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See detailDiet analysis of Leopoldamys neilli, a cave-dwelling rodent in Southeast Asia, using Next-Generation Sequencing from feces
Latinne, Alice ULg; Galan, Maxime; Waengsothorn, Surachit et al

in Journal of Cave and Karst Studies (2014), 76(2), 139-145

Leopoldamys neilli is a Murinae rodent endemic to limestone karst of Thailand and the Lao PDR, but its ecology and the reasons of its endemism to karst are still totally unknown. The aim of this pilot ... [more ▼]

Leopoldamys neilli is a Murinae rodent endemic to limestone karst of Thailand and the Lao PDR, but its ecology and the reasons of its endemism to karst are still totally unknown. The aim of this pilot study was to examine the plant composition of the diet of L. neilli at the level of order and family using DNA for molecular identification and to compare it with two other forest-dwelling Leopoldamys species, L. herberti and L. sabanus. A 202bp fragment of the rbcL gene was amplified and sequenced for twenty-three fecal samples of the three species using 454 pyrosequencing. We successfully identified a total of seventeen orders and twenty-one plant families, corresponding to thirty-three putative species, in the feces of these three Leopoldamys species. Solanaceae were the most common plants in the diet of L.neilli regardless of the region and sampling season, and they were also present in feces of both L. herberti and L. sabanus. The Araceae, Fabaceae, and Apocynaceae families were also identified in feces of L. neilli collected in various regions of Thailand and at different seasons. Plants of the Oleaceae family are consumed by both L. herberti and L. sabanus but were not found in the diet of L. neilli. Further improvements of the study, such as the use of additional genes, the creation of a reference collection, the microhistological examination of plant fragments to determine which parts of the plant are consumed, and the analysis of the animal diet of Leopoldamys are suggested to enhance the quality and accuracy of the results obtained. [less ▲]

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See detailIs Leopoldamys neilli (Rodentia, Muridae) a synonym of Leopoldamys herberti? A reply to Balakirev et al. (2013)
Latinne, Alice ULg; Chaval, Yannick; Waengsothorn, Surachit et al

in Zootaxa (2013), 3731(4), 589-598

Recently, Balakirev et al. (2013) presented a taxonomic revision of the genus Leopoldamys based on phylogenetic analyses. They identified five main Leopoldamys genetic lineages and suggested to rename ... [more ▼]

Recently, Balakirev et al. (2013) presented a taxonomic revision of the genus Leopoldamys based on phylogenetic analyses. They identified five main Leopoldamys genetic lineages and suggested to rename several of them. According to these authors, the genetic lineage previously thought to belong to L. edwardsi (lineage L1) should be assigned to L. revertens while L. neilli (lineage L2) should be considered as a junior synonym of L. herberti. Using molecular and morphological data from a large sampling of Leopoldamys specimens, the aim of the present study was to investigate the taxonomic status of L. herberti and L. neilli. This study reveals that, contrary to Balakirev et al.’s statement, both genetic lineages L1 and L2 occur in Nakhon Ratchasima Province, close to the type locality of L. herberti. We also show that the external measurements and color pattern of L. herberti are highly similar to those of L1 specimens but are not consistent with the morphology of L2 specimens. Therefore these results strongly suggest that L. herberti should be assigned to the genetic lineage L1. Consequently L. neilli should not be considered as a junior synonym of L. herberti and this study confirms that the appropriate name of the genetic lineage L2 is L. neilli. Moreover, as our results show that L. herberti should be assigned to the lineage L1, this name has nomenclatural priority over L. revertens, the species name suggested by Balakirev et al. (2013) for this lineage. [less ▲]

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See detailDiversity and endemism of Murinae rodents in Thai limestone karsts
Latinne, Alice ULg; Waengsothorn, Surachit; Rojanadilok, Prateep et al

in Systematics and Biodiversity (2013), 11(3), 323-344

This study aims to investigate the species diversity of rodents living in karst ecosystems of Thailand. A survey has been conducted throughout Thailand, 122 karsts sampled and 477 Murinae rodents live ... [more ▼]

