References of "Lecchini, David"
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See detailFurther insight into the iterative ecological radiation of damselfishes (Pomacentridae)
Gajdzik, Laura ULiege; Lepoint, Gilles ULiege; Michel, Loic et al

Conference (2017, October 05)

The evolutionary history of Pomacentridae (damselfishes) is a rare example of the occurrence of an iterative ecological radiation in the ocean. Damselfishes have experienced many repeated convergences ... [more ▼]

The evolutionary history of Pomacentridae (damselfishes) is a rare example of the occurrence of an iterative ecological radiation in the ocean. Damselfishes have experienced many repeated convergences wherein subclades radiated across similar trophic strategies (i.e. pelagic foragers, benthic feeders, and an intermediate group) and similar morphologies. The presence of evolutionary convergences in damselfishes was recently highlighted by the combination of ecological and morphological data, and the use of phylogenetic comparative methods. Nevertheless, many other aspects of these replicated sets of lineages remain unexplored. For example, little is known about the functional diversity of assemblages including convergent lineages that emerged from iterative processes of ecological radiation, or which of the niche-related processes and phylogenetic conservatism are the major factors shaping these assemblages. Here, we conducted a quantitative comparison of these processes in damselfish assemblages that belong to three distinct Indo-Pacific coral reefs differing in taxonomic composition, morphology and degree of human disturbance. Using various metrics, we compared the functional diversity (based on a dataset of eight functional traits) and the isotopic diversity (a proxy of trophic diversity) among assemblages, grasping many aspects of the eco-functional diversity of Pomacentridae. We also tested whether these eco-functional traits displayed some evolutionary conservatism. Our results demonstrate that the eco-functional diversity of damselfishes follows similar patterns among Indo-Pacific coral reefs. The trophic space remains equivalent despite gradient in species richness, whereas the number of functional entities occupied by taxa dictates the size of the functional space. In each assemblage, eco-functional niches are highly differentiated and evenly distributed in spaces of similar size. The inconsistent phylogenetic structure of eco-functional traits suggests that the similarity in the diversity of damselfish assemblages is mainly driven by niche-based processes and not by phylogenetic relatedness. We suggest that a broader application of our approach will help to uncover the mechanisms of reef fish community assembly over space and time. [less ▲]

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See detailOntogenetic and phylogenetic simplification during white stripe evolution in anemonefish
Salis, Pauline; Roux, Natacha; Soulat, Olivier et al

Poster (2017, October 04)

Coral reef fishes provide classical examples of complex colour patterns exhibiting a huge diversity. Most of these species display spots, stripes, repeated lines, eyespots, grids, etc. This diversity in ... [more ▼]

Coral reef fishes provide classical examples of complex colour patterns exhibiting a huge diversity. Most of these species display spots, stripes, repeated lines, eyespots, grids, etc. This diversity in colour patterns might serve for species recognition, camouflage, mimicry and/or warning. To date, work have mainly been focused on the link between colour patterns, ecology and behavior, that is the ultimate role of these patterns. However, the underlying development and cellular mechanisms controlling these patterns and their evolution, that is their proximal mechanisms, are still largely unknown. To address this question, we are using a well-known coral-reef fish models, anemonefishes (Amphiprion and the monotypic Premnas). This tribe (Amphiprionini) within the Pomacentridae is composed of 30 species that display a relatively simple colour pattern made of 0-3 white stripes that are well visible on a yellow to red, brown or even black body background. This simple colour pattern offers a unique opportunity to better delineate the pattern and processes allowing the diversification of such diversity. Here, we focus on the vertical white stripes present in most species of Amphiprion. We first map their striped patterns on the anemonefish evolutionary tree and reconstruct the ancestral state. Our results provide evidences that the diversification in colour pattern in anemonefish results from successive losses of stripes during evolution. Then, by an ontogenetic study, we show that larvae stripes always appear from rostral to caudal. Interestingly, larvae of some species such as A. frenatus have surplus stripes (with a maximum of three stripes) which disappear caudo-rostrally during the juvenile phase to acquire their adult color pattern. The reduction of stripes number over ontogeny totally matches the sequences of stripe losses across evolution. This demonstrates that the diversification in colour pattern among anemonefish lineages results from changes in developmental processes. Finally, assuming that the number of stripes may be related to the species ecology, we further determined the links between the number of stripes and ecomorphological traits. Together, this innovative study allows to understand how developmental processes are shaping the diversification of color pattern of anemonefishes and how it may be related with ecomorphological traits evolution. [less ▲]

