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See detailModel-Based Stressed Blood Volume is an Index of Fluid Responsiveness
Pironet, Antoine ULg; Dauby, Pierre ULg; Chase, J. Geoffrey et al

Conference (2015, September 01)

Fluid therapy is frequently used to manage acute circulatory failure. This therapy aims to restore cardiac output by fluid administration, which increases the quantity of fluid in the circulation. However ... [more ▼]

Fluid therapy is frequently used to manage acute circulatory failure. This therapy aims to restore cardiac output by fluid administration, which increases the quantity of fluid in the circulation. However, it has been shown to be effective only in certain cases, leading to the need for indices of fluid responsiveness. Total stressed blood volume has recently been shown to be such an index of fluid responsiveness. However, the current methods to determine this parameter require specific procedures. In this work, a more straightforward method is developed using data available in the intensive care unit. A simple three-chamber cardiovascular system model is used, of which total stressed blood volume is a parameter. All model parameters (including total stressed blood volume) are adjusted to pig experimental data during fluid administrations. The resulting value of total stressed blood volume is always negatively associated with the relative change in cardiac output after fluid administration. This finding confirms that total stressed blood volume is an index of fluid responsiveness. Another finding of this study is that the response curves are subject-specific. The method developed in this work can be applied to humans, since the data required is typically available in an intensive care unit. [less ▲]

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See detailModel-Based Stressed Blood Volume is an Index of Fluid Responsiveness
Pironet, Antoine ULg; Dauby, Pierre ULg; Chase, J. Geoffrey et al

in IFAC PapersOnLine (2015, September)

Fluid therapy is frequently used to manage acute circulatory failure. This therapy aims to restore cardiac output by fluid administration, which increases the quantity of fluid in the circulation. However ... [more ▼]

Fluid therapy is frequently used to manage acute circulatory failure. This therapy aims to restore cardiac output by fluid administration, which increases the quantity of fluid in the circulation. However, it has been shown to be effective only in certain cases, leading to the need for indices of fluid responsiveness. Total stressed blood volume has recently been shown to be such an index of fluid responsiveness. However, the current methods to determine this parameter require specific procedures. In this work, a more straightforward method is developed using data available in the intensive care unit. A simple three-chamber cardiovascular system model is used, of which total stressed blood volume is a parameter. All model parameters (including total stressed blood volume) are adjusted to pig experimental data during fluid administrations. The resulting value of total stressed blood volume is always negatively associated with the relative change in cardiac output after fluid administration. This finding confirms that total stressed blood volume is an index of fluid responsiveness. Another finding of this study is that the response curves are subject-specific. The method developed in this work can be applied to humans, since the data required is typically available in an intensive care unit. [less ▲]

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See detailMathematical modeling of extracorporeal CO2 removal
Habran, Simon ULg; Dauby, Pierre ULg; Desaive, Thomas ULg et al

Poster (2015, August)

Extra¬cor¬poreal CO2 removal devices (ECCO2R) can be used in clinics to decarboxylate blood externally for patients suffering from pulmonary insufficiencies like acute respiratory distress syndrome. In ... [more ▼]

Extra¬cor¬poreal CO2 removal devices (ECCO2R) can be used in clinics to decarboxylate blood externally for patients suffering from pulmonary insufficiencies like acute respiratory distress syndrome. In this work, a model of the respiratory system coupled with such a device is proposed to analyze the decrease of CO2 partial pressure in blood as a function of blood flow through the device. This model provides a mathematical tool which could help clinicians to choose the optimal settings of ECCO2R. [less ▲]

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See detailMolding thrombus of an ECMO cannula floating in the right atrium.
MORIMONT, Philippe ULg; LAMBERMONT, Bernard ULg; GARSPARD, Valérie ULg et al

in Intensive Care Medicine (2015)

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See detailVeno-venous extracorporeal CO2 removal improves pulmonary hemodynamics in a porcine ARDS model
MORIMONT, Philippe ULg; GUIOT, Julien ULg; Desaive, Thomas ULg et al

in Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica (2015)

BACKGROUND: Protective lung ventilation is recommended in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) to minimize additional injuries to the lung. However, hypercapnic acidosis resulting from ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Protective lung ventilation is recommended in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) to minimize additional injuries to the lung. However, hypercapnic acidosis resulting from ventilation at lower tidal volume enhances pulmonary hypertension and might induce right ventricular (RV) failure. We investigated if extracorporeal veno-venous CO2 removal therapy could have beneficial effects on pulmonary circulation and RV function. METHODS: This study was performed on an experimental model of ARDS obtained in eight anaesthetized pigs connected to a volume-cycled ventilator. A micromanometer-tipped catheter was inserted into the main pulmonary artery and an admittance micromanometer-tipped catheter was inserted into the right ventricle. RV-arterial coupling was derived from RV pressure-volume loops. ARDS was obtained by repeated bronchoalveolar lavage. Protective ventilation was then achieved, and the pigs were connected to a pump-driven extracorporeal membrane oxygenator (PALP, Maquet, Germany) in order to achieve CO2 removal. RESULTS: ARDS induced severe hypercapnic acidosis. Systolic pulmonary artery pressure significantly increased from 29.6 ± 1.8 to 43.9 ± 2.0 mmHg (P < 0.001). After the PALP was started, acidosis was corrected and normocarbia was maintained despite protective ventilation. Pulmonary artery pressure significantly decreased to 31.6 ± 3.2 mmHg (P < 0.001) and RV-arterial coupling significantly improved (RV-arterial coupling index = 1.03 ± 0.33 vs. 0.55 ± 0.41, P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: Veno-venous CO2 removal therapy enabled protective ventilation while maintaining normocarbia during ARDS. CO2 removal decreased pulmonary hypertension and improved RV function. This technique may be an effective lung- and RV-protective adjunct to mechanical ventilation. [less ▲]

