References of "Landeau, Brigitte"
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See detailRelationships between brain metabolism decrease in normal aging and changes in structural and functional connectivity
Chételat, Gael; Landeau, Brigitte; Salmon, Eric ULg et al

in NeuroImage (2013), 76

Normal aging is characterized by brain glucose metabolism decline predominantly in the prefrontal cortex. The goal of the present study was to assess whether this change was associated with age-related ... [more ▼]

Normal aging is characterized by brain glucose metabolism decline predominantly in the prefrontal cortex. The goal of the present study was to assess whether this change was associated with age-related alteration of white matter (WM) structural integrity and/or functional connectivity. FDG-PET data from 40 young and 57 elderly healthy participants from two research centres (n=49/48 in Centre 1/2) were analyzed. WM volume from T1-weighted MRI (Centre 1), fractional anisotropy from diffusion-tensor imaging (Centre 2), and resting-state fMRI data (Centre 1) were also obtained. Group comparisons were performed within each imaging modality. Then, positive correlations were assessed, within the elderly, between metabolism in the most affected region and the other neuroimaging modalities. Metabolism decline in the elderly predominated in the left inferior frontal junction (LIFJ). LIFJ hypometabolism was significantly associated with macrostructural and microstructural WM disturbances in long association fronto-temporo-occipital fibers, while no relationship was found with functional connectivity. The findings offer new perspectives to understand normal aging processes and open avenues for future studies to explore causality between age-related metabolism and connectivity changes. [less ▲]

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See detailConnectivity within the default mode network is related to working memory performance in young but not elderly healthy adults
Yakushev, Igor; Chételat, Gael; Fischer, Florian et al

in Alzheimer's & Dementia : The Journal of the Alzheimer's Association (2012), 8(4), 81

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See detailThe influence of cognitive reserve on inter-individual variability in resting-state cerebral metabolism in normal aging
Bastin, Christine ULg; Salmon, Eric ULg; Bahri, Mohamed Ali ULg et al

in Alzheimer's & Dementia : The Journal of the Alzheimer's Association (2012), 8(4), 80-81

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See detailThe influence of cognitive reserve on inter-individual variability in resting-state cerebral metabolism in normal aging
Bastin, Christine ULg; Yakushev, Igor; Bahri, Mohamed Ali ULg et al

in Frontiers in Human Neuroscience (2012)

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See detailCognitive reserve impacts on inter-individual variability in resting-state cerebral metabolism in normal aging
Bastin, Christine ULg; Yakushev, Igor; Bahri, Mohamed Ali ULg et al

in NeuroImage (2012), 63

There is a great deal of heterogeneity in the impact of aging on cognition and cerebral functioning. One potential factor contributing to individual differences among the elders is the cognitive reserve ... [more ▼]

There is a great deal of heterogeneity in the impact of aging on cognition and cerebral functioning. One potential factor contributing to individual differences among the elders is the cognitive reserve, which designates the partial protection from the deleterious effects of aging that lifetime experience provides. Neuroimaging studies examining task-related activation in elderly people suggested that cognitive reserve takes the form of more efficient use of brain networks and/or greater ability to recruit alternative networks to compensate for age-related cerebral changes. In this multi-centre study, we examined the relationships between cognitive reserve, as measured by education and verbal intelligence, and cerebral metabolism at rest (FDG-PET) in a sample of 74 healthy older participants. Higher degree of education and verbal intelligence was associated with less metabolic activity in the right posterior temporoparietal cortex and the left anterior intraparietal sulcus. Functional connectivity analyses of resting-state fMRI images in a subset of 41 participants indicated that these regions belong to the default mode network and the dorsal attention network respectively. Lower metabolism in the temporoparietal cortex was also associated with better memory abilities. The findings provide evidence for an inverse relationship between cognitive reserve and resting-state activity in key regions of two functional networks respectively involved in internal mentation and goal-directed attention. [less ▲]

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See detailRelation entre la réserve cognitive et le métabolisme cérébral au repos dans le vieillissement normal.
Bastin, Christine ULg; Yakushev, Igor; Bahri, Mohamed Ali ULg et al

in Proceedings of the XIIème Colloque International sur le Vieillissement Cognitif (2012)

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See detailSleep contributes to the strengthening of some memories over others, depending on hippocampal activity at learning.
Rauchs, Géraldine; Feyers, Dorothée ULg; Landeau, Brigitte et al

in Journal of Neuroscience (2011), 31(7), 2563-2568

Memory consolidation benefits from sleep. Besides strengthening some memory traces, another crucial, albeit overlooked, function of memory is also to erase irrelevant information. Directed forgetting is ... [more ▼]

Memory consolidation benefits from sleep. Besides strengthening some memory traces, another crucial, albeit overlooked, function of memory is also to erase irrelevant information. Directed forgetting is an experimental approach consisting in presenting “to be remembered” and “to be forgotten” information, that allows selectively decreasing or increasing the strength of individual memory traces according to the instruction provided at learning. This paradigm was used in combination with fMRI to determine, in Humans, what specifically triggers at encoding sleep-dependent compared to time-dependent consolidation. Our data indicate that relevant items which subjects strived to memorize are consolidated during sleep to a greater extend than items that participants did not intend to learn. This process appears to depend on a differential activation of the hippocampus at encoding, which acts as a signal for the offline reprocessing of relevant memories during post-learning sleep episodes. [less ▲]

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See detailEvidence for a role of sleep in forgetting of irrelevant information
Collette, Fabienne ULg; Rauchs, Géraldine; Landeau, Brigitte et al

in NeuroImage (2009, June), 47(Suppl 1), 328-

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