This study aims to investigate the species diversity of rodents living in karst ecosystems of Thailand. A survey has been conducted throughout Thailand, 122 karsts sampled and 477 Murinae rodents live-trapped. Phylogenetic reconstructions were carried out using two mitochondrial markers (cytb, COI). A sequence-based species delimitation method completed by the analysis of the level of genetic divergence was then applied to define species boundaries within our dataset. The phylogenetic position of Niviventer hinpoon was also investigated and sequences obtained from the holotype specimen of this species were used to reliably identify samples of N. hinpoon. A total of 12 described Murinae species, corresponding to 17 deeply divergent genetic lineages, were encountered in limestone karsts of Thailand. Our study revealed an important genetic diversity within the traditionally recognized species Maxomys surifer (four highly divergent genetic lineages), Leopoldamys neilli (two highly divergent genetic lineages) and Berylmys bowersi (two highly divergent genetic lineages). These species could be considered as species complex and require further taxonomic work. This study also provides valuable information on the distribution of the two rodent species endemic to limestone karsts of Thailand, L. neilli and N. hinpoon. Leopoldamys neilli was the most abundant species encountered in Thai karsts during our survey. However, L. neilli specimens from western Thailand are genetically highly divergent from the remaining populations of L. neilli and could represent a separate species. Niviventer hinpoon, phylogenetically closely related to N. fulvescens, is much rarer and its distribution limited to central Thailand. Most of the other captured species are typically associated with forest ecosystems. This study suggests that limestone karsts play a key role in the preservation of the rodent species endemic to such habitat, but they would also provide refuges for the forest-dwelling Murinae rodents in deforested regions. [less ▲]

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See detailEvolutionary history of Leopoldamys neilli, a karst endemic rodent in Southeast Asia, and implications for its conservation
Latinne, Alice ULg; Waengsothorn, Surachit; Michaux, Johan ULg

Conference (2013, August 15)

In this study, we have investigated the phylogeography of Leopoldamys neilli, a Murinae rodent species endemic to limestone karsts in Southeast Asia, on the basis of mitochondrial and nuclear markers ... [more ▼]

In this study, we have investigated the phylogeography of Leopoldamys neilli, a Murinae rodent species endemic to limestone karsts in Southeast Asia, on the basis of mitochondrial and nuclear markers. Both mitochondrial and nuclear markers support a large-scale population structure of four main groups within L. neilli and a strong finer structure within each of these groups. A deep genealogical divergence among geographically close lineages is observed and denotes a high population fragmentation. Our findings suggest that the current phylogeographic pattern of this species results from the fragmentation of a widespread ancestral population and that vicariance has played a significant role in the evolutionary history of L. neilli during Plio-Pleistocene. This study revealed an unexpected high level of intraspecific diversity within L. neilli. Consequently, the four main L. neilli population groups should be considered as four distinct Evolutionarily Significant Units (ESUs) and require appropriate management and conservation plans. [less ▲]

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See detailCyrtodactylus sanook (Squamata: Gekkonidae), a new cave-dwelling gecko from Chumphon Province, southern Thailand
Pauwels, Olivier S.G.; Sumontha, Montri; Latinne, Alice ULg et al

in Zootaxa (2013), 3635(3), 275-285

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See detailCombined Mitochondrial and Nuclear Markers Revealed a Deep Vicariant History for Leopoldamys neilli, a Cave-Dwelling Rodent of Thailand
Latinne, Alice ULg; Waengsothorn, Surachit; Rojanadilok, Prateep et al

in PLoS ONE (2012), 7(10), 47670

Background: Historical biogeography and evolutionary processes of cave taxa have been widely studied in temperate regions. However, Southeast Asian cave ecosystems remain largely unexplored despite their ... [more ▼]

