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See detailHuman impacts on Antarctic ecosystems: do not forget the microorganisms!
Hughes, Kevin; Verleyen, Elie; Vyverman, Wim et al

Conference (2013, July)

The tiny and microscopic creatures that are the permanent inhabitants of the Antarctic continent are often overlooked in environmental impact assessments and when new management and protection strategies ... [more ▼]

The tiny and microscopic creatures that are the permanent inhabitants of the Antarctic continent are often overlooked in environmental impact assessments and when new management and protection strategies are designed. This lack of consideration is probably due to their small size and the need of sophisticated molecular methods to study their diversity, evolution and geographic distribution. However, considerable progress has been made in the field of molecular diversity in the last two decennia, and is still ongoing for Antarctic bacteria, cyanobacteria, protists, fungi, etc. Recent studies have shown the presence of highly diverse microbial communities and the existence of species endemic to Antarctic in some taxonomic groups. With the emergence of High Throughput Sequencing methodologies that are able to detect ‘rare’ taxa, it becomes crucial to find Antarctic locations that have not yet been impacted by human presence. These ‘pristine’ areas are essential to serve as reference sites and allow to distinguish the true Antarctic organisms from the imported ones. Indeed, recent studies have shown that humans unintentionally disperse their own microbial flora but may also spread organisms from other locations. In the extreme biotopes with a reduced diversity that are currently found in Antarctica, such contaminations might have a profound impact. It is important to raise the awareness of scientists, environmental managers and policy makers about the necessity to single out some areas that are kept untouched, or where stringent biosecurity measures are taken. The purpose is not to hinder scientific research, but to weigh carefully, when exploring a new area, the importance of the acquired piece of knowledge in relation to the possibility of hindering future microbiological research. Some parallels with other fields of research are interesting to consider. Archeologists are used to keeping some parts of the explored caves untouched because they foresee that technological progress will allow better analyses in future. The COSPAR Panel on Planetary Protection makes recommendations to avoid the contamination of other planets with microbes from Earth, which would obscure any discovery of extraterrestrial indigenous life forms. These examples illustrate the essential need to integrate the delineation of reference areas for future analyses in the design and execution of scientific research. In fact, the Madrid Protocol foresees the possibility to designate ‘inviolate areas’ (Annex V, Article 3), though this tool has rarely been used. It would be useful if scientists of all disciplines would reflect how to use this management option. [less ▲]

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See detailNovel Bacterial Isolate from Permian Groundwater, Capable of Aggregating Potential Biofuel-Producing Microalga Nannochloropsis oceanica IMET1
Wang, H; Laughinghouse IV, Haywood ULg; Anderson, MA et al

in Applied and Environmental Microbiology (2012), 78(5), 1445-1453

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See detailPollen grain viability in accessions of Crotalaria juncea L. (Fabaceae)
Coelho, APD; Morais, K; Laughinghouse IV, Haywood ULg et al

in Agrociencia (2012), 46

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See detailPollen viability of Polygala paniculata L. (Polygalaceae) using different methods of staining
Frescura, VDS; Laughinghouse IV, Haywood ULg; Canto-Dorow, TS et al

in Biocell (2012), 36(3), 143-145

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See detailAntiproliferative effect of the arboreal and medicinal species Luehea divaricata on the Allium cepa cell cycle
Frescura, VDS; Laughinghouse IV, Haywood ULg; Tedesco, SB

in Caryologia : Giornale di Citologia, Citosistematica, e Citogenetica (2012), 65(1), 27-33

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See detailBioindicator of Genotoxicity: the Allium cepa test
Tedesco, S; Laughinghouse IV, Haywood ULg

in Srivastava, J.K. (Ed.) Environmental Contamination (2012)

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See detailA new red colonial Pseudanabaena (Cyanoprokaryota, Oscillatoriales) from North American large lakes
Kling, H; Laughinghouse IV, Haywood ULg; Smarda, J et al

in Fottea (Praha) (2012), 12(2), 327-339

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See detailBiomonitoring genotoxicity and cytotoxicity of Microcystis aeruginosa (Chroococcales, Cyanobacteria) using the Allium cepa test
Laughinghouse IV, Haywood ULg; Pra, D; Silva-Stenico, ME et al

in Science of the Total Environment (2012), 432

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See detailPollen viability of genotypes of Eragrostis plana from different geographic populations in Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil
Piccini, F; Frescura, VDS; Laughinghouse IV, Haywood ULg et al

in Enciclopédia Biosfera (2012), 8(15), 1316-1324

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See detailCharacterization of a novel freshwater gigartinalean red alga from Belize, with description of Sterrocladia belizeana sp. nov
Sherwood, AR; Necchi Jr, O; Carlile, AL et al

in Phycologia (2012), 51(6), 627-635

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See detailSeasonal productivity of a periphytic algal community for biofuel feedstock generation and nutrient treatment
Sandefur, HN; Matlock, MD; Costello, TA et al

in Ecological Engineering (2011), 37

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See detailABA-mediated proline synthesis in cowpea leaves exposed to water deficiency and rehydration
Costa, RCL; Lobato, AKS; Silveira, JAG et al

in Turkish Journal of Agriculture & Forestry (2011), 35

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See detailSeed and Seedling Anatomy in Euterpe oleraceae Mart. during the Germination Process
Neto, MAM; Lobato, AKS; Alves, JD et al

in Journal of Food, Agriculture and Environment [=JFAE] (2010), 8(2), 1147-1152

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See detailAntiproliferative and genotoxic effects of Mikania glomerata (Asteraceae)
Dalla Nora, G; Pastori, T; Laughinghouse IV, Haywood ULg et al

in Biocell : Official Journal of the Sociedades Latinoamericanas de Microscopia Electronica ... Et. Al (2010), 34(3), 95-101

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See detailAlterations in the mitotic index of Allium cepa induced by infusions of Pluchea sagittalis submitted to three different cultivation systems
Rossato, LV; Tedesco, SB; Laughinghouse IV, Haywood ULg et al

in Anais da Academia Brasileira de Ciencias (2010), 82(4), 857-860

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See detailGenotoxic potential of aqueous extracts of Artemisia verlotorum on the cell cycle of Allium cepa
Souza, LFB; Laughinghouse IV, Haywood ULg; Pastori, T et al

in International Journal of Environmental Studies (2010), 67(6), 871-877

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See detailBiomonitoring Hospital Effluents by the Allium cepa L. Test
Bagatini, MD; Vasconcelos, TG; Laughinghouse IV, Haywood ULg et al

in Bulletin of Environmental Contamination & Toxicology (2009), 82

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See detailEvaluation of the antiproliferative effects of infusions and essential oil of Aloysia gratissima
Hister, CAL; Laughinghouse IV, Haywood ULg; Silva, CB et al

in Pakistan Journal of Biological Sciences (2009), 12(24), 1581-1584

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