References of "Lecchini, David"
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See detailSound Characteristics and Complex Sonic Apparatus Morphologies in Two Ophidiiformes: Ophidion rochei (Ophidiidae) and Onuxodon fowleri (Carapidae)
Kever, Loïc ULg; Colleye, Orphal ULg; Lecchini, David et al

Conference (2013, July 14)

Ophidiiformes show complex and highly diverse sonic apparatus morphologies allowing them a great variety of calls. Some Ophidion (Ophidiidae) and all Onuxodon (Carapidae) species have in common, at the ... [more ▼]

Ophidiiformes show complex and highly diverse sonic apparatus morphologies allowing them a great variety of calls. Some Ophidion (Ophidiidae) and all Onuxodon (Carapidae) species have in common, at the front of the swimbladder, a mineralized structure called rocker bone. According to morphological observations, it probably results from adaptive convergence. Its evolutionary advantage remains however to be determined. Sonic apparatus morphology and sound characteristics were examined in Ophidion rochei from Dùlce-Glàva (Croatia) and in Onuxodon fowleri from Makemo (French Polynesia). The rocker bone is only present in males in O. rochei but in both sexes in O. fowleri. Onuxodon fowleri and male O. rochei produce calls that often last more than 1 s. Calls are composed of 1 to 41 pulses lasting for 21±10 ms in O. fowleri and 1 to 55 pulses lasting for 16±13 ms in O. rochei. Mean pulse periods are also relatively long, ca. 95 ms and 125 ms, respectively. Females of O. rochei produce short (ca. 20 ms) hum-like sounds that are characterized by shorter pulses (mean duration: 0.7±0.2 ms) and higher pulse rates (mean pulse period: 4±1 ms). Differences in sound characteristics are likely due to the rocker bone that most probably evolved in response to mechanical constraints acting on the swimbladder in O. fowleri and male O. rochei. Its presence suggests a sustained sound production was crucial in their evolutionary success. However, the sexual dimorphism observed in O. rochei but not in O. fowleri suggests differences in way of life. [less ▲]

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See detailFish larvae prefer coral over algal water cues: implications of coral reef degradation
Lecchini, David; Waqalevu, Viliam; Parmentier, Eric ULg et al

in Marine Ecology. Progress Series (2013), 475

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See detailEffects of alternate reef states on coral reef fish habitat associations
Lecchini, David; Carassou, Laure; Frederich, Bruno ULg et al

in Environmental Biology of Fishes (2012), 94(2), 421-429

The present study describes ontogenetic shifts in habitat use for 15 species of coral reef fish at Rangiroa Atoll, French Polynesia. The distribution of fish in different habitats at three ontogenetic ... [more ▼]

The present study describes ontogenetic shifts in habitat use for 15 species of coral reef fish at Rangiroa Atoll, French Polynesia. The distribution of fish in different habitats at three ontogenetic stages (new settler, juvenile, and adult) was investigated in coral- dominated and algal-dominated sites at two reefs (fringing reef and inner reef of motu). Three main ontogenetic patterns in habitat use were identified: (1) species that did not change habitats between new settler and juvenile life stages (60% of species) or between juvenile and adult stages (55% of species—no ontoge- netic shift); (2) species that changed habitats at different ontogenetic stages (for the transition “new settler to juvenile stage”: 15% of species; for the transition “juvenile to adult stage”: 20% of species); and (3) species that increased the number of habitats they used over ontogeny (for the transition “new settler to juvenile stage”: 25% of species; for the transition “juvenile to adult stage”: 25% of species). Moreover, the majority of studied species (53%) showed a spatial variability in their ontogenetic pattern of habitat use according to alternate reef states (coral reef vs algal reef), suggesting that reef state can influence the dynamics of habitat associations in coral reef fish. [less ▲]

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See detailMismatch between shape changes and ecological shifts during the post-settlement growth of the surgeonfish, Acanthurus triostegus
Frederich, Bruno ULg; Colleye, Orphal ULg; Lepoint, Gilles ULg et al

in Frontiers in Zoology (2012), 9

Background: Many coral reef fishes undergo habitat and diet shifts during ontogeny. However, studies focusing on the physiological and morphological adaptations that may prepare them for these transitions ... [more ▼]