Background: Historical biogeography and evolutionary processes of cave taxa have been widely studied in temperate regions. However, Southeast Asian cave ecosystems remain largely unexplored despite their high scientific interest. Here we studied the phylogeography of Leopoldamys neilli, a cave-dwelling murine rodent living in limestone karsts of Thailand, and compared the molecular signature of mitochondrial and nuclear markers. Methodology/Principal Findings: We used a large sampling (n = 225) from 28 localities in Thailand and a combination of mitochondrial and nuclear markers with various evolutionary rates (two intronic regions and 12 microsatellites). The evolutionary history of L. neilli and the relative role of vicariance and dispersal were investigated using ancestral range reconstruction analysis and Approximate Bayesian computation (ABC). Both mitochondrial and nuclear markers support a large-scale population structure of four main groups (west, centre, north and northeast) and a strong finer structure within each of these groups. A deep genealogical divergence among geographically close lineages is observed and denotes a high population fragmentation. Our findings suggest that the current phylogeographic pattern of this species results from the fragmentation of a widespread ancestral population and that vicariance has played a significant role in the evolutionary history of L. neilli. These deep vicariant events that occurred during Plio-Pleistocene are related to the formation of the Central Plain of Thailand. Consequently, the western, central, northern and northeastern groups of populations were historically isolated and should be considered as four distinct Evolutionarily Significant Units (ESUs). Conclusions/Significance: Our study confirms the benefit of using several independent genetic markers to obtain a comprehensive and reliable picture of L. neilli evolutionary history at different levels of resolution. The complex genetic structure of Leopoldamys neilli is supported by congruent mitochondrial and nuclear markers and has been influenced by the geological history of Thailand during Plio-Pleistocene. [less ▲]

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See detailPhylogeography and evolutionary history of Leopoldamys neilli, a Murinae rodent endemic to limestone karsts, in Thailand
Latinne, Alice ULg; Waengsothorn, Surachit; Herbreteau, Vincent et al

Conference (2012, May 15)

Limestone karsts are highly threatened biodiversity hotspots supporting high levels of endemic species. Karsts are patchy distributed within Southeast Asia and their isolation from one another give them ... [more ▼]

Limestone karsts are highly threatened biodiversity hotspots supporting high levels of endemic species. Karsts are patchy distributed within Southeast Asia and their isolation from one another give them the features of “islands on the continent” and has important consequences for the genetic structure of endemic taxa. In present study, we have studied the phylogeography of Neill’s Rat Leopoldamys neilli, a threatened Murinae rodent species endemic to limestone karsts of Thailand, on the basis of two mitochondrial markers, two nuclear fragments, as well as twelve microsatellite loci. Our study gave evidence of a complex and strong geographic structure of the genetic diversity for L. neilli. Several highly differentiated genetic lineages were observed throughout Thailand. These results suggest a severe fragmentation of L. neilli’s populations, correlated to the fragmented distribution of its habitat and highlight its high endemicity to limestone karsts. The evolutionary history of L. neilli was investigated using Approximate Bayesian computation (ABC) and our results suggest that the current phylogeographic pattern of this species result from several deep vicariant events during Plio-Pleistocene. To conclude, this study revealed an unexpected high level of intraspecific diversity within L. neilli. These results consolidate the importance to strengthen the protection of limestone habitats and to preserve not only their high interspecific but also intraspecific diversity. [less ▲]

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See detailLe côté obscur des milieux souterrains du sud-est asiatique
Latinne, Alice ULg

in L'Echo des Rhinos (2012), 76

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See detailDiversity and endemism of Murinae rodents in Thai limestone karsts: a genetic approach
Latinne, Alice ULg

Doctoral thesis (2012)

Limestone karsts are characterized by an important species richness and high levels of endemic species of plants, vertebrates and invertebrates adapted to this extreme environment. However, in Southeast ... [more ▼]

