 patients were newly listed for heart transplantation, of which 53 were transplanted, 20 died or were unlisted, and 9 were still awaiting transplantation. Conclusions: Based on our database and a WIT of less than 30min, it could be estimated that 11% of the DCD might be heart graft donors, representing a 11% increase in heart graft procurement, as well as potential reduction of the deaths on the waiting list by 40%. [less ▲]

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See detailMemories of Near-Death experiences are they memories of imagined events?
Thonnard, Marie ULg; Charland-Verville, Vanessa ULg; Brédart, Serge ULg et al

Poster (2012, October 27)

Background: The phenomenon of Near-Death Experiences (NDEs) has always intrigued but is still not fully explained despite numerous theories and studies. Since reports of NDEs are proposed to be imagined ... [more ▼]

Background: The phenomenon of Near-Death Experiences (NDEs) has always intrigued but is still not fully explained despite numerous theories and studies. Since reports of NDEs are proposed to be imagined events (French, 2001), and since memories of imagined events have, on average, fewer phenomenological characteristics than real event memories (e.g. Johnson et al., 1988), we here compared phenomenological characteristics of NDEs reports with memories of imagined and real events. Methods: We included 3 groups of coma survivors (8 patients with NDE as defined by the Greyson NDE scale – the “NDE memory group”- , 6 patients without NDE but with memory of their coma – the “coma memory group” – and 7 patients without memories of their coma – the “no memory group”) and a group of 18 age-matched healthy volunteers. Five memories were assessed using Memory Characteristics Questionnaire (MCQ – Johnson et al., 1988): target memory (NDE for NDE memory group, coma memory for coma memory group, and first childhood memory for no memory and control groups), old and recent real event memories and old and recent imagined event memories. Results: In NDE group, NDE memories showd more characteristics than memories of imagined and real events (p<0.02). These memories contain more self-referential and emotional information and have better clarity than memories of coma (all p<0.02). Conclusion: The present study showed that NDE memories contain more characteristics than real event memories and coma memories. Thus, they cannot be considered as classic imagined event memories. On the contrary, their physiological origins could lead them to be really perceived although not lived in the reality. Further work is needed to better understand this phenomenon [less ▲]

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See detailAcute burn care : state of the art in Europe
ROUSSEAU, Anne-Françoise ULg; LEDOUX, Didier ULg; MASSION, Paul ULg et al

Poster (2012, September)

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See detailClinical sedation and bispectral index in burn children receiving gamma-hydroxybutyrate.
ROUSSEAU, Anne-Françoise ULg; LEDOUX, Didier ULg; SABOURDIN, Nada et al

in Paediatric Anaesthesia (2012), 22(8), 799-804

Background:  Gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB) may be an interesting hypnotic agent in burn patients because of its good respiratory or hemodynamic tolerance. However, its clinical and electroencephalographic ... [more ▼]

Background:  Gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB) may be an interesting hypnotic agent in burn patients because of its good respiratory or hemodynamic tolerance. However, its clinical and electroencephalographic (EEG) sedative effects are not yet described in children. The aim of this prospective and randomized study was to assess clinical and EEG effects of increasing intravenous (IV) doses of GHB in burn children requiring sedation for burn wound cares. Methods:  Thirty six children hospitalized in a burn care unit were included and randomly assigned into three groups (G) according to the single IV dose of GHB they received before burn wound care: 10 mg·kg(-1) in G10, 25 mg·kg(-1) in G25, or 50 mg·kg(-1) in G50. All patients received oral premedication (morphine and hydroxyzine) 30 min before GHB injection. Respiratory rate, heart rate, pulse oximetry, and bispectral index (BIS) were continuously monitored. Depth of sedation was clinically assessed using Observer's Assessment of Alertness and Sedation (OAAS) Score, every 2 min until recovery (i.e., OAAS = 4). Results:  Median age was 17.5 [12-34] months. Whatever the dose, BIS decreased after IV GHB. Nadir value of BIS was significantly lower in G25 and G50 than in G10, as was for OAAS score. Nadir values were reached after same delays in G25 and G50. Duration of sedation was dose-dependant. Conclusion:  Bispectral index decreased after GHB injection and was correlated with OAAS score. Deep sedation can be safely achieved with IV doses of 25 or 50 mg·kg(-1) , but the last dose was associated with prolonged duration of clinical sedation. [less ▲]

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See detailPrise en charge des brûlés en phase aigue : enquête européenne.
ROUSSEAU, Anne-Françoise ULg; LEDOUX, Didier ULg; MASSION, Paul ULg et al

in Brûlures. Revue Française de Brûlologie (2012, June), XIII(2), 60

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