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See detailAcoustic space sharing in the hullabaloo of a coral reef in Mooreas Island, French Polynesia
Bertucci, Frédéric; Maratrat, Katy; Parmentier, Eric ULiege et al

Conference (2017, October)

The more vocal species in a community, the more complex the acoustic environment, and signals produced by marine organisms in order to communicate may interfere. Since acoustic space is a limited resource ... [more ▼]

The more vocal species in a community, the more complex the acoustic environment, and signals produced by marine organisms in order to communicate may interfere. Since acoustic space is a limited resource to be shared, selection may have favored a partitioning of the available acoustic windows both at the temporal and spectral levels. This has already been reported in insects, frogs, birds or mammals but rarely in fishes. Our study aimed to investigate sounds produced within an ichthyological community in the North Coast of Moorea Island (French Polynesia). By using passive acoustic monitoring technics, we identified a total of 38 different types of sounds, some dominating during day-time while others dominated during night-time. Over 24h, we also observed a succession of optimal sound production periods for each sound type which suggests a finer level of temporal partitioning of fish vocalizations. Finally, we further showed that acoustic features of co-occurring sound types significantly differed allowing partitioning at the spectral level too. These results demonstrate the existence of acoustic partitioning and interference avoidance in a coral reef fish community and highlight how acoustic communication might be optimized in such a biologically rich and dense environment as coral reefs. [less ▲]

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See detailBody shape convergence driven by small size optimum in marine angelfishes
Frederich, Bruno ULiege; Santini, Francesco; Konow, Nicolai et al

in Biology Letters (2017), 13

Convergent evolution of small body size occurs across many vertebrate clades and may reflect an evolutionary response to shared selective press- ures. However it remains unclear if other aspects of ... [more ▼]

Convergent evolution of small body size occurs across many vertebrate clades and may reflect an evolutionary response to shared selective press- ures. However it remains unclear if other aspects of phenotype undergo convergent evolution in miniaturized lineages. Here we present a comparative analysis of body size and shape evolution in marine angelfishes (Pomacanthidae), a reef fish family characterized by repeated transitions to small body size. We ask if lineages that evolve small sizes show convergent evolution in body shape. Our results reveal that angelfish lineages evolved three different stable size optima with one corresponding to the group of pygmy angelfishes (Centropyge). Then, we test if the observed shifts in body size are associated with changes to new adaptive peaks in shape. Our data suggest that independent evolution to small size optima have induced repeated convergence upon deeper body and steeper head profile in Centropyge. These traits may favour manoeuvrability and visual aware- ness in these cryptic species living among corals, illustrating that functional demands on small size may be related to habitat specialization and predator avoidance. The absence of shape convergence in large marine angelfishes also suggests that more severe requirements exist for small than for large size optima. [less ▲]

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See detailPatterns of body size and shape diversification in marine angelfishes (Pomacanthidae)
Frederich, Bruno ULiege; Santini, Francesco; Konow, Nicolai et al

Conference (2017, January 06)

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See detailHabitat selection by marine larvae in changing chemical environments
Lecchini, David; Dixson, Danielle L.; Lecellier, Gael et al

in Marine Pollution Bulletin (2017), 114

The replenishment and persistence of marine species is contingent on dispersing larvae locating suitable habitat and surviving to a reproductive stage. Pelagic larvae rely on environmental cues to make ... [more ▼]

The replenishment and persistence of marine species is contingent on dispersing larvae locating suitable habitat and surviving to a reproductive stage. Pelagic larvae rely on environmental cues to make behavioural decisions with chemical information being important for habitat selection at settlement. We explored the sensory world of crustaceans and fishes focusing on the impact anthropogenic alterations (ocean acidification, red soil, pesticide) have on conspecific chemical signals used by larvae for habitat selection. Crustacean (Stenopus hispidus) and fish (Chromis viridis) larvae recognized their conspecifics via chemical signals under control conditions. In the presence of acidified water, red soil or pesticide, the ability of larvae to chemically recognize conspecific cues was altered. Our study highlights that recruitment potential on coral reefs may decrease due to anthropogenic stressors. If so, populations of fishes and crustaceans will continue their rapid decline; larval recruitment will not replace and sustain the adult populations on degraded reefs. [less ▲]

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See detailAcoustic indices provide information on the status of coral reefs: an example from Moorea Island in the South Pacific
Bertucci, Frédéric; Parmentier, Eric ULiege; Lecellier, Gaël et al

in Scientific Reports (2016), 6(33326), 1-9

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See detailSound Production in Damselfishes
Parmentier, Eric ULiege; Lecchini, David; Mann, David

in Frederich, Bruno; Parmentier, Eric (Eds.) Meet the Damselfishes (2016)