Background: Many coral reef fishes undergo habitat and diet shifts during ontogeny. However, studies focusing on the physiological and morphological adaptations that may prepare them for these transitions are relatively scarce. Here, we explored the body shape variation related to ontogenetic shifts in the ecology of the surgeonfish Acanthurus triostegus (Acanthuridae) from new settler to adult stages at Moorea Island (French Polynesia). Specifically, we tested the relationship between diet and habitat shifts and changes in overall body shape during the ontogeny of A. triostegus using a combination of geometric morphometric methods, stomach contents and stable isotope analysis. Results: After reef settlement, stable isotope composition of carbon and nitrogen revealed a change from a zooplanktivorous to a benthic algae diet. The large amount of algae (> 75% of stomach contents) found in the digestive tract of small juveniles (25–30 mm SL) suggested the diet shift is rapid. The post-settlement growth of A. triostegus is highly allometric. The allometric shape changes mainly concern cephalic and pectoral regions. The head becomes shorter and more ventrally oriented during growth. Morphological changes are directly related to the diet shift given that a small mouth ventrally oriented is particularly suited for grazing activities at the adult stage. The pectoral fin is more anteriorely and vertically positioned and its basis is larger in adults than in juveniles. This shape variation had implications for swimming performance, manoeuvrability, turning ability and is related to habitat shift. Acanthurus triostegus achieves its main transformation of body shape to an adult-like form at size of 35–40 mm SL. Conclusion: Most of the shape changes occurred after the reef colonization but before the transition between juvenile habitat (fringing reef) and adult habitat (barrier reef). A large amount of allometric variation was observed after diet shift from zooplankton to benthic algae. Diet shift could act as an environmental factor favouring or inducing morphological changes. On the other hand, the main shape changes have to be achieved before the recruitment to adult populations and start negotiating the biophysical challenges of locomotion and feeding in wave- and current-swept outer reef habitat. [less ▲]

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See detailInterspecific variation of calls in clownfishes: degree of similarity in closely related species
Colleye, Orphal ULg; Vandewalle, Pierre ULg; Lanterbecq, Déborah et al

in BMC Evolutionary Biology (2011), 11

Clownfishes are colorful coral reef fishes living in groups in association with sea anemones throughout the Indo-Pacific Ocean. Within their small societies, size hierarchy determines which fish have ... [more ▼]

Clownfishes are colorful coral reef fishes living in groups in association with sea anemones throughout the Indo-Pacific Ocean. Within their small societies, size hierarchy determines which fish have access to reproduction. These fishes are also prolific callers whose aggressive sounds seem to play an important role in the social hierarchy. Agonistic interactions being involved in daily behaviour suggest how acoustic communication might play an important role in clownfish group. Sounds were recorded and compared in fourteen clownfish species (some of which have never been recorded before) to evaluate the potential role of acoustic communication as an evolutionary driving force. Surprisingly, the relationship between fish size and both dominant frequency and pulse duration is not only species-specific; all the specimens of the 14 species are situated on exactly the same slope, which means the size of any Amphiprion can be predicted by both acoustic features. The number of pulses broadly overlaps among species, whereas the pulse period displays the most variation even if it shows overlap among sympatric species. Sound comparisons between three species (A. akallopisos, A. ocellaris and A. frenatus) having different types of teeth and body shape do not show differences neither in the acoustic waveform nor in the power spectrum. Significant overlap in acoustic features demonstrates that the sound-producing mechanism is highly conservative among species. Differences in the calls of some species are due to size dimorphism and the sound variation might be in this case a by-product. This morphological constraint does not permit a consideration of acoustic communication as the main driving force in the diversification of clownfishes. Moreover, calls are not produced to find mate and consequently are less subject to variations due to partner preference, which restricts the constraints of diversification. Calls are produced to reach and defend the competition to mate access. However, differences in the pulse period between cohabiting species show that, in some case, sounds can help to differentiate the species, to prevent competition between cohabiting species and to promote the diversification of taxa. [less ▲]

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See detailComparative study on sound production in different Holocentridae species
Parmentier, Eric ULg; Vandewalle, Pierre ULg; Brié, Christophe et al

in Frontiers in Zoology (2011), 8

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See detailSound production and mechanism in Heniochus chrysostomus (Chaetodontidae)
Parmentier, Eric ULg; Boyle, Kelly; Berten, Laetitia ULg et al

in Journal of Experimental Biology (2011), 214

The diversity in calls and sonic mechanisms appears to be important in Chaetodontidae. Calls in Chaetodon multicinctus seem to include tail slap, jump, pelvic fin flick and dorsal–anal fin erection ... [more ▼]

