References of "Lecchini, David"
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See detailSound Production in Damselfishes
Parmentier, Eric ULg; Lecchini, David; Mann, David

in Frederich, Bruno; Parmentier, Eric (Eds.) Meet the Damselfishes (in press)

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See detailBrain lateralization involved in visual recognition of conspecifics in coral reef fish at recruitment
Roux, Natacha; Duran, Emilio; Lanyon, Rynae G. et al

in Animal Behaviour (2016), 117

In vertebrates, brain functional asymmetries are widespread and increase brain performance. Some species of fishes are known to have brain asymmetries; however, little information is available on brain ... [more ▼]

In vertebrates, brain functional asymmetries are widespread and increase brain performance. Some species of fishes are known to have brain asymmetries; however, little information is available on brain lateralization in coral reef fishes and the impact this could have during the recruitment phase. In this study, soldierfish, Myripristis pralinia, at the larval and juvenile stage recognized conspecifics through visual cues. Larvae with the ablation of either the right or left telencephalic hemisphere lost the attraction towards conspecific cues. In contrast, juveniles with the ablation of the right (but not left) telencephalic hemisphere still displayed a preference towards conspecific visual cues. These results suggest the left telencephalic hemisphere is responsible for the lateralization process used in the visual recognition of coral reef fish juveniles. The determinism of lateralized perception of conspecifics during fish ontogeny may be a consequence of genetic factors, linked with the metamorphosis processes and/or environmental factors such as predation at recruitment. [less ▲]

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See detailNew insights into sound production in Carapus mourlani (Carapidae)
Parmentier, Eric ULg; Colleye, Orphal ULg; Lecchini, David

in Bulletin of Marine Science (2016), 92(3),

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See detailEffect of evolutionary miniaturization on the tempo and mode of diversification - An example from marine angelfishes
Frederich, Bruno ULg; Santini, Francesco; Konow, Nicolai et al

Conference (2015, October 09)

Evolutionary change in body size is a widespread phenomenon in animals. Numerous studies have highlighted evolutionary miniaturization, referring to the evolution of small body size, in various taxa. As ... [more ▼]

Evolutionary change in body size is a widespread phenomenon in animals. Numerous studies have highlighted evolutionary miniaturization, referring to the evolution of small body size, in various taxa. As other traits shift, decrease in size can be viewed as a morphological novelty that enables colonization of new “adaptive zones” and subsequent diversification (i.e. a “key innovation”). Thus, evolution to small body size is hypothesized to influence lineage, morphological and ecological diversification. Until now, few studies have tested this hypothesis and current supports are mixed. Here, we present a quantitative analysis of the radiation of Pomacanthidae (angelfishes), an iconic coral reef fish family where small taxa, the so called “pygmy angelfishes” of the genus Centropyge, appear to have evolved three-times. If an evolutionary decrease in size has acted as a key innovation during the evolutionary history of Pomacanthidae, we predict that diversification rates would be the highest in clades of pygmy angelfishes. We produced a time-calibrated phylogeny including 67 species, collected ecological data and quantified the body shape of 80 species using geometric morphometrics. Then, we tested the prediction by modelling macroevolutionary dynamics of diversification using the Bayesian Analysis of Macroevolutionary Mixture (BAMM) framework. BAMM results do not support a common macroevolutionary regime for every pigmy angelfish clades. Only the clade Centropyge Xiphypops shows higher rates of lineage and morphological diversification than the other clades of angelfishes. We show that miniaturization has few effects on the rate of diversification. The shifts in the tempo of diversification observed in C. Xiphypops might instead be related to a functional innovation of the feeding apparatus. Using the Pomacanthidae, we illustrate that miniaturization may not be a main factor in triggering increased of diversification rates at the family level. [less ▲]

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See detailTemporal and spatial comparisons of underwater sound signatures of different reef habitats in Moorea Island, French Polynesia
Bertucci, Frédéric; Parmentier, Eric ULg; Berten, Laetitia et al

in PLoS ONE (2015)

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See detailComparison of isotopic turnover dynamics in two different muscles of a coral reef fish during the settlement phase
Gajdzik, Laura ULg; Lepoint, Gilles ULg; Lecchini, David et al

in Scientia Marina (2015), 79(3), 325-333

The temporal variation in carbon and nitrogen isotopic compositions (noted as δ13C and δ15N) was investigated in the convict surgeonfish (Acanthurus triostegus) at Moorea (French Polynesia). Over a period ... [more ▼]