Limestone karsts are characterized by an important species richness and high levels of endemic species of plants, vertebrates and invertebrates adapted to this extreme environment. However, in Southeast Asia, karst ecosystems suffer from a considerable lack of scientific data and remain widely unknown despite their high biological importance. Combining field investigations with phylogeographic and phylogenetic analyses based on several kinds of molecular markers, this thesis aims at exploring the diversity and endemism of Murinae rodents in limestone karsts of Thailand. Thai limestone karsts host two endemic Murinae rodent species, Leopoldamys neilli and Niviventer hinpoon. This thesis reveals that L. neilli is more largely distributed in Thailand than indicated by previous records available in the literature. The species has been recorded in numerous limestone karsts of Thailand with the exception of its peninsular area. L. neilli has also been discovered in central Laos. Moreover our niche modeling study indicates that large tracts of suitable habitat for this species may also occur in several regions of Indochina. L. neilli populations are highly fragmented and a deep genealogical divergence among its lineages is observed. Both mitochondrial and nuclear markers support a large-scale population structure of four main groups (west, centre, north and northeast) and a strong finer structure within each of these groups. These results indicate that L. neilli populations are isolated on karsts such as on islands and that migrations among them are reduced. Our findings also suggest that the current phylogeographic pattern of this species results from the fragmentation of a widespread ancestral population and that vicariance has played a significant role in the evolutionary history of L. neilli. These deep vicariant events that occurred during Plio-Pleistocene are related to the formation of the Central Plain of Thailand. Moreover, the western populations of L. neilli are genetically and morphologically highly divergent from the other populations and could represent a separate species. This strong phylogeographic pattern is not observed for other Murinae species with lower levels of ecological specialization such as Leopoldamys edwardsi and Rattus tanezumi. Finally, this thesis provides preliminary information about the diet of L. neilli and indicates that plants of the Solanaceae family constitute an important part of its diet. The phylogeographic structure of N. hinpoon is not similar to the one of L. neilli. In contrast to L. neilli, N. hinpoon is confined to central Thailand and mitochondrial markers used in this study indicated that this species is genetically homogenous and characterized by a single mitochondrial lineage. Valuable data to refine the conservation status of L. neilli and N. hinpoon, two species currently listed as Data Deficient on the IUCN Red List have been gathered during this study. Three main threats to the long-term subsistence of L. neilli have been identified: (1) the high fragmentation of its population, (2) the large-scale destruction of limestone karsts in Southeast Asia, and (3) the intense trapping of this species for human consumption in northeastern Thailand. Therefore we propose to consider L. neilli as “Near threatened” on the IUCN Red List. However, if the western lineage of L. neilli represents a separate species, it should be listed as “Vulnerable”. Due to its small distribution range and the high threats that its habitat is facing in central Thailand, N. hinpoon would also be qualified as “Vulnerable” on the IUCN Red List. In addition to karst endemic species, this thesis reveals that Thai limestone karsts host high levels of Murinae rodent diversity. A sequence-based species delimitation method completed by the analysis of the level of genetic divergence was used to define species boundaries within our rodent samples collected in limestone karsts. A total of 12 described Murinae species, corresponding to 17 putative species based on our genetic criteria, were encountered in limestone karsts of Thailand. Most of these species are associated to forest ecosystems. Therefore this study suggests that limestone karsts could play a key role in the preservation of the rodent biodiversity by providing refuges for the forest-dwelling Murinae rodents in deforested regions. An important cryptic diversity has been detected within the traditionally recognized species Maxomys surifer and Berylmys bowersi. They could be considered as species complex and require further taxonomic work. The potential distribution of Leopoldamys edwardsi and Leopoldamys sabanus, two species also distributed in Thailand, has been investigated using niche modeling techniques. The predicted distribution ranges of these two species suggest a clear geographical separation between them, with the potential distribution of L. edwardsi being limited to the northern part of Indochina while L. sabanus is mainly distributed in the Sundaic region. Our findings also suggest that these two species could have survived in large areas of Southeast Asia during Quaternary ice ages without large scale extinction and that no drastic modification of the distribution of these species will occur in the future due to climate changes. In conclusion, using various genetic approaches, this work gains important insights into the Murinae rodent diversity of Thai limestone karsts and represents the first detailed study of karst endemic rodent species in Southeast Asia. [less ▲]

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See detailEvidence of complex phylogeographic structure for the threatened rodent Leopoldamys neilli endemic to limestone karsts of Thailand
Latinne, Alice ULg; Waengsothorn, Surachit; Herbreteau, Vincent et al

Conference (2011, July 21)

Limestone karsts are highly threatened biodiversity hotspots supporting huge levels of endemic species. Karsts are patchy distributed within Southeast Asia and their isolation from one another give them ... [more ▼]