The diversity in calls and sonic mechanisms appears to be important in Chaetodontidae. Calls in Chaetodon multicinctus seem to include tail slap, jump, pelvic fin flick and dorsal–anal fin erection behaviors. Pulsatile sounds are associated with dorsal elevation of the head, anterior extension of the ventral pectoral girdle and dorsal elevation of the caudal skeleton in Forcipiger flavissiumus. In Hemitaurichthys polylepis, extrinsic swimbladder muscles could be involved in sounds originating from the swimbladder and correspond to the inward buckling of tissues situated dorsally in front of the swimbladder. These examples suggest that this mode of communication could be present in other members of the family. Sounds made by the pennant bannerfish (Heniochus chrysostomus) were recorded for the first time on coral reefs and when fish were hand held. In hand-held fishes, three types of calls were recorded: isolated pulses (51%), trains of four to 11 pulses (19%) and trains preceded by an isolated pulse (29%). Call frequencies were harmonic and had a fundamental frequency between 130 and 180Hz. The fundamental frequency, sound amplitude and sound duration were not related to fish size. Data from morphology, sound analysis and electromyography recordings highlight that the calls are made by extrinsic sonic drumming muscles in association with the articulated bones of the ribcage. The pennant bannerfish system differs from other Chaetodontidae in terms of sound characteristics, associated body movements and, consequently, mechanism. [less ▲]

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See detailEvidence of an original scale development during the settlement phase of a coral reef fish (Acanthurus triostegus)
Frederich, Bruno ULg; Lecchini, David; Vandewalle, Pierre ULg

in Journal of Applied Ichthyology (2010), 26

As the majority of coral reef fishes, the Convict Surgeonfish Acanthurus triostegus (Acanthuridae) has a complex life cycle that involves an ontogenetic change in morphology, physiology and behaviour as ... [more ▼]

As the majority of coral reef fishes, the Convict Surgeonfish Acanthurus triostegus (Acanthuridae) has a complex life cycle that involves an ontogenetic change in morphology, physiology and behaviour as its pelagic larval stage colonizes the benthic habitat. Few studies are devoted to the changes in skeleton during the settlement phase of coral reef fishes. In the present study, we highlighted an unexpected scales development in A. trisostegus just after the reef settlement. At settlement (t0), A. triostegus showed calcified and very thin vertical plates, lying in the dermis on the whole body. During the first 9 days after settlement, thin vertical plates regressed and adult scales began to appear simultaneously. At 12 days post-settlement, the whole body was covered with small scales. Overall, such a rapid skeletal transformation is an example of morphological changes dealing with metamorphosis of coral reef fishes. [less ▲]

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See detailDeveloping an acoustic map of the north coast of moorea, French Polynesia: a roadmap for settling larvae
Berten, Laetitia ULg; Lecchini, David; Simpson, Steve et al

Poster (2010)

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See detailColour differentiation in a coral reef fish throughout ontogeny: habitat background and flexibility
Frederich, Bruno ULg; Mills, Suzanne C.; Denoël, Mathieu ULg et al

in Aquatic Biology (2010), 9(3), 271-277

Colour polymorphism is widespread in animals but, in contrast to other types of polymorphism, has been little explored during ontogeny. Among coral reef fish, the surge damselfish Chrysiptera leucopoma ... [more ▼]

Colour polymorphism is widespread in animals but, in contrast to other types of polymorphism, has been little explored during ontogeny. Among coral reef fish, the surge damselfish Chrysiptera leucopoma settles in the larval stage as a yellow morph, whereas 2 colour morphs (yellow and brown) are apparent in adults at Rangiroa Atoll, French Polynesia. To understand this dimorphism, we tested, under controlled conditions, the hypotheses that: (1) environmental cues (habitat background and conspecific density) play important roles in morph differentiation during ontogeny and (2) morph colouration is reversible. Our first experiment showed that a dark habitat background induced the formation of the brown morph, while C. leucopoma larvae kept their yellow morph when placed in aquaria with a bright habitat background. Colour change from yellow to brown also occurred within the bright habitat, but only at high conspecific densities. Our second experiment showed that colour change was reversible within 15 d post-settlement, but not at the adult stage. Overall, our results highlighted that the studied polymorphism may be environmentally induced and reversible during the first post-settlement days of this coral reef fish. [less ▲]