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See detailAuditory evoked potential audiograms in post-settlement stage individuals of coral reef fishes
Colleye, Orphal ULiege; Kever, Loïc ULiege; Lecchini, David et al

in Journal of Experimental Marine Biology & Ecology (2016), 483

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See detailBrain lateralization involved in visual recognition of conspecifics in coral reef fish at recruitment
Roux, Natacha; Duran, Emilio; Lanyon, Rynae G. et al

in Animal Behaviour (2016), 117

In vertebrates, brain functional asymmetries are widespread and increase brain performance. Some species of fishes are known to have brain asymmetries; however, little information is available on brain ... [more ▼]

In vertebrates, brain functional asymmetries are widespread and increase brain performance. Some species of fishes are known to have brain asymmetries; however, little information is available on brain lateralization in coral reef fishes and the impact this could have during the recruitment phase. In this study, soldierfish, Myripristis pralinia, at the larval and juvenile stage recognized conspecifics through visual cues. Larvae with the ablation of either the right or left telencephalic hemisphere lost the attraction towards conspecific cues. In contrast, juveniles with the ablation of the right (but not left) telencephalic hemisphere still displayed a preference towards conspecific visual cues. These results suggest the left telencephalic hemisphere is responsible for the lateralization process used in the visual recognition of coral reef fish juveniles. The determinism of lateralized perception of conspecifics during fish ontogeny may be a consequence of genetic factors, linked with the metamorphosis processes and/or environmental factors such as predation at recruitment. [less ▲]

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See detailNew insights into sound production in Carapus mourlani (Carapidae)
Parmentier, Eric ULiege; Colleye, Orphal ULiege; Lecchini, David

in Bulletin of Marine Science (2016), 92(3),

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See detailEffect of evolutionary miniaturization on the tempo and mode of diversification - An example from marine angelfishes
Frederich, Bruno ULiege; Santini, Francesco; Konow, Nicolai et al

Conference (2015, October 09)

Evolutionary change in body size is a widespread phenomenon in animals. Numerous studies have highlighted evolutionary miniaturization, referring to the evolution of small body size, in various taxa. As ... [more ▼]

Evolutionary change in body size is a widespread phenomenon in animals. Numerous studies have highlighted evolutionary miniaturization, referring to the evolution of small body size, in various taxa. As other traits shift, decrease in size can be viewed as a morphological novelty that enables colonization of new “adaptive zones” and subsequent diversification (i.e. a “key innovation”). Thus, evolution to small body size is hypothesized to influence lineage, morphological and ecological diversification. Until now, few studies have tested this hypothesis and current supports are mixed. Here, we present a quantitative analysis of the radiation of Pomacanthidae (angelfishes), an iconic coral reef fish family where small taxa, the so called “pygmy angelfishes” of the genus Centropyge, appear to have evolved three-times. If an evolutionary decrease in size has acted as a key innovation during the evolutionary history of Pomacanthidae, we predict that diversification rates would be the highest in clades of pygmy angelfishes. We produced a time-calibrated phylogeny including 67 species, collected ecological data and quantified the body shape of 80 species using geometric morphometrics. Then, we tested the prediction by modelling macroevolutionary dynamics of diversification using the Bayesian Analysis of Macroevolutionary Mixture (BAMM) framework. BAMM results do not support a common macroevolutionary regime for every pigmy angelfish clades. Only the clade Centropyge Xiphypops shows higher rates of lineage and morphological diversification than the other clades of angelfishes. We show that miniaturization has few effects on the rate of diversification. The shifts in the tempo of diversification observed in C. Xiphypops might instead be related to a functional innovation of the feeding apparatus. Using the Pomacanthidae, we illustrate that miniaturization may not be a main factor in triggering increased of diversification rates at the family level. [less ▲]

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See detailTemporal and spatial comparisons of underwater sound signatures of different reef habitats in Moorea Island, French Polynesia
Bertucci, Frédéric; Parmentier, Eric ULiege; Berten, Laetitia et al

in PLoS ONE (2015)

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See detailComparison of isotopic turnover dynamics in two different muscles of a coral reef fish during the settlement phase
Gajdzik, Laura ULiege; Lepoint, Gilles ULiege; Lecchini, David et al

in Scientia Marina (2015), 79(3), 325-333

The temporal variation in carbon and nitrogen isotopic compositions (noted as δ13C and δ15N) was investigated in the convict surgeonfish (Acanthurus triostegus) at Moorea (French Polynesia). Over a period ... [more ▼]

