References of "Lara, Yannick"
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See detailDraft Genome of the Axenic Strain Phormidesmis priestleyi ULC007, a Cyanobacterium Isolated from Lake Bruehwiler (Larsemann Hills, Antarctica)
Lara, Yannick ULg; Durieu, Benoit ULg; Cornet, Luc ULg et al

in Genome Announcements (2017)

Phormidesmis priestleyi ULC007 is an Antarctic freshwater cyanobacte- rium. Its draft genome is 5,684,389 bp long. It contains a total of 5,604 protein- encoding genes, of which 22.2% have no clear ... [more ▼]

Phormidesmis priestleyi ULC007 is an Antarctic freshwater cyanobacte- rium. Its draft genome is 5,684,389 bp long. It contains a total of 5,604 protein- encoding genes, of which 22.2% have no clear homologues in known genomes. To date, this draft genome is the first one ever determined for an axenic cyanobacterium from Antarctica. [less ▲]

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See detailThe BCCM/ULC collection to conserve the biodiversity and study the secondary metabolites of Polar cyanobacteria
Lara, Yannick ULg; Durieu, Benoit ULg; Renard, Marine ULg et al

Poster (2016, November 16)

In the Polar Regions, Cyanobacteria are the key primary producers and main drivers of the food webs in a wide range of aquatic to terrestrial habitats. For example, they build benthic microbial mats in ... [more ▼]

In the Polar Regions, Cyanobacteria are the key primary producers and main drivers of the food webs in a wide range of aquatic to terrestrial habitats. For example, they build benthic microbial mats in lakes and soil crusts. Their success in these harsh cold conditions can probably be explained by particular adaptations to survive freeze/thaw cycles, seasonally contrasted light intensities, high UV radiations, dessication and other environmental stresses. The BCCM/ULC public collection is funded by the Belgian Science Policy Office since 2011. It has obtained the ISO9001 certification for deposition and distribution of strains, as part of the multi-site certification for the BCCM consortium. This collection aims to gather a representative portion of the polar cyanobacterial diversity with different ecological origins (limnetic mats, soil crusts, cryoconites, endoliths,….) and make it available for researchers to study the taxonomy, evolution, adaptations to harsh environmental conditions, pigments, and genomic make-up. It presently includes 226 cyanobacterial strains, of which 119 are of Antarctic origin (catalogue: http://bccm.belspo.be/catalogues/ulc-catalogue-search). As shown by morphological identification, the strains belong to five orders (Synechococcales, Oscillatoriales, Pleurocapsales, Chroococcidiopsidales and Nostocales). The 16S rRNA and ITS sequences of the strains are being characterized. The first 85 Antarctic strains already studied are distributed into 25 Operational Taxonomic Units (OTUs = groups of sequences with > 97,5% 16S rRNA similarity), and thus, represent a quite large diversity. Moreover, strains identified as members of the genera Leptolyngbya or Phormidium appear in several lineages. This supports the idea that there is a need to revise the taxonomy of these polyphyletic genera with a simple filamentous morphology. To better understand the functioning, metabolism and adaptative strategies of cyanobacteria in the extreme Antarctic environment, the genome sequencing of 11 strains has been started. Pair-read data from illumina MiSeq runs were obtained and submitted to a bioinformatic pipeline dedicated to the assembly of genomes and search of sequences involved in the biosynthesis of secondary metabolites. Gene cluster prediction analysis allowed to characterize 20 clusters of NRPS, PKS and hybrid NRPS-PKS from 2 to 66kb. Surprisingly, none of the characterized operons had previously been described in the literature. [less ▲]

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See detailThe ‘cyanobiome’ of Svalbard, High Arctic
Stelmach Pessi, Igor ULg; Laughinghouse, H Dail; Velazquez, David et al

Poster (2016, October 28)

Over the last decades, the Arctic has experienced a warming trend that is nearly twice as high as the global average, a phenomenon known as ‘Arctic amplification’. The impact of warmer temperatures on ... [more ▼]