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See detailDiversity and complexity in the acoustic behaviour of Dacyllus flavicaudus (Pomacentridae)
Parmentier, Eric ULg; Kever, Loïc ULg; Casadevall, Margardia et al

in Marine Biology (2010), 157(10), 2317-2327

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See detailVariations in sound production in <i>Dascyllus flavicaudus<i>
Kever, Loïc ULg; Lecchini, David; Parmentier, Eric ULg

Poster (2009, October)

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See detailEvidence of an atypical scale development during the settlement phase of a coral reef fish
Frederich, Bruno ULg; Lecchini, David; Vandewalle, Pierre ULg

Poster (2009, April)

As the majority of coral reef fishes, the Convict Surgeonfish Acanthurus triostegus (Acanthuridae) has a complex life cycle that involves an ontogenetic change in morphology, physiology and behaviour as ... [more ▼]

As the majority of coral reef fishes, the Convict Surgeonfish Acanthurus triostegus (Acanthuridae) has a complex life cycle that involves an ontogenetic change in morphology, physiology and behaviour as its pelagic larval stage colonizes the benthic habitat. Abrupt and spectacular changes in skeletal structures occurring when a fish takes on its juvenile form were highlighted in flatfish, bonefish, tarpon, eels, pearlfish and lampreys. However, few studies are devoted to the changes in skeleton during the settlement period of demersal coral reef fishes. In the present study conducted at Rangiroa Atoll (French Polynesia), we highlight an unexpected scales development in A. trisostegus during a fifteen days period just after the reef settlement. Fish was collected during the settlement and reared in aquaria. The osseous skeleton was displayed by a standard Alizarin red S staining technique. At settlement (t0) (SL = 22-25 mm), A. triostegus showed calcified and very long plates, lying in the dermis on the whole body. After three days, some small scales developed on the caudal peduncle. The plates seemed unchanged from the head to the pectoral girdle but were thinner on the trunk. The thin plates are pricked with whitish spots, which seem to indicate a poorer fixation of the alizarin corresponding to a decalcification process. Six days after the settlement, the squamation extended anteriorly to the pectoral girdle by the addition of new scales. Thin plates were always present on the head. Then the density of scales rapidly increased along the trunk during the following three days. The scales appeared on the head nine days after the settlement. Clearly, the plates do not transform into scales. The plates disappearance and the scales appearance appear as two parallel phenomena in the development. [less ▲]

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See detailSound production in four damselfish (Dascyllus) species: phyletic relationships?
Parmentier, Eric ULg; Lecchini, David; Frederich, Bruno ULg et al

in Biological Journal of the Linnean Society (2009), 97

Most studies of fish sounds show that the sounds are species-specific, with unique spectral and timing characteristics. This raises the question as to whether these sounds can be used to understand ... [more ▼]

Most studies of fish sounds show that the sounds are species-specific, with unique spectral and timing characteristics. This raises the question as to whether these sounds can be used to understand phyletic relationships between species and which acoustic parameters are subject to variation between species. In the present study, 597 sounds (and 2540 pulses) related to signal jumps of four Dascyllus species (Dascyllus aruanus, Dascyllus trimaculatus, Dascyllus albisella, and Dascyllus flavicaudus) from different geographic regions (Madagascar, Moorea, Rangiroa, and Hawaii) were analysed. It was possible to discern species-specific sounds, but also variation in sounds between populations. Large variations in sound length were found between Dascyllus species, whereas differences in interpulse duration were found to be variable between populations. In the regions where species live in sympatry, it appears that they restrict the variability in their sounds. This could comprise evidence of adaptation with character displacement of sonic characteristics where different species co-occur. However, sonic characteristics still overlapped substantially between species, suggesting that females would need to sample more than one sound and potentially use other cues to discriminate between species. [less ▲]

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See detailOntogenetic determinism of colour polymorphism in a coral reef fish, Chrysiptera brownriggii (Pomacentridae)
Frederich, Bruno ULg; Brié, Christophe; Santos, Raphael et al

Poster (2008, October)

The determinism of ontogenetic colour changes induced by environmental factors is poorly understood in marine fishes, especially in coral ecosystems. The present study, conducted at the Rangiroa Atoll ... [more ▼]