The temporal variation in carbon and nitrogen isotopic compositions (noted as δ13C and δ15N) was investigated in the convict surgeonfish (Acanthurus triostegus) at Moorea (French Polynesia). Over a period of 24 days, juveniles were reared in aquaria and subjected to two different feeding treatments: granules or algae. The dynamics of δ13C and δ15N in two muscles (the adductor mandibulae complex and the epaxial musculature) having different functions were compared. At the end of experiments, a steady-state isotopic system in each muscle tissue was not reached. Especially for the algal treatment, we found different patterns of variation in isotopic compositions over time between the two muscles. The turnovers of δ13C showed opposite trends for each muscle but differences are mitigated by starvation and by the metamorphosis. Our study highlighted that the metabolism of coral reef fish may be subjected to catabolism or anabolism of non-protein precursors at settlement, inducing variation in isotopic compositions that are not linked to diet change. [less ▲]

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See detailChemical spying in coral reef fish larvae at recruitment
Roux, Natacha; Brooker, Rohan M.; Lecellier, Gaël et al

in Comptes Rendus Biologies (2015), 338

When fish larvae recruit back to a reef, chemical cues are often used to find suitable habitat or to find juvenile or adult conspecifics. We tested if the chemical information used by larvae was ... [more ▼]

When fish larvae recruit back to a reef, chemical cues are often used to find suitable habitat or to find juvenile or adult conspecifics. We tested if the chemical information used by larvae was intentionally produced by juvenile and adult conspecifics already on the reef (communication process) or whether the cues used result from normal biochemical processes with no active involvement by conspecifics (‘‘spying’’ behavior by larvae). Conspecific chemical cues attracted the majority of larvae (four out of the seven species tested); although while some species were equally attracted to cues from adults and juveniles (Chromis viridis, Apogon novemfasciatus), two exhibited greater sensitivity to adult cues (Pomacentrus pavo, Dascyllus aruanus). Our results indicate also that spying cues are those most commonly used by settling fishes (C. viridis, P. pavo, A. novemfasciatus). Only one species (D. aruanus) preferred the odour of conspecifics that had had visual contact with larvae (communication). [less ▲]

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See detailFrom the ocean to a reef habitat: How do the larvae of coral reef fishes find their way home? A state of art on the latest advances
Barth, P; Berenshtein, I; Besson, M et al

in Vie et Milieu (2015), 65(2), 91-100

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See detailLarge scale acoustic survey as a new tool for the evaluation of coral reef biodiversity (Moorea, French Polynesia)
Bertucci, Frédéric; Lecchini, David; Parmentier, Eric ULg

Conference (2015)

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See detailThe influence of various reef sounds on coral-fish larvae behaviour
Parmentier, Eric ULg; Berten, Laetitia; Rigo, Pierre ULg et al

in Journal of Fish Biology (2015)

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See detailSound production in Onuxodon fowleri (Carapidae) and its amplification by the host shell
Kever, Loïc ULg; Colleye, Orphal ULg; Lugli, Marco et al

in Journal of Experimental Biology (2014), 217

Onuxodon species are well known for living inside pearl oysters. As in other carapids, their anatomy highlights their ability to make sounds but sound production has never been documented in Onuxodon ... [more ▼]

Onuxodon species are well known for living inside pearl oysters. As in other carapids, their anatomy highlights their ability to make sounds but sound production has never been documented in Onuxodon. This paper describes sound production in Onuxodon fowleri as well as the anatomy of the sound production apparatus. Single-pulsed sounds and multiple-pulsed sounds that sometimes last more than 3 s were recorded in the field and in captivity (Makemo Island, French Polynesia). These pulses are characterized by a broadband frequency spectrum from 100 to 1000 Hz. Onuxodon fowleri is mainly characterized by its ability to modulate the pulse period, meaning that this species can produce pulsed sounds and tonal-like sounds using the same mechanism. In addition, the sound can be remarkably amplified by the shell cavity (peak gain can exceed 10 dB for some frequencies). The sonic apparatus of O. fowleri is characterized by a rocker bone in front of the swimbladder, modified vertebrae and epineurals, and two pairs of sonic muscles, one of which (primary sonic muscle) inserts on the rocker bone. The latter structure, which is absent in other carapid genera, appears to be sexually dimorphic suggesting differences in sound production in males and females. Sound production in O. fowleri could be an example of adaptation where an animal exploits features of its environment to enhance communication. [less ▲]

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See detailSound Characteristics and Complex Sonic Apparatus Morphologies in Two Ophidiiformes: Ophidion rochei (Ophidiidae) and Onuxodon fowleri (Carapidae)
Kever, Loïc ULg; Colleye, Orphal ULg; Lecchini, David et al

Conference (2013, July 14)

Ophidiiformes show complex and highly diverse sonic apparatus morphologies allowing them a great variety of calls. Some Ophidion (Ophidiidae) and all Onuxodon (Carapidae) species have in common, at the ... [more ▼]

