References of "Lambert, Charles"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailRac1 GTPase silencing counteracts microgravity-induced effects on osteoblastic cells.
Guignandon, Alain; Fauré, Céline; Neutelings, Thibault et al

in FASEB Journal (2014), 28(9), 4077-4087

Bone cells exposed to real microgravity display alterations of their cytoskeleton and focal adhesions, two major mechanosensitive structures. These structures are controlled by small GTPases of the Ras ... [more ▼]

Bone cells exposed to real microgravity display alterations of their cytoskeleton and focal adhesions, two major mechanosensitive structures. These structures are controlled by small GTPases of the Ras homology (Rho) family. We investigated the effects of RhoA, Rac1, and Cdc42 modulation of osteoblastic cells under microgravity conditions. Human MG-63 osteoblast-like cells silenced for RhoGTPases were cultured in the automated Biobox bioreactor (European Space Agency) aboard the Foton M3 satellite and compared to replicate ground-based controls. The cells were fixed after 69 h of microgravity exposure for postflight analysis of focal contacts, F-actin polymerization, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression, and matrix targeting. We found that RhoA silencing did not affect sensitivity to microgravity but that Rac1 and, to a lesser extent, Cdc42 abrogation was particularly efficient in counteracting the spaceflight-related reduction of the number of focal contacts [-50% in silenced, scrambled (SiScr) controls vs. -15% for SiRac1], the number of F-actin fibers (-60% in SiScr controls vs. -10% for SiRac1), and the depletion of matrix-bound VEGF (-40% in SiScr controls vs. -8% for SiRac1). Collectively, these data point out the role of the VEGF/Rho GTPase axis in mechanosensing and validate Rac1-mediated signaling pathways as potential targets for counteracting microgravity effects [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 31 (9 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailVascular Endothelial Growth Factor-111 (VEGF-111) and tendon healing: preliminary results in a rat model of tendon injury
Kaux, Jean-François ULg; Janssen, Lauriane ULg; Drion, Pierre ULg et al

in Muscles, Ligaments and Tendons Journal (2014), 4(1 (eCollection 2014 Jan)), 25-28

Tendon lesions are among the most frequent musculoskeletal pathologies. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is known to regulate angiogenesis. VEGF-111, a biologically active and proteolysis ... [more ▼]

Tendon lesions are among the most frequent musculoskeletal pathologies. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is known to regulate angiogenesis. VEGF-111, a biologically active and proteolysis-resistant splice variant of this family, was recently identified. This study aimed at evaluating whether VEGF-111 could have a therapeutic interest in tendon pathologies. Surgical section of one Achilles tendon of rats was performed before a local injection of either saline or VEGF-111. After 5, 15 and 30 days, the Achilles tendons of 10 rats of both groups were sampled and submitted to a biomechanical tensile test. The force necessary to induce tendon rupture was greater for tendons of the VEGF-111 group (p<0.05) while the section areas of the tendons were similar. The mechanical stress was similar at 5 and 15 days in the both groups but was improved for the VEGF-111 group at day 30 (p <0.001). No difference was observed in the mRNA expression of collagen III, tenomodulin and MMP-9. In conclusion, we observed that a local injection of VEGF-111 improves the early phases of the healing process of rat tendons after a surgical section. Further confirmatory experimentations are needed to consolidate our results. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 91 (20 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailEmerging pathogenic mechanisms in human myxomatous mitral valve: lessons from past and novel data.
Hulin, Alexia; Deroanne, Christophe ULg; Lambert, Charles ULg et al

in Cardiovascular Pathology (2013), 22

Detailed reference viewed: 33 (6 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailNew prospects in the roles of the C-terminal domains of VEGF-A and their cooperation for ligand binding, cellular signaling and vessels formation.
Delcombel, Romain ULg; Janssen, Lauriane ULg; Vassy, Roger et al

in Angiogenesis (2013), 16(2), 353-71

VEGF-A is a crucial growth factor for blood vessel homeostasis and pathological angiogenesis. Due to alternative splicing of its pre-mRNA, VEGF-A is produced under several isoforms characterized by the ... [more ▼]

VEGF-A is a crucial growth factor for blood vessel homeostasis and pathological angiogenesis. Due to alternative splicing of its pre-mRNA, VEGF-A is produced under several isoforms characterized by the combination of their C-terminal domains, which determines their respective structure, availability and affinity for co-receptors. As controversies still exist about the specific roles of these exon-encoded domains, we systematically compared the properties of eight natural and artificial variants containing the domains encoded by exons 1-4 and various combinations of the domains encoded by exons 5, 7 and 8a or 8b. All the variants (VEGF(111)a, VEGF(111)b, VEGF(121)a, VEGF(121)b, VEGF(155)a, VEGF(155)b, VEGF(165)a, VEGF(165)b) have a similar affinity for VEGF-R2, as determined by Surface plasmon resonance analyses. They strongly differ however in terms of binding to neuropilin-1 and heparin/heparan sulfate proteoglycans. Data indicate that the 6 amino acids encoded by exon 8a must be present and cooperate with those of exons 5 or 7 for efficient binding, which was confirmed in cell culture models. We further showed that VEGF(165)b has inhibitory effects in vitro, as previously reported, but that the shortest VEGF variant possessing also the 6 amino acids encoded by exon 8b (VEGF(111)b) is remarkably proangiogenic, demonstrating the critical importance of domain interactions for defining the VEGF properties. The number, size and localization of newly formed blood vessels in a model of tumour angiogenesis strongly depend also on the C-terminal domain composition, suggesting that association of several VEGF isoforms may be more efficient for treating ischemic diseases than the use of any single variant. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 62 (23 ULg)
See detailGenome-wide analysis of the effect of heavy ions bombardment on gene expression and alternative splicing by neuronal cells.
Lambert, Charles ULg; Ernst, Eric; Quintens, R et al