Over the last decades, the Arctic has experienced a warming trend that is nearly twice as high as the global average, a phenomenon known as ‘Arctic amplification’. The impact of warmer temperatures on Arctic ecosystems is still unclear. Cyanobacteria are the key primary producers in freshwater and terrestrial Arctic ecosystems, where they are the driver for numerous ecological functions. For a better understanding of the impacts of climate change on Arctic ecosystems, baseline knowledge on cyanobacterial diversity and distribution is crucial. Here we investigate, for the first time, the biogeographic patterns of cyanobacterial communities across Svalbard, using 454 pyrosequencing of partial 16S rRNA gene sequences. Samples were taken from distinct ecosystems and biogeographic zones. We also compare the studied communities with similar Antarctic communities. [less ▲]

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See detailThe BCCM/ULC collection to conserve the biodiversity and explore the applied potential of Polar cyanobacteria
Becker, Pierre; SZTERNFELD, P; ANDJELKOVIC, M et al

Poster (2016, October 28)

In the Polar Regions, Cyanobacteria represent key primary producers and are the main drivers of the food webs in a wide range of aquatic to terrestrial habitats. For example, they build benthic microbial ... [more ▼]

In the Polar Regions, Cyanobacteria represent key primary producers and are the main drivers of the food webs in a wide range of aquatic to terrestrial habitats. For example, they build benthic microbial mats in lakes and soil crusts in terrestrial biotopes. They may present interesting features to survive freeze/thaw cycles, seasonally contrasted light intensities, high UV radiations, dessication and other stresses. The BCCM/ULC public collection funded by the Belgian Science Policy Office since 2011 aims to gather a representative portion of the polar cyanobacterial diversity with different ecological origins (limnetic mats, soil crusts, cryoconites, endoliths…). It makes it available for researchers to study the taxonomy, evolution, adaptations to harsh environmental conditions, and genomic make-up. It presently includes 226 cyanobacterial strains, with 119 being of Antarctic origin (catalogue: http://bccm.belspo.be/catalogues/ulc-catalogue-search). An ISO 9001 certificate was obtained for the public deposition and distribution of strains, as part of the multi-site certification for the BCCM consortium. The morphological identification shows that the strains belong to the orders Synechococcales, Oscillatoriales, Pleurocapsales, Chroococcidiopsidales and Nostocales. The 16S rRNA and ITS sequences of the strains are being characterized. Our results show that the Antarctic strains are positioned into 25 OTUs (sequences with > 97,5% 16S rRNA similarity), and thus, represent a quite large diversity. In addition, cyanobacteria are known to produce a wide range of secondary metabolites (e.g. alkaloids, cyclic and linear peptides, polyketides) with bioactive potential. Among these bioactive metabolites, some display antibiotic, anticancer or antifungal effects. In collaboration with the BCCM/IHEM collection of biomedical fungi, a screening of cyanobacterial strains from BCCM/ULC was performed in order to discover potential new antifungal drugs. The analysis of a first set of methanol extracts from 15 different strains put in evidence the antifungal activity of a Phormidium priestleyi isolate. The latter remains active up to 0.5% (v/v) of fungal culture and was able to inhibit the growth of various fungal species among Candida, Cryptococcus, Aspergillus, and Penicillium. The raw extract was subjected to HPLC and a fraction containing the active molecule was obtained. This molecule appeared to be a thermostable hydrophobic compound. Moreover, in vitro toxicological analyses suggest that the compound has a general cytotoxic effect that could be inhibited by the mammalian metabolism. Further analyses are needed to identify the molecule and to determine if it could be a candidate for a new antifungal drug. In summary, the BCCM/ULC public collection serves as a Biological Resource Centre to conserve ex situ and document the biodiversity of polar cyanobacteria, as well as a repository for discovery of novel bioactive compounds. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 37 (3 ULg)
See detailCyanobacterial Diversity In Antarctic Aquatic Microbial Mats
Stelmach Pessi, Igor ULg; Lara, Yannick ULg; Durieu, Benoit ULg et al

Poster (2016, September 08)