The determinism of ontogenetic colour changes induced by environmental factors is poorly understood in marine fishes, especially in coral ecosystems. The present study, conducted at the Rangiroa Atoll (French Polynesia) explored the effects of fish density and brightness/darkness condition (type of background) on colour determination during the ontogeny of a territorial damselfish Chrysiptera brownriggii (Bennett 1828). In this species, larvae always colonize the reef (settlement) in a yellow morph, while juveniles and adults can display two distinct colour-patterns: yellow and dark brown. Our experiments in aquaria showed that a significant higher proportion of C. brownriggii larvae turned into the brown morph in a dark condition during a period of 5 and 15 days (70-100% of brown morph induction) just after reef settlement. A significant positive effect of fish density inducing a brown colour morph was also highlighted. After a first colour induction, reversibility experiments illustrated that juveniles can change their colour morph anew after a 5-day period. Although a shift from brown to yellow morph seemed to be more limited. In the dark condition, yellow adults did not change their colour after a 5-day period. Our results showed that the colour dimorphism in C. brownriggii should be density-dependent. The period of sensitivity seems to last throughout the post-settlement period. We suggest that the yellow morph in C. brownriggii can be viewed as a paedomorphic trait. Overall, our results reveal that a darkness/lightness environment and fish density are environmental cues related to colour determinism in the polyphenetic C. brownriggii. [less ▲]

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See detailOntogenic and ecological control of metamorphosis onset in a carapid fish, Carapus homei: Experimental evidence from vertebra and otolith comparisons
Parmentier, Eric ULg; Lecchini, David; Lagardere, Françoise et al

in Journal of Experimental Zoology. Part A, Comparative Experimental Biology (2004), 301A(8), 617-628

In Carapus homei, reef colonisation is associated with a penetration inside a sea cucumber followed by heavy transformations during which the length of the fish is reduced by 60%. By comparing vertebral ... [more ▼]

In Carapus homei, reef colonisation is associated with a penetration inside a sea cucumber followed by heavy transformations during which the length of the fish is reduced by 60%. By comparing vertebral axis to otolith ontogenetic changes, this study aimed (i) to specify the events linked to metamorphosis, and (ii) to establish to what extent these fish have the ability to delay it. Different larvae of C. homei were caught when settling on the reef and kept in different experimental conditions for at least 7 days and up to 21 days: darkness or natural light conditions, presence of sea cucumber or not, and food deprivation or not. Whatever the nutritional condition, a period of darkness seems sufficient to initiate metamorphosis. Twenty-one days in natural light conditions delayed metamorphosis, whereas the whole metamorphosis process is the fastest (15 days) for larvae living in sea cucumbers. Whether the metamorphosis was initiated or not, otoliths were modified with the formation of a transition zone, whose structure varied depending on the experimental conditions. At day 21, larvae maintained in darkness had an otolith transition zone with more increments (around 80), albeit wider than those (more or less 21) of individuals kept under natural lighting. These differences in otolith growth could indicate an increased incorporation rate of released metabolites by metamorphosing larvae. However, the presence of a transition zone in delayed-metamorphosis larvae suggests that these otolith changes record the endogenously-induced onset of metamorphosis, whereas body transformations seem to be modulated by the environmental conditions of settlement. (C) 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc. [less ▲]

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See detailRemodelling of the vertebral axis during metamorphic shrinkage in the pearlfish
Parmentier, Eric ULg; Lecchini, David; Vandewalle, Pierre ULg

in Journal of Fish Biology (2004), 64(1), 159-169

Body shortening was observed in the pearlfish Carapus homei during metamorphosis. The tenuis larva at first possessed a suite of osseous vertebral bodies of similar length. The reduction in both the ... [more ▼]

Body shortening was observed in the pearlfish Carapus homei during metamorphosis. The tenuis larva at first possessed a suite of osseous vertebral bodies of similar length. The reduction in both the number and size of vertebrae followed increasing decalcification, degeneration of organic tissue and shortening. This involved a complete degradation and disappearance of the caudal tip vertebrae, and there was a reduction in the size of most of the remaining vertebrae. The further development of the vertebrae began with ossification of the neural and haemal arches before that of the vertebral body. This second part of the development followed a gradient: a gradual decreases towards the caudal tip in the size of the vertebrae and their completeness. (C) 2004 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles. [less ▲]

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