Conference (2012, June 18)

Detailed reference viewed: 13 (1 ULg)
See detailSinduced alternative splcing eventstudy of camptothecin- and cisplatin-
Deward, Adeline; Gabriel, Maude; Delforge, Yves et al

Poster (2012, May 11)

Various genotoxic drugs used in cancer therapy induce alternative splicing or pre-messenger RNA. The nature and the intensity of alternative splicing was compared for Camptothecin, Cisplatin and .

Detailed reference viewed: 9 (2 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailPlatelet-rich plasma (PRP) and tendon healing: animal model
Kaux, Jean-François ULg; Drion, Pierre ULg; Renouf, Julien et al

in British Journal of Sports Medicine (2011, February), 45(2), 1

Introduction: The tendon is a tissue which does not heal easily. Recently, several studies have demonstrated the positive effects of platelets on the healing process of tendons. A local injection of ... [more ▼]

Introduction: The tendon is a tissue which does not heal easily. Recently, several studies have demonstrated the positive effects of platelets on the healing process of tendons. A local injection of platelet–rich plasma (PRP), which releases in situ many growth factors, has the potentiality to enhance the tendon healing process. The aim of our experiment was to ascertain by an original mechanical measure whether the use of PRP was of interest for accelerating the healing process of rats’ Achilles tendons after surgical induced lesion. Methods: A 5mm defect was surgically induced in 90 rats’ Achilles tendon. Rats were divided into 2 groups of 45: (A) control (no treatment) and (B) PRP treatment. Rats of group B received a PRP injection in situ after the surgery. Afterwards, rats of both groups were placed in their cages without immobilization. After 5, 15 and 30 days, 10 traumatized Achilles tendons of each group were dissected and removed. Immediately after sampling, tendons were submitted to a biomechanical tensile test up to rupture, using a “Cryo-jaw”. After that, transcriptomic analyses were made on the tendon samples, to study the expression of type III collagen, matrix metalloproteases and tenomodulin. A hydroxyproline dosage was done to quantify the collagen in the tendon during its healing process. Tendons of the 15 remaining rats of each group were subjected to a histological study, respectively at day 5, 15 and 30 (5 rats for each time). Results: We demonstrated that the force necessary to induce tendon rupture during biomechanical tensile test study was greater for tendons which had been submitted to an injection of PRP compared to the control group: +19% (day 5), +30% (day 15) and +43% (day 30). Histological study showed that PRP could enhance cells proliferation, angiogenesis and collagen organisation. Our biochemical analyses did not explain beneficial effects of PRP. Indeed, there was no significant difference neither between the expression of different studied genes, nor in the quantity of hydroxyproline between both groups. Conclusion: This experimentation has shown that a PRP injection could accelerate the tendons healing process and improve its quality. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 163 (24 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailTendon lesion and platelet-rich plasma (PRP) injection: rat model
Kaux, Jean-François ULg; Drion, Pierre ULg; Renouf, Julien et al

in Annual Congress of the RBSPRM (2010, December 03)

Introduction: For a few years, the positive effect of platelets on the healing process of different tissues (skin, bones...) was demonstrated. In fact platelets contain lots of growth factors which can be ... [more ▼]

Introduction: For a few years, the positive effect of platelets on the healing process of different tissues (skin, bones...) was demonstrated. In fact platelets contain lots of growth factors which can be release locally and enhance the healing process. Thus the aim of our experiment was to ascertain by an original mechanical measure whether the use of PRP was of interest for accelerating the healing process of rats’ Achilles tendons after surgical induced lesion. Methods: Ninety rats’ Achilles tendons were sectioned. Forty-two rats beneficed of a PRP injection in situ. After 5, 15 and 30 days, 15 rats of both groups were euthanized after tendon sampling which were immediately submitted to a biomechanical tensile test until tendon rupture, using an original method of measurement (“cryo-jaw”). Histological and biochemical analyses were made as well as a quantification of collagen with an original procedure (quantification of the “greys” on histological cross-sections). Results: Tendons in the PRP group were more resistant to rupture than those in the control group. Histological findings showed in this group an increase of collagen proliferation and better collagen fibres reorganization. However, we did not find any biochemical difference neither in term of encoding gene expression for type III collagen, matrix metalloprotease 9 and tenomodulin. Conclusion: Our animal study demonstrated that an injection of PRP could accelerate the tendons healing process and improve its quality. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 95 (13 ULg)