Detailed reference viewed: 7 (2 ULg)
See detailThe BCCM/ULC collection to conserve and study the biodiversity of Polar cyanobacteria
Wilmotte, Annick ULg; Renard, Marine ULg; Lara, Yannick ULg et al

Poster (2016, September)

The BCCM/ULC public collection of Cyanobacteria has been funded since 2011 by the Belgian Science Policy Office. BCCM/ULC is currently holding 226 cyanobacterial strains, with 119 being of Antarctic ... [more ▼]

The BCCM/ULC public collection of Cyanobacteria has been funded since 2011 by the Belgian Science Policy Office. BCCM/ULC is currently holding 226 cyanobacterial strains, with 119 being of Antarctic origin (including 3 from the sub-Antarctic). The cyanobacteria constitute the bacterial phylum with the largest morphological diversity and their taxonomy is still a work in progress. In Polar Regions, Cyanobacteria represent key primary producers and are important drivers of the food webs in a wide range of aquatic to terrestrial habitats. For example, they build extensive benthic microbial mats in lakes and soil crusts in terrestrial biotopes. They have adapted to their environment, and may present interesting features to survive freeze/thaw cycles, seasonally contrasted light intensities, high UV radiations, dessication and other stresses. In this poster, we present the results of the 16S rRNA phylogenetic analysis for 76 Antarctic strains. This allows us to illustrate the diversity present in the collection, to detect lineages for which no genome has yet been sequenced, and to pinpoint taxonomic problems that should be addressed in a more comprehensive study. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 32 (4 ULg)
See detailThe BCCM/ULC collection: a Biological Ressource Center to give access to the Antarctic cyanobacterial diversity
Wilmotte, Annick ULg; Renard, Marine ULg; Lara, Yannick ULg et al

Poster (2016, August)

On the Antarctic continent, Cyanobacteria represent the key primary producers and the main drivers of the food webs in a wide range of aquatic to terrestrial habitats. For example, they build benthic ... [more ▼]

On the Antarctic continent, Cyanobacteria represent the key primary producers and the main drivers of the food webs in a wide range of aquatic to terrestrial habitats. For example, they build benthic microbial mats in lakes and soil crusts in terrestrial biotopes. They may present interesting features to survive freeze/thaw cycles, sea-sonally contrasted light intensities, high UV radiations, dessication and other stresses. The BCCM/ULC public collection funded by the Belgian Science Policy Office since 2011 aims to gather a representative portion of the polar cyanobacterial diversity with different ecological origins (limnetic microbial mats, soil crusts, cryoconites, endoliths, etc.). It makes it available for researchers to study the taxonomy, evolu-tion, adaptations to harsh environmental conditions, and genomic make-up. It pres-ently includes 226 cyanobacterial strains, with 119 being of Antarctic origin (cata-logue: http://bccm.belspo.be/catalogues/ulc-catalogue-search). The morphological identification shows that the strains belong to the orders Synechococcales, Oscillatoriales, Pleurocapsales, Chroococcidiopsidales and Nostocales. We present here the molecular datasets showing the diversity of the BCCM/ULC strains, studied on the basis of the 16S rRNA gene. A selection of strains was also characterized by sequencing of rpoC1, recA, and gyrA genes after amplification with newly designed primers. Our results mainly show that 25 OTUs included strains of Antarctic origin. Moreo-ver, strains identified as members of the genera Leptolyngbya or Phormidium ap-pear in several lineages. This supports the need to revise these polyphyletic genera with a simple filamentous morphology. A certain divergence of some Antarctic strains from related strains isolated from other regions can also be observed. It suggests that a portion of the Antarctic cyanobacterial flora may have evolved in-dependently from the cyanobacteria in other continents. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 18 (2 ULg)
See detailDiversity and distribution of microorganisms in microbial mats of Antarctic lakes
Lara, Yannick ULg; Durieu, Benoit ULg; Stelmach Pessi, Igor ULg et al

Conference (2016, August)

The BelSPO project CCAMBIO aims to study the biogeographical distribution of microorganisms in lacustrine microbial mats using a combination of techniques including microscopic observations, strain ... [more ▼]