Limestone karsts are highly threatened biodiversity hotspots supporting huge levels of endemic species. Karsts are patchy distributed within Southeast Asia and their isolation from one another give them the features of “islands on the continent”. We have studied the phylogeography of Neill’s Rat Leopoldamys neilli, a threatened murine rodent species endemic to limestone karsts of Thailand, in order to assess the influence of its endemicity to karst habitat on its phylogeographic pattern. Two hundred twenty-two individuals of L. neilli were collected in 26 limestone karsts throughout the geographical range of this species and were used in this study. Phylogeographic structure and population genetics of L. neilli were investigated on the basis of two mitochondrial markers, the cytochrome b gene and the cytochrome c oxydase subunit I gene, two nuclear fragments, the β-fibrinogen intron 7 and the intron 1 of the X-linked gene G6pd, and 12 microsatellite loci. Our study gave evidence of a complex and strong geographic structure of the genetic diversity for L. neilli. Several highly differentiated genetic lineages were observed throughout Thailand. These results suggest a severe fragmentation of L. neilli’s populations, correlated to the fragmented distribution of its habitat and highlight its high endemicity to limestone karsts. In conclusion, this study revealed an unexpected high level of intraspecific diversity within L. neilli. These results consolidate the importance to strengthen the protection of limestone habitats and to preserve not only their huge interspecific but also intraspecific diversity. [less ▲]

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See detailIsolation, characterization and PCR multiplexing of polymorphic microsatellite markers in the threatened murine rodent, Leopoldamys neilli
Latinne, Alice ULg; Waengsothorn, Surachit; Risterucci, Ange Marie et al

in Conservation Genetics Resources (2011), 3

Leopoldamys neilli is a threatened murine rodent species endemic to limestone karsts of Thailand. Twelve microsatellite loci were identified using the method of microsatellite-enriched libraries ... [more ▼]

Leopoldamys neilli is a threatened murine rodent species endemic to limestone karsts of Thailand. Twelve microsatellite loci were identified using the method of microsatellite-enriched libraries. Polymorphism was assessed in samples (N=62) from four geographically distinct populations in Thailand. Number of alleles per locus ranged from 9 to 15 (average 11.6). Observed and expected heterozygosities varied from 0.28 to 1.0 and from 0.44 to 0.91, respectively. There was no evidence for linkage disequilibrium, however, four loci showed evidence of departure from Hardy–Weinberg equilibrium in one population. Presence of null alleles was not detected in all the 12 loci. These first microsatellites primers developed for L. neilli will provide information on the fine-scale genetic structure of this threatened species and will help in the development of future conservation policies. [less ▲]

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See detailInter- and Intraspecific Genetic Biodiversity in South East Asian Rodents: New Insights for Their Conservation
Pagès, Marie ULg; Latinne, Alice ULg; Michaux, Johan ULg

in Zachos, F. E.; Habel, J. C. (Eds.) Biodiversity Hotspots (2011)

South East Asia displays a high level of mammal endemism and the highest number of threatened and data deficient mammal species. However, the South East Asian biodiversity is still highly unexplored ... [more ▼]

South East Asia displays a high level of mammal endemism and the highest number of threatened and data deficient mammal species. However, the South East Asian biodiversity is still highly unexplored. Because of the runaway global changes, a better biological knowledge of this region is urgently required to improve the conservation and the management of its biodiversity. The first aim of this chapter is to present recent published data on a biodiversity inventory of the Rattini murine rodents from this region based on molecular markers (Page`s et al., 2009). In this first study, we applied the method proposed by Pons et al. (2006) that determines with no a priori the locations of ancestral nodes that define putative species in order to investigate the current taxonomy of the Rattini tribe. Our second aim concerns the intraspecific genetic structure of a rare and threatened South East Asian mammal species: the murine rodent Leopoldamys neilli, endemic to karst habitats . In this latter study, our results evidenced a high geographic structure of the genetic diversity of this species. The observed highly divergent genetic lineages would have to be considered as distinct evolutionary units or at least as Management units. These results are essential for the best conservation issues of species endemic to karsts and to South East Asia, in general. In this chapter, we therefore highlight that South East Asia would not be only a hotspot of interspecific but also of intraspecific biodiversity. [less ▲]

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See detailEvidence of complex phylogeographic structure for the threatened rodent Leopoldamys neilli, in Southeast Asia
Latinne, Alice ULg; Waengsothorn, Surachit; Herbreteau, Vincent et al

in Conservation Genetics (2011), 12

Leopoldamys neilli is a threatened murine rodent species endemic to limestone karsts of Thailand. We have studied the phylogeography of L. neilli using two mitochondrial markers (cytb, COI) and one ... [more ▼]

