References of "Leclercq, Bruno"
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See detailRéduire l’altérité au travers des processus de traduction et de représentation
Leclercq, Bruno ULg; Smette, Bernard ULg

in Doctorales. Revue LLA-SHS de Montpellier (in press)

WVO Quine questions the « myth » of an ideal realm of shared meanings which every national language would express in its own way. Against the hope of transparent translations, he insists on the necessity ... [more ▼]

WVO Quine questions the « myth » of an ideal realm of shared meanings which every national language would express in its own way. Against the hope of transparent translations, he insists on the necessity for building equivalences from one language to another through a strategy of reducing the differences in rationality among nations as much as possible. According to Quine, otherness is not insuperable impediment to meeting/encounter and mutual understanding ; by throwing our conceptual schemes on the other communities’ uses/practices – which of course involves some symbolic violence – gaps can always been narrowed. Similarly E. Laclau questions the traditional conception of political representation, which is seen as the transparent process of transmitting someone’s will or interests on another level. For this ideal conception of representation, Laclau substitutes a pragmatic conception which takes in account the irreducible gap between the actors as well as the constitutive opacity of the process of representation : the subject’s will is constituted within the process of representation and through the representative’s productive role. In order to be transposed at the decision-making level, the subject’s interests must be translated by the representative as well as be negotiated with the other represented interests. This implies that the initial will undergoes some identity transformations. [less ▲]

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See detailAre there synthetic a priori propositions ? The paradigmatic case of mathematics, from Kant to Frege and Peirce
Leclercq, Bruno ULg

in Petrov, Vesselin (Ed.) Mathematics in Philosophy (2016)

Bernard Bolzano notoriously rejected Immanuel Kant’s claim that arithmetic and geometry were grounded on synthetic a priori judgements based on pure intuition. According to Bolzano, only analysis of ... [more ▼]

Bernard Bolzano notoriously rejected Immanuel Kant’s claim that arithmetic and geometry were grounded on synthetic a priori judgements based on pure intuition. According to Bolzano, only analysis of concepts could ground the generality of mathematical statements and proofs; such a stand would later lead to logicism (from Frege to Carnap). Far from going in this way, however, Charles Sanders Peirce, who was one of the fathers of formal logic but also a great admirer of Kant, provided semiotic reasons to believe that diagrams do have a general meaning and that they can provide a knowledge which is both general and “ampliative”. Unlike mere logical analysis, diagrams (the analogon of Kant’s schemas) help to explore concepts by going somehow “outside of them” in such a way that new knowledge is gained. This provides new support to Kant’s notion of intuitive construction, which is supposed to be both deductive and inventive [less ▲]

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See detailIconic virtues of diagrams. Peirce and ampliative reasoning
Leclercq, Bruno ULg

Conference (2015, September 08)

In his Critic of pure reason, Immanuel Kant notoriously claimed that, being grounded on the forms of sense intuition, arithmetical and geometrical propositions are both synthetic (i.e. informative) and a ... [more ▼]

In his Critic of pure reason, Immanuel Kant notoriously claimed that, being grounded on the forms of sense intuition, arithmetical and geometrical propositions are both synthetic (i.e. informative) and a priori. Bernard Bolzano, followed in this by the logicist movement (from Gottlob Frege to Rudolf Carnap), answered that the generality and necessity of mathematical propositions and proofs can only be grounded on conceptual analysis. Even though, just like Frege, he is one of the fathers of formal logic, Charles Sanders Peirce provides some semiotic reasons to think that Kant was right: diagrams do convey general meanings and provide some knowledge which is necessary yet non-trivial. Unlike logical analysis, visual presentation of concepts in schemas or diagrams helps to explore concepts by stressing some of their “side” features in such a way that new knowledge is gained: « diagrams evolve what was involved » (CP4/86). This is why, according to Kant’s notion of intuitive construction, mathematical inferences are not merely deductive but are inventive and ampliative. My talk aims at identifying some iconic virtues of diagrams which, according to Peirce, explain their epistemic productivity. A first one lies in the “formal” nature of icons, which allows them to express syntactic relations between descriptive (symbols) and demonstrative (indices) components of structured information. On this respect, even algebraic and ideographic expressions are icons exhibiting a general form – a “rheme” – in which places for indices are filled with variables “x” and “y” meaning “any individual”. For this reason, even though they are singular, diagrams are “abstractions” in the sense that they represent relations rather than their terms. Only with this in prospect can a second, and more studied, feature of diagrams matter, namely their two-dimensionality, which helps to exhibit complex relations that cannot be seen on linear linguistic expressions. Finally, a third feature of diagrams lies in their imaginary rather than referential character. Icons connote without denoting, and therefore they can be informational without this information being limited to singular individuals. Furthermore, this non referential character of icons is what makes them open to virtual exploratory manipulations that allow to consider and investigate possibilities which in turn inform us on not obvious properties of the presently visible configuration. [less ▲]