The BelSPO project CCAMBIO aims to study the biogeographical distribution of microorganisms in lacustrine microbial mats using a combination of techniques including microscopic observations, strain isolation and genetic characterisation, and molecular diversity assessments using Next Generation Sequencing of environmental DNA. The samples were collected in different Antarctic and sub-Antarctic biogeographical regions. Preliminary multivariate analysis of >130 samples revealed strong bioregionalisation patterns in microbial eukaryotes, which are in agreement with the classical subdivision of the Antarctic Realm into Maritime Antarctica, Continental Antarctica and the Sub-Antarctic Islands generally observed in plants and animals. The biogeographic structuring was less strong between the continent and Maritime Antarctica in prokaryotes suggesting more regular dispersal events between these two regions. The Sub-Antarctic assemblages harboured more complex foodwebs, with arthropods, nematods, rotifers, flatworms and annelids as main metazoan groups. Lakes on the continent, however, were characterised by fewer metazoan groups and a greater importance of microbial herbivores and secondary consumers, including a relative high diversity of ciliates and tardigrades. In a first analysis of microbial mats from five Antarctic lakes and an aquatic biofilm from the Sub-Antarctic, the majority of the cyanobacterial OTUs retrieved were related to filamentous taxa such as Leptolyngbya and Phormidium, which are common genera in Antarctic lacustrine microbial mats. However, other phylotypes related to different taxa such as Geitlerinema, Pseudanabaena, Synechococcus, Chamaesiphon, Calothrix and Coleodesmium were also found. Results revealed a much higher diversity than what had been reported using traditional methods and also highlighted remarkable differences between the cyanobacterial communities of the studied lakes. In the coming months, the molecular diversity data will be deposited into the “Microbial Antarctic Resource System (MARS)” presently developed into the webportal ‘biodiversity.aq’. Better knowledge of the diversity and distribution of microorganisms will contribute to a better assessment of their resilience and local/regional responses to global change [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 41 (2 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailCharacterization of Leptolyngbya and Phormidium diversity in Antarctic biotopes
Lara, Yannick ULg; Durieu, Benoit ULg; Borderie, Fabien et al

Poster (2016, August)

Detailed reference viewed: 24 (8 ULg)
See detailThe CCAMBIO project to characterize the biodiversity and distribution of microorganisms in microbial mats of Antarctic lakes
Durieu, Benoit ULg; Lara, Yannick ULg; Obbels, Dagmar et al

Poster (2016, April 29)

The BelSPO project CCAMBIO aims to study the biogeographical distribution of microorganisms in lacustrine microbial mats using a combination of techniques including microscopical observations (light and ... [more ▼]

The BelSPO project CCAMBIO aims to study the biogeographical distribution of microorganisms in lacustrine microbial mats using a combination of techniques including microscopical observations (light and electronic microscopy), strain isolation, and molecular diversity assessment using Next Generation Sequencing. The samples were collected in different Antarctic and sub-Antarctic biogeographical regions. A detailed microscopic study of the Antarctic diatom diversity allowed to revise a number of taxa and discover new ones. A multivariate analysis of diatoms showed that these regions hosted different diatom flora. Endemic diatom taxa were also observed, and a multigene molecular phylogeny of Pinnularia borealis showed a high genetic diversity. Pilot studies were conducted for the microeukaryotes and cyanobacteria to select NGS protocols and bioinformatic pipelines. Preliminary multivariate analysis of over 100 samples revealed that distinct biogeographic zones could be recognized in both the prokaryote and eukaryote data, which is in agreement with the classical subdivision of the Antarctic Realm into Maritime Antarctica, Continental Antarctica and the Sub-Antarctic Islands generally observed in plants and animals. Moreover, Sub-Antarctic assemblages harboured more complex foodwebs, with quite diverse metazoan groups. Lakes on the continent, however, were characterised by fewer metazoan groups and a greater importance of microbial herbivores and secondary consumers, including a relative high diversity of ciliates and tardigrades. Variation partitioning analysis revealed that spatial variables that approximated large-scale regional contrasts in historical (e.g. deglaciation history, geological origin) and climatic factors (e.g. mean annual air temperature) significantly explained the largest portion of the observed variation in community structure for eukaryotes, while in the prokaryote data environmental gradients related to conductivity were more important. In a first analysis of microbial mats from five Antarctic lakes and an aquatic biofilm from the Sub-Antarctic, the majority of the cyanobacterial OTUs retrieved were related to filamentous taxa such as Leptolyngbya and Phormidium, which are common genera in Antarctic lacustrine microbial mats. However, other phylotypes related to different taxa such as Geitlerinema, Pseudanabaena, Synechococcus, Chamaesiphon, Calothrix and Coleodesmium were also found. Results revealed a higher diversity than what had been reported using traditional methods based on microscopic observations and cultivation and also highlighted remarkable differences between the cyanobacterial communities of the studied lakes. In the next months, the molecular diversity data will be deposited into the “Microbial Antarctic Resource System (MARS)” presently developed into the webportal ‘biodiversity.aq’. The better knowledge of the diversity and distribution of microorganisms will contribute to a better assessment of their resilience and local/regional responses to global change. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 64 (4 ULg)
See detailElucidating diversity of thin filamentous mat-forming Antarctic cyanobacteria
Lara, Yannick ULg; Durieu, Benoit ULg; Deblander, Victor ULg et al