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See detailRelation between global end-diastolic volume and left ventricular end-diastolic volume
Pironet, Antoine ULg; MORIMONT, Philippe ULg; Kamoi, S. et al

in Critical Care (2015), 19(Suppl 1), 175

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See detailUpdate on the role of extracorporeal CO2 removal
MORIMONT, Philippe ULg; BATCHINSKY, Andriy; LAMBERMONT, Bernard ULg

in Critical Care (2015)

This article is one of ten reviews selected from the Annual Update in Intensive Care and Emergency Medicine 2015 and co-published as a series in Critical Care. Other articles in the series can be found ... [more ▼]

This article is one of ten reviews selected from the Annual Update in Intensive Care and Emergency Medicine 2015 and co-published as a series in Critical Care. Other articles in the series can be found online at http://ccforum.com/series/annualupdate2015. Further information about the Annual Update in Intensive Care and Emergency Medicine is available from http://www.springer.com/series/8901. [less ▲]

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See detailTime-varying respiratory system elastance: a physiological model for patients who are spontaneously breathing.
Chiew, Yeong Shiong; Pretty, Christopher; Docherty, Paul D. et al

in PloS one (2015), 10(1), 0114847

BACKGROUND: Respiratory mechanics models can aid in optimising patient-specific mechanical ventilation (MV), but the applications are limited to fully sedated MV patients who have little or no ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Respiratory mechanics models can aid in optimising patient-specific mechanical ventilation (MV), but the applications are limited to fully sedated MV patients who have little or no spontaneously breathing efforts. This research presents a time-varying elastance (Edrs) model that can be used in spontaneously breathing patients to determine their respiratory mechanics. METHODS: A time-varying respiratory elastance model is developed with a negative elastic component (Edemand), to describe the driving pressure generated during a patient initiated breathing cycle. Data from 22 patients who are partially mechanically ventilated using Pressure Support (PS) and Neurally Adjusted Ventilatory Assist (NAVA) are used to investigate the physiology relevance of the time-varying elastance model and its clinical potential. Edrs of every breathing cycle for each patient at different ventilation modes are presented for comparison. RESULTS: At the start of every breathing cycle initiated by patient, Edrs is < 0. This negativity is attributed from the Edemand due to a positive lung volume intake at through negative pressure in the lung compartment. The mapping of Edrs trajectories was able to give unique information to patients' breathing variability under different ventilation modes. The area under the curve of Edrs (AUCEdrs) for most patients is > 25 cmH2Os/l and thus can be used as an acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) severity indicator. CONCLUSION: The Edrs model captures unique dynamic respiratory mechanics for spontaneously breathing patients with respiratory failure. The model is fully general and is applicable to both fully controlled and partially assisted MV modes. [less ▲]

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See detailModeling of the cardio-pulmonary system assisted by ECMO
Habran, Simon ULg; Dauby, Pierre ULg; Desaive, Thomas ULg et al

in National Day on Biomedical Engineering 2014 (2014, October)

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See detailModelled target attainment after meropenem infusion in patients with severe nosocomial pneumonia: the PROMESSE study.
FRIPPIAT, Frédéric ULg; Musuamba, Flora Tshinanu; Seidel, Laurence ULg et al

in Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy (2014), 70

OBJECTIVES: The objective of this study was to propose an optimal treatment regimen of meropenem in critically ill patients with severe nosocomial pneumonia. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Among 55 patients in ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVES: The objective of this study was to propose an optimal treatment regimen of meropenem in critically ill patients with severe nosocomial pneumonia. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Among 55 patients in intensive care treated with 1 g of meropenem every 8 h for severe nosocomial pneumonia, 30 were assigned to intermittent infusion (II; over 0.5 h) and 25 to extended infusion (EI; over 3 h) groups. Based on plasma and epithelial lining fluid (ELF) concentrations determined at steady-state, pharmacokinetic modelling and Monte Carlo simulations were undertaken to assess the probability of attaining drug concentrations above the MIC for 40%-100% of the time between doses (%T > 1-fold and 4-fold MIC), for 1 or 2 g administered by either method. RESULTS: Penetration ratio, measured by the ELF/plasma ratio of AUCs, was statistically higher in the EI group than in the II group (mean +/- SEM: 0.29 +/- 0.030 versus 0.20 +/- 0.033, P = 0.047). Considering a maximum susceptibility breakpoint of 2 mg/L, all dosages and modes of infusions achieved 40%-100% T > 1-fold MIC in plasma, but none did so in ELF, and only the 2 g dose over EI achieved 40%-100% T > 4-fold MIC in plasma. CONCLUSIONS: The optimum regimen to treat severe nosocomial pneumonia was 2 g of meropenem infused over 3 h every 8 h. This regimen achieved the highest pharmacodynamic targets both in plasma and in ELF. [less ▲]

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See detailDetection of decreased glomerular filtration rate in intensive care units: serum cystatin C versus serum creatinine
DELANAYE, Pierre ULg; CAVALIER, Etienne ULg; Morel, Jérôme et al

in BMC Nephrology (2014), 15(9), 1471-2369

Detailed reference viewed: 21 (7 ULg)