References of "Lambert, C"
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See detailPrimary immune thrombocytopenia in adults
Janssens, A.; Lambert, C.; Bries, G. et al

in Belgian Journal of Hematology (2013), 4(1), 2-11

The Belgian Hematological Society (BHS) guideline panel on adult primary immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) reviewed the recent literature on diagnosis and treatment to make recommendations on the best ... [more ▼]

The Belgian Hematological Society (BHS) guideline panel on adult primary immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) reviewed the recent literature on diagnosis and treatment to make recommendations on the best strategies for frontline and subsequent-line treatment. No treatment is necessary for patients with platelet counts higher than 30000/ l in the absence of bleeding symptoms. Patients newly diagnosed or relapsing after a long-term treatment-free period can be managed with corticosteroids with or without intravenous immunoglobulins. A second line therapy is indicated for those patients who are intolerant or unresponsive to or relapse after initial corticosteroid treatment and have a risk of bleeding. The guideline panel recommends splenectomy as it is the treatment with the highest curative potential and an acceptable safety pro le. If possible, splenectomy should be delayed to at least twelve months after diagnosis as spontaneous remission can occur in this time period. Thrombopoietin receptor (TPO-R) agonists are recommended for patients who are refractory to or relapse after splenectomy or who have a contra-indication to splenectomy irrespective of the duration of ITP. The guideline panel agrees that rituximab, azathioprine, cyclophosphamide, cyclosporine A, danazol, dapsone, mycophenolate mofetil and vincristine/vinblastine are potential treatment options, especially for patients refractory to TPO-R agonists. [less ▲]

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See detailPerformance of three HIV-1 DNA real-time PCRs for early diagnosis in infants and adults
Iserentant, G.; Masquelier, C.; Lambert, C. et al

Poster (2011, March)

Background Early pediatric HIV-1 diagnosis is a challenge in resource limited countries to identify HIV-infected newborns to provide early ART treatment. HIV DNA PCR testing is an accurate method for ... [more ▼]

Background Early pediatric HIV-1 diagnosis is a challenge in resource limited countries to identify HIV-infected newborns to provide early ART treatment. HIV DNA PCR testing is an accurate method for diagnosis in newborns and could be valuable for monitoring HIV infection in adults. We have evaluated the analytical, clinical performances and genotype inclusivity of 3 real-time Taqman PCRs targeting the ltr, int and env genes. Material and methods Total DNA was extracted from whole blood and Dried Blood Spots (DBS) using the NucleoSpin Blood kit (Macherey Nagel) and the Chelex resin. DNA amplification was performed using the Qiagen Multiplex PCR kit and detected on a 7300 Real time PCR system (Applied Biosystems). Method validation was realized as required by ISO 15189 standard. The accuracy profile methodology was applied. HIV-1 DNA of ACH2 cells (0, 25, 50, 100, 1000 and 5000 copies/PCR) mixed in whole blood were measured in 4 different series (2 PCR kits and 2 operators) of 5 independent DNA extraction of each standard. Linear and quadratic weighted and non weighted regression models were tested. Trueness, precision, limit of quantifications of the method and accuracy of the results were obtained for each model and compared. 93 whole blood samples of ART treated-patients with undetectable or low viraemia of 16 B and 77 non-B subtypes were assessed. Clinical evaluation of the assay was performed on 26 whole blood samples and 238 DBS from infants of Guinea Conakry determined HIV+ using the rapid Bioline HIV test Results The calibration model providing the most accurate results was the linear regression with an r² equal to 0.92 for ltr, 0.88 for int and 0.95 for env. Trueness, precision and accuracy were highly acceptable for the 3 sets of primers/probe not exceeding -0.23 log(copies/PCR) for bias and 0.5 log(copies) for intermediate precision standard deviation, respectively. The estimated lower limit of quantification was 41, 475 and 25 copies/PCR for ltr, int and env respectively. The accuracy profile of each gene showed that each future measurement using this assay has 80% probability to be within a limit of 0.5 log (copies/PCR) around the reference or true value of copies of each gene. 52/93 whole blood samples of ART-treated patients had 3 positive genes (Ct<40 cycles), 38/93 had two positive genes and 4/93 had only one positive gene (ltr). Among these patients, 3 were assigned as long term progressors and one was a subtype C strain. Clinical evaluation of the assay identified 1 HIV-1 infected newborn and 3 adults (at least 2 positive genes) for which HIV-1 infection was confirmed either by serology or viral load techniques as well as 96 HIV-1 infected infants using DBS. Conclusions This assay is suitable for detection of proviral HIV-1 DNA in infants and adults on whole blood and DBS samples. Despite an estimated lower limit of quantification higher than ltr and env, the int PCR was required to achieve a good genotype inclusivity. The method was fully validated as required by ISO 15189 and showed to provide sufficiently reliable results. [less ▲]

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See detailThe in vitro influences of neurotensin on the motility characteristics of human U373 glioblastoma cells
Servotte, S.; Camby, I.; Debeir, O. et al

in Neuropathology & Applied Neurobiology (2006), 32(6), 575-584

Astrocytic tumours are associated with dismal prognoses due to their pronounced ability to diffusely invade the brain parenchyma. Various neuropeptides, including gastrin, are able to modulate tumour ... [more ▼]