Poster (2016, April 29)

Freshwater ecosystems range from glacial cryoecosystems, ice shelf meltwater ponds to perennially ice-covered lakes where conspicuous benthic microbial mat communities constitute most of the biomass. In ... [more ▼]

Freshwater ecosystems range from glacial cryoecosystems, ice shelf meltwater ponds to perennially ice-covered lakes where conspicuous benthic microbial mat communities constitute most of the biomass. In these mats, cyanobacteria form matrices that shelter other organisms, and carry out the primary production. Narrow filamentous cyanobacteria belonging to the genera Leptolyngbya and Phormidium are especially abundant in Antarctic microbial mats and are essential for the formation of matrix. However, the lack of morphological criteria and the small cell size of cyanobacteria belonging to these two genera make their identification problematic. Indeed, they are known as polyphyletic taxa according to botanical and bacteriological criteria. The characterization of strains is the first step for an assessment of the real diversity and for understanding their role in the environment. We designed a polyphasic approach that combines molecular analyses, environmental physiology experiments and microscopic observations. Briefly, we amplified and sequenced three loci (16S rRNA, ITS, and rpoC1) for 31 strains of Leptolyngbya and Phormidium. We performed whole genome sequencing for five strains. Cultures at different stage were observed by light and epifluorescence microscopy. Finally, selected strains were grown in nitrogen-limited. The Leptolyngbya and Phormidium strains were distributed into four lineages. Phylogenetic trees supported the distribution of P. priestleyi strains into at least two potentially new lineages, and L. antarctica strains were separated into one endemic and one cosmopolitan lineage. This was supported by the microscopic observations of 1-year old cultures. Genome analyses revealed the presence of sequences related to the production of secondary metabolites in strains from two of the studied lineages. Secondary metabolites are often known for their antimicrobial activities. Such properties would partly explain how cyanobacterial mats survive to predation and degradation by other bacteria. This work provides the first building block to the understanding of survival strategies developed by mat-forming cyanobacteria and how they succeeded as the most abundant phototrophs on the Antarctic continent. This work was realized in the frame of the BelSPo project CCAMBIO. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 202 (18 ULg)
See detailANNUAL SCIENTIFIC REPORT - Climate change and Antarctic microbial biodiversity (CCAMBIO)
Tytgat, Bjorn; Willems, Anne; Sweetlove, Maxime et al

Report (2015)

Detailed reference viewed: 40 (12 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailEvolution of the Northern Rockweed, Fucus distichus, in a Regime of Glacial Cycling: Implications for Benthic Algal Phylogenetics
Laughinghouse, Haywood, Dail; Müller, Kirsten; Adey, Walter et al

in PLoS ONE (2015), 10(12), 0143795

Northern hemisphere rockweeds (Fucus) are thought to have evolved in the North Pacific and then spread to the North Atlantic following the opening of the Bering Strait. They have dispersed and widely ... [more ▼]