Leopoldamys neilli is a threatened murine rodent species endemic to limestone karsts of Thailand. We have studied the phylogeography of L. neilli using two mitochondrial markers (cytb, COI) and one nuclear fragment (bfibr), in order to assess the influence of its endemicity to karst habitat. One hundred fifteen individuals of L. neilli were collected in 20 localities throughout the geographic range of this species in Thailand. Our study revealed strong geographic structure of the mtDNA genetic diversity: six highly differentiated, allopatric genetic lineages were observed in our dataset. They exhibit a very high degree of genetic divergence, low gene flow among lineages and low levels of haplotype and nucleotide diversities within lineages. Our results suggest that L. neilli’s populations are highly fragmented due to the scattered distribution of its karst habitat. The most divergent lineage includes the populations from western Thailand, which have been separated from the other genetic lineages since at least the Early Pleistocene. The other lineages are more closely related and have diverged since the Middle Pleistocene. This study revealed an unexpected high level of genetic differentiation within L. neilli and highlighted the high endemicity of this species to limestone karsts. Our results enhance the importance of protecting limestone habitats to preserve not only the species but also intraspecific diversity. [less ▲]

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See detailThai limestone karsts: an impending biodiversity crisis
Latinne, Alice ULg; Waengsothorn, Surachit; Herbreteau, Vincent et al

in The 1st EnvironmentAsia International Conference (2011)

Due to the high level of endemic species that they support and the high threats they are facing, such as unsustainable limestone quarrying, hunting and urbanization, limestone karsts are recognized as ... [more ▼]

Due to the high level of endemic species that they support and the high threats they are facing, such as unsustainable limestone quarrying, hunting and urbanization, limestone karsts are recognized as biodiversity hotspots needing urgent protection. The first aim of our study was to investigate the mammal rodent diversity of Thai limestone karsts. Our second aim was to examine the diversity at a finer scale than the species level (intraspecific biodiversity) using phylogeographic approaches. Therefore, we studied the phylogeographic structure of a threatened rodent, endemic to limestone karsts of Thailand, the Murinae Leopoldamys neilli. We sampled 76 limestone karsts in whole Thailand and live-trapped 444 rodents including 115 Leopoldamys neilli. Our study revealed an important rodent diversity in Thai limestone karsts. Besides endemic rodent species, karsts also host typical forest species to which they provide forest refugia in deforested regions. At the intraspecific level, our study revealed an unexpected high level of genetic differentiation within the rodent species L. neilli. As each limestone area of Thailand is characterized by a particular genetic lineage of L. neilli, the destruction of these karsts would lead to the disappearance of unique intraspecific strains not found elsewhere. Our results highlight the importance of protecting limestone habitats to preserve not only their interspecific but also intraspecific rodent diversity that is highly threatened as more than 20% of limestone karsts in Thailand have already been quarried. Management plans of limestone, a non-renewable resource, should urgently take into account this high biological importance of karsts. [less ▲]

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See detailInvestigating the intraspecific biodiversity of the threatened rodent Leopoldamys neilli in Southeast Asia
Latinne, Alice ULg; Waengsothorn, Surachit; Herbreteau, Vincent et al

Conference (2010, September 23)

We study the phylogeography of Leopoldamys neilli, a threatened murine rodent species endemic to limestone karsts of Thailand, in order to assess the influence of its endemicity to karstic habitat on its ... [more ▼]