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See detailQui sait ce que je veux dire ? Externalisme sémantique versus phénoménologie
Leclercq, Bruno ULg

Conference (2015, June 19)

L’objectivisme sémantique de Bolzano et Frege se présente d’abord comme une critique du psychologisme des théories modernes de la signification entendue comme idée, représentation ou image mentale ... [more ▼]

L’objectivisme sémantique de Bolzano et Frege se présente d’abord comme une critique du psychologisme des théories modernes de la signification entendue comme idée, représentation ou image mentale. Quoique solidaire de cette critique, Husserl entend bien, quant à lui, montrer que les significations sont néanmoins constituées dans des actes mentaux, les « intentions de signification ». En cela, il s’oppose au platonisme autant qu’au psychologisme. Or il en va exactement de même des thèses de Wittgenstein et Quine, qui, rejetant le(s) mythe(s) de la signification, insistent sur la constitution du sens dans les pratiques linguistiques. Mais l’assimilation du sens à l’usage social dépsychologise aussi les intentions de signification (le « vouloir dire » (meinen, mean)) ainsi que la « compréhension » (le « saisir » (begreifen, grasp)). A l’heure de l’externalisme (social mais aussi indexical), y a-t-il alors encore une place pour la phénoménologie en philosophie du langage ? [less ▲]

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See detailGrammaire matérielle et erreur de catégorie
Leclercq, Bruno ULg

Conference (2015, May 08)

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See detailRéputation scientifique et indicateurs de performance
Leclercq, Bruno ULg

Conference (2015, March 02)

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See detailLe conceivable et l’imaginable. Analyse conceptuelle et intuition éidétique
Leclercq, Bruno ULg

in Cercle Herméneutique (Le) (2015)

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See detailObjects and pseudo-objects. Ontological deserts and jungles from Brentano to Carnap
Leclercq, Bruno ULg; Richard, Sébastien; Seron, Denis ULg

Book published by De Gruyter (2015)

Which entities should we accepted as part of the furniture of the world, and which not? What are “pseudo-objects,” if they are not properly objects? This collection explores the answers given to these ... [more ▼]

Which entities should we accepted as part of the furniture of the world, and which not? What are “pseudo-objects,” if they are not properly objects? This collection explores the answers given to these questions by some key philosophers throughout the 20th century. It brings together essays by leading scholars on a subject of central importance to both metaphysics and the history of philosophy. [less ▲]

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See detailHusserl et Hilbert. Théorie des systèmes formels
Leclercq, Bruno ULg

in Pradelle, Dominique; Lavigne, Jean-François (Eds.) Monde, structures, objets de pensée (2015)

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See detailThe object and its concept are (not) one and the same. The functional view of higher order objects in Carnap’s work
Leclercq, Bruno ULg

in Leclercq, Bruno; Richard, Sébastien; Seron, Denis (Eds.) Objects and pseudo-objects. Ontological deserts and jungles from Brentano to Carnap (2015)

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See detailFondements logiques et phénoménologiques de la rationalité mathématique chez Husserl. Contributions husserliennes au débat sur la « crise des fondements »
Leclercq, Bruno ULg

Book published by Vrin (2015)

Formé en mathématiques par Kronecker et Weierstraß, puis en psychologie par Brentano et Stumpf, évalué par Cantor, critique de Schröder, correspondant de Frege, collègue de Hilbert, maître de Weyl et ... [more ▼]

Formé en mathématiques par Kronecker et Weierstraß, puis en psychologie par Brentano et Stumpf, évalué par Cantor, critique de Schröder, correspondant de Frege, collègue de Hilbert, maître de Weyl et Becker, Edmund Husserl est l’exact contemporain des débats célèbres qui ont opposé positions psychologistes, logicistes, intuitionnistes et formalistes au cours de ce qu’on a appelé la « crise des fondements » des mathématiques. Initié sur le terrain de l’arithmétique, puis très vite confronté à ces « fines fleurs de la mathématique moderne » que sont la théorie des systèmes de nombres, la théorie des géométries de Riemann ou la théorie des groupes de transformation de Lie, son projet phénoménologique vise à rendre compte du type de signification et d’intuitivité que peuvent revendiquer des « objets » dont la connaissance est médiée par leurs rapports rationnels les uns aux autres. Or, après s’être montré sensible aux arguments de ses différents interlocuteurs et avoir ponctuellement adopté certaines de leurs positions, ce sont en définitive des thèses formalistes que Husserl va tout à la fois défendre et s’efforcer d’élucider par des analyses constitutives statiques puis génétiques. [less ▲]

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See detailLa réduction phénoménologique : démarche critique ou fondationnaliste ?
Leclercq, Bruno ULg

Conference (2014, November 27)

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See detailReasoning about fiction
Leclercq, Bruno ULg

Scientific conference (2014, May 22)

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