Northern hemisphere rockweeds (Fucus) are thought to have evolved in the North Pacific and then spread to the North Atlantic following the opening of the Bering Strait. They have dispersed and widely speciated in the North Atlantic and its tributary seas. Fucus distichus is likely near the ancestral member of this genus, and studies have shown that there are several species/subspecies in this complex (i.e. F. evanescens and F. gardneri). We used phylogenetic and haplotype analyses to test the phylogenetic relationships and biogeogra- phy of F. distichus. Our data and subsequent analyses demonstrate that, unlike previous studies that lacked samples from an extensive geographical area of the Arctic and Subarc- tic, there is a distinct Arctic haplotype that is the source of subspecies in both the North Pacific and North Atlantic. Fucus distichus occupies a low tide zone habitat, and in Arctic/ Subarctic regions it is adapted to the severe stress of sea ice coverage and disturbance dur- ing many months per year. We hypothesize that the very large geographic area of Arctic and Subarctic rocky shores available to this species during interglacials, supported by large Arctic/Subarctic fringe areas as well as unglaciated refugia during glacial cycles, provided a robust population and gene pool (described by the Thermogeographic Model). This gene pool dilutes that of the more fragmented and area-limited Temperate/Boreal area popula- tions when they are brought together during glacial cycles. We suggest that similar subspe- cies complexes for a variety of Arctic/Subarctic shore biota should be examined further in this context, rather than arbitrarily being split up into numerous species. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 27 (0 ULg)
See detailThe BCCM/ULC culture collection to conserve, document and explore the polar cyanobacterial diversity
Wilmotte, Annick ULg; Renard, Marine ULg; Kleinteich, Julia et al

Poster (2015, September 07)

In Polar Regions, Cyanobacteria represent key primary producers and are the main drivers of the food webs in a wide range of aquatic to terrestrial habitats. For example, they form benthic microbial mats ... [more ▼]

In Polar Regions, Cyanobacteria represent key primary producers and are the main drivers of the food webs in a wide range of aquatic to terrestrial habitats. For example, they form benthic microbial mats in lakes and soil crusts in terrestrial biotopes. They have adapted to their environment, and may present interesting features to survive freeze/thaw cycles, seasonally contrasted light intensities, high UV radiations, dessication and other environmental stresses. The BCCM/ULC public collection funded by the Belgian Science Policy Office since 2011 aims to gather a representative portion of the polar cyanobacterial diversity with different ecological origins (limnetic microbial mats, soil crusts, cryoconites, endoliths, etc.). The collection is available for researchers to study the taxonomy, evolution, adaptations to extreme environmental conditions, and genomic make-up. It presently includes 200 cyanobacterial strains, with 123 being of polar origin (catalogue: http://bccm.belspo.be/catalogues/ulc-catalogue-search). The morphological identification shows that the strains belong to the orders Synechococcales, Oscillatoriales, Pleurocapsales, Chroococcidiopsidales and Nostocales. The large diversity is also supported by the phylogenetic analyses based on the 16S rRNA sequences. This broad distribution makes the BCCM/ULC collection particularly interesting for phylogenomic studies. To this end, the sequencing of the complete genome of 16 selected strains is currently under way. In addition, cyanobacteria produce a wide range of secondary metabolites (e.g. alkaloides, cyclic and linear peptides, polyketides) with different bioactive potential (e.g. antibiotic, antiviral, anticancer, cytotoxic, genotoxic). Bioassays have shown antifungal activities of the cell extracts from strains Plectolyngbya hodgsonii ULC009 and Phormidium priestleyi ULC026. The potential of the polar strains to produce cyanotoxins and other secondary metabolites is currently being studied by ELISA, LC-MS and the detection of genes involved in their production. Due to the geographic isolation and the strong environmental stressors of the habitat, the exploration of these metabolites in Antarctic cyanobacterial strains seems promising for biotechnology or biomedical applications (Biondi et al. 2008). In summary, the BCCM/ULC public collection could serve as a Biological Resource Centre (OECD 2001) to conserve and document the biodiversity of polar cyanobacteria, as well as a repository for discovery of novel bioactive compounds. REFERENCES Biondi, N., Tredici, M., Taton, A., Wilmotte, A., Hodgson, D., Losi, D., & Marinelli, F. (2008) : Cyanobacteria from benthic mats of Antarctic lakes as a source of new bioactivities. Journal of Applied Microbiology, 105(1) : 105- 115 OECD (2001) Biological Resource Centres : Underpinning the Future of Life Sciences and Biotechnology. http://www.oecd.org/science/biotech/2487422.pdf [less ▲]