Ophidiiformes show complex and highly diverse sonic apparatus morphologies allowing them a great variety of calls. Some Ophidion (Ophidiidae) and all Onuxodon (Carapidae) species have in common, at the front of the swimbladder, a mineralized structure called rocker bone. According to morphological observations, it probably results from adaptive convergence. Its evolutionary advantage remains however to be determined. Sonic apparatus morphology and sound characteristics were examined in Ophidion rochei from Dùlce-Glàva (Croatia) and in Onuxodon fowleri from Makemo (French Polynesia). The rocker bone is only present in males in O. rochei but in both sexes in O. fowleri. Onuxodon fowleri and male O. rochei produce calls that often last more than 1 s. Calls are composed of 1 to 41 pulses lasting for 21±10 ms in O. fowleri and 1 to 55 pulses lasting for 16±13 ms in O. rochei. Mean pulse periods are also relatively long, ca. 95 ms and 125 ms, respectively. Females of O. rochei produce short (ca. 20 ms) hum-like sounds that are characterized by shorter pulses (mean duration: 0.7±0.2 ms) and higher pulse rates (mean pulse period: 4±1 ms). Differences in sound characteristics are likely due to the rocker bone that most probably evolved in response to mechanical constraints acting on the swimbladder in O. fowleri and male O. rochei. Its presence suggests a sustained sound production was crucial in their evolutionary success. However, the sexual dimorphism observed in O. rochei but not in O. fowleri suggests differences in way of life. [less ▲]

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See detailFish larvae prefer coral over algal water cues: implications of coral reef degradation
Lecchini, David; Waqalevu, Viliam; Parmentier, Eric ULg et al

in Marine Ecology. Progress Series (2013), 475

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See detailEffects of alternate reef states on coral reef fish habitat associations
Lecchini, David; Carassou, Laure; Frederich, Bruno ULg et al

in Environmental Biology of Fishes (2012), 94(2), 421-429

The present study describes ontogenetic shifts in habitat use for 15 species of coral reef fish at Rangiroa Atoll, French Polynesia. The distribution of fish in different habitats at three ontogenetic ... [more ▼]

The present study describes ontogenetic shifts in habitat use for 15 species of coral reef fish at Rangiroa Atoll, French Polynesia. The distribution of fish in different habitats at three ontogenetic stages (new settler, juvenile, and adult) was investigated in coral- dominated and algal-dominated sites at two reefs (fringing reef and inner reef of motu). Three main ontogenetic patterns in habitat use were identified: (1) species that did not change habitats between new settler and juvenile life stages (60% of species) or between juvenile and adult stages (55% of species—no ontoge- netic shift); (2) species that changed habitats at different ontogenetic stages (for the transition “new settler to juvenile stage”: 15% of species; for the transition “juvenile to adult stage”: 20% of species); and (3) species that increased the number of habitats they used over ontogeny (for the transition “new settler to juvenile stage”: 25% of species; for the transition “juvenile to adult stage”: 25% of species). Moreover, the majority of studied species (53%) showed a spatial variability in their ontogenetic pattern of habitat use according to alternate reef states (coral reef vs algal reef), suggesting that reef state can influence the dynamics of habitat associations in coral reef fish. [less ▲]

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See detailMismatch between shape changes and ecological shifts during the post-settlement growth of the surgeonfish, Acanthurus triostegus
Frederich, Bruno ULg; Colleye, Orphal ULg; Lepoint, Gilles ULg et al

in Frontiers in Zoology (2012), 9

Background: Many coral reef fishes undergo habitat and diet shifts during ontogeny. However, studies focusing on the physiological and morphological adaptations that may prepare them for these transitions ... [more ▼]

Background: Many coral reef fishes undergo habitat and diet shifts during ontogeny. However, studies focusing on the physiological and morphological adaptations that may prepare them for these transitions are relatively scarce. Here, we explored the body shape variation related to ontogenetic shifts in the ecology of the surgeonfish Acanthurus triostegus (Acanthuridae) from new settler to adult stages at Moorea Island (French Polynesia). Specifically, we tested the relationship between diet and habitat shifts and changes in overall body shape during the ontogeny of A. triostegus using a combination of geometric morphometric methods, stomach contents and stable isotope analysis. Results: After reef settlement, stable isotope composition of carbon and nitrogen revealed a change from a zooplanktivorous to a benthic algae diet. The large amount of algae (> 75% of stomach contents) found in the digestive tract of small juveniles (25–30 mm SL) suggested the diet shift is rapid. The post-settlement growth of A. triostegus is highly allometric. The allometric shape changes mainly concern cephalic and pectoral regions. The head becomes shorter and more ventrally oriented during growth. Morphological changes are directly related to the diet shift given that a small mouth ventrally oriented is particularly suited for grazing activities at the adult stage. The pectoral fin is more anteriorely and vertically positioned and its basis is larger in adults than in juveniles. This shape variation had implications for swimming performance, manoeuvrability, turning ability and is related to habitat shift. Acanthurus triostegus achieves its main transformation of body shape to an adult-like form at size of 35–40 mm SL. Conclusion: Most of the shape changes occurred after the reef colonization but before the transition between juvenile habitat (fringing reef) and adult habitat (barrier reef). A large amount of allometric variation was observed after diet shift from zooplankton to benthic algae. Diet shift could act as an environmental factor favouring or inducing morphological changes. On the other hand, the main shape changes have to be achieved before the recruitment to adult populations and start negotiating the biophysical challenges of locomotion and feeding in wave- and current-swept outer reef habitat. [less ▲]