We study the phylogeography of Leopoldamys neilli, a threatened murine rodent species endemic to limestone karsts of Thailand, in order to assess the influence of its endemicity to karstic habitat on its intraspecific biodiversity and phylogeographic pattern. Samples of L. neilli were collected in limestone karsts from 20 localities in seven provinces of Thailand. Two mitochondrial markers, the cytochrome b gene (cytb) and the cytochrome c oxydase subunit I gene (COI), were sequenced for 115 L. neilli individuals. A nuclear fragment, the β-fibrinogen intron 7 (bfibr), was amplified in a subset of 65 samples. Phylogenetic reconstructions and median joining networks were used to explore relationships between haplotypes of the studied populations. Haplotype and nucleotide diversities of the main lineages were estimated for each locus. Divergence times of the main lineages of L. neilli were estimated using Bayesian inference. The demographic histories of the main lineages of L.neilli were also examined. Our study gave evidence of a strong geographic structure of the genetic diversity for L. neilli. Six highly differentiated genetic lineages were observed in the phylogenetic and phylogeographic analyses. These lineages are allopatric and correspond to particular regions of Thailand. They exhibit very high degree of genetic divergence and gene flows between them are extremely low. Within each lineage, the levels of haplotype and nucleotide diversities are very low for each gene. These results suggest a severe fragmentation of L. neilli’s populations, correlated to the fragmented distribution of its habitat and highlight its high endemicity to limestone karsts. The strong phylogeographic pattern of L. neilli and the very ancient separation of some lineages could be explained by the geological history of Thailand during Tertiary and Quaternary era. In conclusion, this study revealed an unexpectedly high level of intraspecific biodiversity within the species L. neilli. These results consolidate the importance to strengthen the protection of limestone habitats and to preserve not only their huge interspecific but also intraspecific biodiversity. [less ▲]

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See detailIntraspecific biodiversity in South East asian rodents: new insights for their conservation
Latinne, Alice ULg; Rivière, Taiana; Pagès, Marie ULg et al

Poster (2009, August)

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See detailInter and intra genetic biodiversity in South East asian rodents: new insights for their conservation
Pagès, Marie ULg; Latinne, Alice ULg; Rivière, Taiana et al

Conference (2009, March 28)

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See detailImportance des macaques à queue de cochon (Macaca nemestrina leonina) dans la dispersion des graines : impact sur l’équilibre écologique de la forêt tropicale au parc national de Khao Yai, Thaïlande
Albert, Aurélie ULg; Latinne, Alice ULg; Savini, Tommaso ULg et al

in Folia Primatologica : International Journal of Primatology = Internationale Zeitschrift für Primatologie = Journal international de Primatologie (2009)

Today, many countries of South-East Asia know about the alarming state of the forests existing on their territory and all know that it is essential to save the still existing primary forest but also to ... [more ▼]

Today, many countries of South-East Asia know about the alarming state of the forests existing on their territory and all know that it is essential to save the still existing primary forest but also to enable the regeneration of degraded areas, in particular thanks to reforestation (natural or artificial). To elucidate the role of seed dispersers and to promote their conservation are essential for the conservation of the tropical rainforests. While following a troop of pigtailed macaques (Macaca nemestrina leonina) accustomed to Man in Khao Yai National park (2 168 km ²), Thailand, we will bring important data relating to these seed dispersers potentially necessary but unfortunately vulnerable. Indeed, this species, from which very little has been studied, seems to be essential to the dispersal of many plant species, particularly those inaccessible to smaller frugivores. The results emanating from the first fieldwork already show important characteristics: the dispersal of many seed species, of all kind of size, in all forest types, from primary forest to secondary forest, thanks to various handling techniques. They also seem to show an adaptation in their daily travels according to resources availability. The next fieldworks will enable us to bring more precision in these results and their temporal variations and thus to conclude on the potential role of Macaca nemestrina in the regeneration of the tropical rainforest. [less ▲]

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See detailRodents within the Centre for Thai National Reference Collections (CTNRC), Past, Present and Future
Waengsothorn, Surachit; Kenthao, Anan; Latinne, Alice ULg et al

in Kasetsart Journal. Natural Sciences (2009), 43

The Centre for Thai National Reference Collections (CTNRC) was officially established in 1965, but animal collections in Thailand had been continuously conducted long before this time. This paper gives an ... [more ▼]

The Centre for Thai National Reference Collections (CTNRC) was officially established in 1965, but animal collections in Thailand had been continuously conducted long before this time. This paper gives an historical review of the main steps leading to the constitution of the current collections under the administration of TISTR, with a focus on the rodent collection, which represents about one fifth of the whole mammal specimens. An inventory of the species and genera represented is given. Statistics representing the sampling effort in the different Thai provinces are given. The paper concludes with considerations on the current and future needs and the means necessary to develop and support the efforts of the CTNRC. [less ▲]

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