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See detailGenome sequencing of an endemic filamentous Antarctic cyanobacterium
Lara, Yannick ULg; Verlaine, Olivier ULg; Kleinteich, Julia et al

Poster (2015, August 03)

The strain Phormidium priestleyi ULC007 was isolated from a benthic mat located in a shallow freshwater pond in the Larsemann Hills (69°S), Western Antarctica. This strain belongs to a cyanobacterial ... [more ▼]

The strain Phormidium priestleyi ULC007 was isolated from a benthic mat located in a shallow freshwater pond in the Larsemann Hills (69°S), Western Antarctica. This strain belongs to a cyanobacterial cluster that appeared as potentially endemic (Taton et al. 2006). After obtaining an axenic isolate, we sequenced the genome of this strain in the frame of the BELSPO CCAMBIO project, in order to better understand the functioning, metabolism and adaptative strategies of cyanobacteria to the extreme Antarctic environment. [less ▲]

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See detailThe BCCM/ULC collection : a Biological Ressource Center for polar cyanobacteria
Wilmotte, Annick ULg; Renard, Marine ULg; Lara, Yannick ULg et al

Poster (2015, August 03)

In this study, during the 2013 MicroFun expedition, we sampled 72 locations around Svalbard including diverse biotopes such as glacial forefields, tundra soils, hot springs, soil crusts, microbial mats ... [more ▼]

In this study, during the 2013 MicroFun expedition, we sampled 72 locations around Svalbard including diverse biotopes such as glacial forefields, tundra soils, hot springs, soil crusts, microbial mats, wet walls, cryoconites, plankton and periphyton, in order to (1) assess the biodiversity of cyanobacteria around Svalbard, (2) verify the existence of biogeographical trends around the archipelago, and (3) compare these data with other polar (cold) areas, especially Antarctica. We used a pyrosequencing approach targeting cyanobacteria-specific 16S rRNA gene sequences to deeply study the cyanobacterial communities. [less ▲]

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Full Text
See detailBasics on cyanobacterial genetics
Wilmotte, Annick ULg; Lara, Yannick ULg

Scientific conference (2015, July 03)

Detailed reference viewed: 95 (3 ULg)
See detail‘Ex-situ’ preservation and characterization of Antarctic cyanobacteria in the BCCM/ULC collection
Kleinteich, Julia ULg; Renard, Marine ULg; Simons, Véronique et al

Poster (2015, June 09)

The BCCM/ULC public collection of (sub)polar cyanobacteria is funded since 2011 by the Belgian Science Policy Office. An ISO9001 certificate was obtained for the public deposition and distribution of ... [more ▼]

The BCCM/ULC public collection of (sub)polar cyanobacteria is funded since 2011 by the Belgian Science Policy Office. An ISO9001 certificate was obtained for the public deposition and distribution of strains, as part of the multi-site certification for the BCCM consortium. BCCM/ULC is currently holding 160 public cyanobacterial strains and the catalogue is available on http://bccm.belspo.be/catalogues/ulc-catalogue-search. Continuous maintenance of living cultures, some of which are also cryopreserved, ensure the preservation and the possibility to rapidly deliver strains to clients for fundamental and applied research. The main holding of the collection concerns (sub)polar strains isolated from different biotopes and representative of a large taxonomic diversity. The molecular characterization is underway, on the basis of 16S rRNA and ITS sequences, but also Multiple Locus Sequence Analysis and genome sequencing. In addition, cyanobacteria are known to produce a range of secondary metabolites (e.g. alkaloides, cyclic and linear peptides, polyketides) with various bioactive potential. The presence of genes involved in the production of microcystin is currently studied by PCR, and analytical methods are used to confirm the toxin production. Due to the geographic isolation and the strong environmental stressors of the habitat, the exploration of these metabolites in Antarctic cyanobacterial strains seems especially promising for biotechnology or biomedical applications. [less ▲]