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See detailInterspecific variation of calls in clownfishes: degree of similarity in closely related species
Colleye, Orphal ULg; Vandewalle, Pierre ULg; Lanterbecq, Déborah et al

in BMC Evolutionary Biology (2011), 11

Clownfishes are colorful coral reef fishes living in groups in association with sea anemones throughout the Indo-Pacific Ocean. Within their small societies, size hierarchy determines which fish have ... [more ▼]

Clownfishes are colorful coral reef fishes living in groups in association with sea anemones throughout the Indo-Pacific Ocean. Within their small societies, size hierarchy determines which fish have access to reproduction. These fishes are also prolific callers whose aggressive sounds seem to play an important role in the social hierarchy. Agonistic interactions being involved in daily behaviour suggest how acoustic communication might play an important role in clownfish group. Sounds were recorded and compared in fourteen clownfish species (some of which have never been recorded before) to evaluate the potential role of acoustic communication as an evolutionary driving force. Surprisingly, the relationship between fish size and both dominant frequency and pulse duration is not only species-specific; all the specimens of the 14 species are situated on exactly the same slope, which means the size of any Amphiprion can be predicted by both acoustic features. The number of pulses broadly overlaps among species, whereas the pulse period displays the most variation even if it shows overlap among sympatric species. Sound comparisons between three species (A. akallopisos, A. ocellaris and A. frenatus) having different types of teeth and body shape do not show differences neither in the acoustic waveform nor in the power spectrum. Significant overlap in acoustic features demonstrates that the sound-producing mechanism is highly conservative among species. Differences in the calls of some species are due to size dimorphism and the sound variation might be in this case a by-product. This morphological constraint does not permit a consideration of acoustic communication as the main driving force in the diversification of clownfishes. Moreover, calls are not produced to find mate and consequently are less subject to variations due to partner preference, which restricts the constraints of diversification. Calls are produced to reach and defend the competition to mate access. However, differences in the pulse period between cohabiting species show that, in some case, sounds can help to differentiate the species, to prevent competition between cohabiting species and to promote the diversification of taxa. [less ▲]

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See detailComparative study on sound production in different Holocentridae species
Parmentier, Eric ULg; Vandewalle, Pierre ULg; Brié, Christophe et al

in Frontiers in Zoology (2011), 8

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See detailSound production and mechanism in Heniochus chrysostomus (Chaetodontidae)
Parmentier, Eric ULg; Boyle, Kelly; Berten, Laetitia ULg et al

in Journal of Experimental Biology (2011), 214

The diversity in calls and sonic mechanisms appears to be important in Chaetodontidae. Calls in Chaetodon multicinctus seem to include tail slap, jump, pelvic fin flick and dorsal–anal fin erection ... [more ▼]

The diversity in calls and sonic mechanisms appears to be important in Chaetodontidae. Calls in Chaetodon multicinctus seem to include tail slap, jump, pelvic fin flick and dorsal–anal fin erection behaviors. Pulsatile sounds are associated with dorsal elevation of the head, anterior extension of the ventral pectoral girdle and dorsal elevation of the caudal skeleton in Forcipiger flavissiumus. In Hemitaurichthys polylepis, extrinsic swimbladder muscles could be involved in sounds originating from the swimbladder and correspond to the inward buckling of tissues situated dorsally in front of the swimbladder. These examples suggest that this mode of communication could be present in other members of the family. Sounds made by the pennant bannerfish (Heniochus chrysostomus) were recorded for the first time on coral reefs and when fish were hand held. In hand-held fishes, three types of calls were recorded: isolated pulses (51%), trains of four to 11 pulses (19%) and trains preceded by an isolated pulse (29%). Call frequencies were harmonic and had a fundamental frequency between 130 and 180Hz. The fundamental frequency, sound amplitude and sound duration were not related to fish size. Data from morphology, sound analysis and electromyography recordings highlight that the calls are made by extrinsic sonic drumming muscles in association with the articulated bones of the ribcage. The pennant bannerfish system differs from other Chaetodontidae in terms of sound characteristics, associated body movements and, consequently, mechanism. [less ▲]

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