The temporal variation in carbon and nitrogen isotopic compositions (noted as δ13C and δ15N) was investigated in the convict surgeonfish (Acanthurus triostegus) at Moorea (French Polynesia). Over a period of 24 days, juveniles were reared in aquaria and subjected to two different feeding treatments: granules or algae. The dynamics of δ13C and δ15N in two muscles (the adductor mandibulae complex and the epaxial musculature) having different functions were compared. At the end of experiments, a steady-state isotopic system in each muscle tissue was not reached. Especially for the algal treatment, we found different patterns of variation in isotopic compositions over time between the two muscles. The turnovers of δ13C showed opposite trends for each muscle but differences are mitigated by starvation and by the metamorphosis. Our study highlighted that the metabolism of coral reef fish may be subjected to catabolism or anabolism of non-protein precursors at settlement, inducing variation in isotopic compositions that are not linked to diet change. [less ▲]

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See detailChemical spying in coral reef fish larvae at recruitment
Roux, Natacha; Brooker, Rohan M.; Lecellier, Gaël et al

in Comptes Rendus Biologies (2015), 338

When fish larvae recruit back to a reef, chemical cues are often used to find suitable habitat or to find juvenile or adult conspecifics. We tested if the chemical information used by larvae was ... [more ▼]

When fish larvae recruit back to a reef, chemical cues are often used to find suitable habitat or to find juvenile or adult conspecifics. We tested if the chemical information used by larvae was intentionally produced by juvenile and adult conspecifics already on the reef (communication process) or whether the cues used result from normal biochemical processes with no active involvement by conspecifics (‘‘spying’’ behavior by larvae). Conspecific chemical cues attracted the majority of larvae (four out of the seven species tested); although while some species were equally attracted to cues from adults and juveniles (Chromis viridis, Apogon novemfasciatus), two exhibited greater sensitivity to adult cues (Pomacentrus pavo, Dascyllus aruanus). Our results indicate also that spying cues are those most commonly used by settling fishes (C. viridis, P. pavo, A. novemfasciatus). Only one species (D. aruanus) preferred the odour of conspecifics that had had visual contact with larvae (communication). [less ▲]

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See detailFrom the ocean to a reef habitat: How do the larvae of coral reef fishes find their way home? A state of art on the latest advances
Barth, P; Berenshtein, I; Besson, M et al

in Vie et Milieu (2015), 65(2), 91-100

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See detailLarge scale acoustic survey as a new tool for the evaluation of coral reef biodiversity (Moorea, French Polynesia)
Bertucci, Frédéric; Lecchini, David; Parmentier, Eric ULiege

Conference (2015)

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See detailThe influence of various reef sounds on coral-fish larvae behaviour
Parmentier, Eric ULiege; Berten, Laetitia; Rigo, Pierre ULiege et al

in Journal of Fish Biology (2015)

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See detailSound production in Onuxodon fowleri (Carapidae) and its amplification by the host shell
Kever, Loïc ULiege; Colleye, Orphal ULiege; Lugli, Marco et al

in Journal of Experimental Biology (2014), 217

Onuxodon species are well known for living inside pearl oysters. As in other carapids, their anatomy highlights their ability to make sounds but sound production has never been documented in Onuxodon ... [more ▼]

Onuxodon species are well known for living inside pearl oysters. As in other carapids, their anatomy highlights their ability to make sounds but sound production has never been documented in Onuxodon. This paper describes sound production in Onuxodon fowleri as well as the anatomy of the sound production apparatus. Single-pulsed sounds and multiple-pulsed sounds that sometimes last more than 3 s were recorded in the field and in captivity (Makemo Island, French Polynesia). These pulses are characterized by a broadband frequency spectrum from 100 to 1000 Hz. Onuxodon fowleri is mainly characterized by its ability to modulate the pulse period, meaning that this species can produce pulsed sounds and tonal-like sounds using the same mechanism. In addition, the sound can be remarkably amplified by the shell cavity (peak gain can exceed 10 dB for some frequencies). The sonic apparatus of O. fowleri is characterized by a rocker bone in front of the swimbladder, modified vertebrae and epineurals, and two pairs of sonic muscles, one of which (primary sonic muscle) inserts on the rocker bone. The latter structure, which is absent in other carapid genera, appears to be sexually dimorphic suggesting differences in sound production in males and females. Sound production in O. fowleri could be an example of adaptation where an animal exploits features of its environment to enhance communication. [less ▲]

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