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Peer Reviewed
See detailPhylogenetic analysis of cultivation-resistant terrestrial cyanobacteria with massive sheaths (Stigonema spp. and Petalonema alatum, Nostocales, Cyanobacteria) using single-cell and filament sequencing of environmental samples
Mares, Jan; Lara, Yannick ULg; Dadakova, Ina et al

in Journal of Phycology (2015), 51(2), 288297

Molecular assessment of a large portion of traditional cyanobacterial taxa has been hindered by the failure to isolate and grow them in culture. In this study, we developed an optimized protocol for ... [more ▼]

Molecular assessment of a large portion of traditional cyanobacterial taxa has been hindered by the failure to isolate and grow them in culture. In this study, we developed an optimized protocol for single cell/filament isolation and 16S rRNA gene sequencing of terrestrial cyanobacteria with large mucilaginous sheaths, and applied it to determine the phylogenetic position of typical members of the genera Petalonema and Stigonema. A methodology based on a glass-capillary isolation technique and a semi-nested PCR protocol enabled reliable sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene from all samples analyzed. Ten samples covering seven species of Stigonema from Europe, North and Central America, and Hawaii, and the type species of Petalonema from Slovakia were sequenced. Contrary to some previous studies, which proposed a relationship with heteropolar nostocalean cyanobacteria, Petalonema appeared to belong to the family Scytonemataceae. Analysis of Stigonema specimens recovered a unique coherent phylogenetic cluster, substantially broadening our knowledge of the molecular diversity within this genus. Neither the uni- to biseriate species nor the multiseriate species formed monophyletic subclusters within the genus. Typical multiseriate species of Stigonema clustered in a phylogenetic branch derived from uni- to biseriate S. ocellatum Thuret ex Bornet & Flahault in our analysis, suggesting that species with more complex thalli may have evolved from the more simple ones. We propose the technique tested in this study as a promising tool for a future revision of the molecular taxonomy in cyanobacteria. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 54 (4 ULg)
See detailMolecular diversity of microorganisms in Antarctic lacustrine microbial mats
Wilmotte, Annick ULg; Stelmach Pessi, Igor ULg; Sweetlove, Maxime et al

Conference (2015, February)

The BeSPO project CCAMBIO aims to study the biogeographical distribution of microorganisms in lacustrine microbial mats using a combination of techniques including microscopical observations (light and ... [more ▼]

The BeSPO project CCAMBIO aims to study the biogeographical distribution of microorganisms in lacustrine microbial mats using a combination of techniques including microscopical observations (light and electronic), strain isolation, and molecular diversity assessment using Next Generation Sequencing. The samples were collected in different Antarctic and sub-Antarctic biogeographical regions. A multivariate analysis of diatoms showed that these regions hosted different diatom flora. Endemic diatom taxa were also observed, and a multigene molecular phylogeny of Pinnularia borealis showed a high genetic diversity. A new Scenedesmacean species was described from Antarctica, Chodatodesmus australis. A comparison of the bacterial diversity retrieved by cultivation or NGS showed a complementarity of both approaches and differences when different variable regions of the 16S rRNA gene were used. Novel and unclassified sequences, also observed by other authors, were obtained. Pilot studies were conducted for the microeukaryotes and cyanobacteria to select NGS protocols and bioinformatic pipelines. The purpose is to deposit the diversity data in the “Microbial Antarctic Resource System (MARS)” presently developed into the webportal ‘biodiversity.aq’. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 124 (2 ULg)