Astrocytic tumours are associated with dismal prognoses due to their pronounced ability to diffusely invade the brain parenchyma. Various neuropeptides, including gastrin, are able to modulate tumour astrocyte migration. While neurotensin has been shown to influence the proliferation of glioma cells and the migratory ability of a large set of other cell types, its role in glioma cell migration has never been investigated. Neurotensin-induced modifications to the motility features of human U373 glioblastoma cells therefore constitute the topic of the present study. We evidenced that three subtypes of neurotensin receptors (NTR1, NTR2 and NTR3) are expressed in U373 glioblastoma cells, at least as far as their mRNAs are concerned. Treating U373 tumour cells with 10 nM neurotensin markedly modified the morphological patterns of these cells and also profoundly altered the organization of their actin cytoskeletons. Pull-down assays revealed that neurotensin induced the activation in U373 cells of both Rac1 and Cdc42 but not RhoA. Scratch wound assays evidenced that neurotensin (0.1 and 10 nM) very significantly inhibited wound colonization by U373 cells cultured in the absence of serum. In addition, quantitative phase-contrast videomicroscopy analyses showed that neurotensin decreases the motility levels of U373 glioblastoma cells when these cells are cultured on plastic. In sharp contrast, neurotensin stimulates the motility of U373 cells when they are cultured on laminin, which is a pro-adhesive extracellular matrix component ubiquitously secreted by glioma cells. Our data thus strongly suggest that, in addition to gastrin, neurotensin is a neuropeptide capable of modulating tumour astrocyte migration into the brain parenchyma. [less ▲]

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See detailElongator depletion causes defective transcript elongation of genes that regulate cell motility
Close, Pierre ULg; Hawkes, N; Cornez, I et al

Poster (2005, November 15)

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See detailHigh incidence of complications after 2-chloro-2'-deoxyadenosine combined with cyclophosphamide in patients with advanced lymphoproliferative malignancies.
Van Den Neste, E.; Michaux, L.; LAYIOS, Nathalie ULg et al

in Annals of Hematology (2004), 83(6), 356-63

The combination of purine analogs with alkylating agents is able to produce a synergistic antitumoral effect. However, the addition of immunosuppressive and DNA-targeting agents might increase purine ... [more ▼]

The combination of purine analogs with alkylating agents is able to produce a synergistic antitumoral effect. However, the addition of immunosuppressive and DNA-targeting agents might increase purine analog-related complications. The risk for serious complications was evaluated in 38 patients treated with 2-chloro-2'-deoxyadenosine (CDA) and cyclophosphamide (CP). The diagnoses were chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) in 15, Waldenstrom's macroglobulinemia in 4, mantle cell lymphoma in 6, follicular non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) in 10, and other low-grade NHL in 3 patients. All patients were pretreated (median: 2 lines, range: 1-5) and 23 (61%) were refractory. The patients received a median of two courses (range: 1-5) of 5.6 mg/m(2) CDA, followed by a median of 200 mg/m(2) CP, for 3 days. The response rate was 51% [complete remission (CR): 14%, partial remission (PR): 38%]. Grade 3/4 infections occurred in 16 (42%) patients. Dose-limiting cytopenias were seen in 22 (58%) patients. In 12 (32%) patients, autoimmune manifestations developed requiring treatment in most of them. Second cancers arose in five (13%) patients (myelodysplastic syndrome/acute myelocytic leukemia in three, lung cancer in two). Multivariate analysis showed that cytopenias, gender (F), prior radiotherapy, and age (>65 years) predicted for the complications seen after CDA-CP. To conclude, because of the high incidence of complications, caution is warranted in selecting patients with advanced lymphoid malignancies for the CDA-CP protocol. [less ▲]

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See detailLocalisation des séquences régulatrices de la transcription. Application aux gènes de la famille de la prolactine.
Belayew, A.; Bellefroid, Eric J.; Berwaer, M. et al

in Annales d'Endocrinologie (1986), 47

We are studying nucleotide sequences responsible for the regulation of eukaryotic gene expression. Our test system comprises the human genes coding for prolactin (hPRL), growth hormone (hGH-N) and ... [more ▼]

We are studying nucleotide sequences responsible for the regulation of eukaryotic gene expression. Our test system comprises the human genes coding for prolactin (hPRL), growth hormone (hGH-N) and placental lactogen (hCS-B). We have cloned these genes and are searching within their sequences for in vitro binding sites of the human glucocorticoid receptor on the hGH-N and hCS-B genes; the in vivo activity of such DNA sequences by assaying hybrid gene expression in transfected cells; in vivo "enhancer" activity of different hPRL gene fragments linked to a marker gene and transfected in cultured cells. [less ▲]

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See detailLocation of transcriptional and regulatory sequences within the prolactin family genes
Belayew, A.; Bellefroid, Eric J.; Berwaer, M. et al

in Müller, E. E.; McLeod, R. M. (Eds.) Neuroendocrine Perspectives (1986)

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See detailLocalisation des séquences régulatrices de la transcription. Application aux gènes de la famille prolactine.
Belayew, A.; Bellefroid, Eric J.; Berwaer, M. et al

in Annales d'Endocrinologie (1986), 47

We are studying nucleotide sequences responsible for the regulation of eukaryotic gene expression. Our test system comprises the human genes coding for prolactin (hPRL), growth hormone (hGH-N) and ... [more ▼]

We are studying nucleotide sequences responsible for the regulation of eukaryotic gene expression. Our test system comprises the human genes coding for prolactin (hPRL), growth hormone (hGH-N) and placental lactogen (hCS-B). We have cloned these genes and are searching within their sequences for in vitro binding sites of the human glucocorticoid receptor on the hGH-N and hCS-B genes; the in vivo activity of such DNA sequences by assaying hybrid gene expression in transfected cells; in vivo "enhancer" activity of different hPRL gene fragments linked to a marker gene and transfected in cultured cells. [less ▲]

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See detailLocation of transcriptional regulatory sequences within the prolactin family genes.
Belayew, A.; Bellefroid, Eric J.; Berwaer, M. et al

in Neuroendocrine Perspectives. (1986)