References of "Lambermont, Bernard"
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See detailMolding thrombus of an ECMO cannula floating in the right atrium.
MORIMONT, Philippe ULg; LAMBERMONT, Bernard ULg; GARSPARD, Valérie ULg et al

in Intensive Care Medicine (2015)

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See detailVeno-venous extracorporeal CO2 removal improves pulmonary hemodynamics in a porcine ARDS model
MORIMONT, Philippe ULg; GUIOT, Julien ULg; Desaive, Thomas ULg et al

in Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica (2015)

BACKGROUND: Protective lung ventilation is recommended in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) to minimize additional injuries to the lung. However, hypercapnic acidosis resulting from ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Protective lung ventilation is recommended in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) to minimize additional injuries to the lung. However, hypercapnic acidosis resulting from ventilation at lower tidal volume enhances pulmonary hypertension and might induce right ventricular (RV) failure. We investigated if extracorporeal veno-venous CO2 removal therapy could have beneficial effects on pulmonary circulation and RV function. METHODS: This study was performed on an experimental model of ARDS obtained in eight anaesthetized pigs connected to a volume-cycled ventilator. A micromanometer-tipped catheter was inserted into the main pulmonary artery and an admittance micromanometer-tipped catheter was inserted into the right ventricle. RV-arterial coupling was derived from RV pressure-volume loops. ARDS was obtained by repeated bronchoalveolar lavage. Protective ventilation was then achieved, and the pigs were connected to a pump-driven extracorporeal membrane oxygenator (PALP, Maquet, Germany) in order to achieve CO2 removal. RESULTS: ARDS induced severe hypercapnic acidosis. Systolic pulmonary artery pressure significantly increased from 29.6 ± 1.8 to 43.9 ± 2.0 mmHg (P < 0.001). After the PALP was started, acidosis was corrected and normocarbia was maintained despite protective ventilation. Pulmonary artery pressure significantly decreased to 31.6 ± 3.2 mmHg (P < 0.001) and RV-arterial coupling significantly improved (RV-arterial coupling index = 1.03 ± 0.33 vs. 0.55 ± 0.41, P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: Veno-venous CO2 removal therapy enabled protective ventilation while maintaining normocarbia during ARDS. CO2 removal decreased pulmonary hypertension and improved RV function. This technique may be an effective lung- and RV-protective adjunct to mechanical ventilation. [less ▲]

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See detailModelled target attainment after meropenem infusion in patients with severe nosocomial pneumonia: the PROMESSE study.
FRIPPIAT, Frédéric ULg; Musuamba, FT; Seidel, Laurence ULg et al

in Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy (2015)

OBJECTIVES: The objective of this study was to propose an optimal treatment regimen of meropenem in critically ill patients with severe nosocomial pneumonia. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Among 55 patients in ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVES: The objective of this study was to propose an optimal treatment regimen of meropenem in critically ill patients with severe nosocomial pneumonia. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Among 55 patients in intensive care treated with 1 g of meropenem every 8 h for severe nosocomial pneumonia, 30 were assigned to intermittent infusion (II; over 0.5 h) and 25 to extended infusion (EI; over 3 h) groups. Based on plasma and epithelial lining fluid (ELF) concentrations determined at steady-state, pharmacokinetic modelling and Monte Carlo simulations were undertaken to assess the probability of attaining drug concentrations above the MIC for 40%-100% of the time between doses (%T > 1-fold and 4-fold MIC), for 1 or 2 g administered by either method. RESULTS: Penetration ratio, measured by the ELF/plasma ratio of AUCs, was statistically higher in the EI group than in the II group (mean ± SEM: 0.29 ± 0.030 versus 0.20 ± 0.033, P = 0.047). Considering a maximum susceptibility breakpoint of 2 mg/L, all dosages and modes of infusions achieved 40%-100% T > 1-fold MIC in plasma, but none did so in ELF, and only the 2 g dose over EI achieved 40%-100% T > 4-fold MIC in plasma. CONCLUSIONS: The optimum regimen to treat severe nosocomial pneumonia was 2 g of meropenem infused over 3 h every 8 h. This regimen achieved the highest pharmacodynamic targets both in plasma and in ELF. [less ▲]

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See detailRelation between global end-diastolic volume and left ventricular end-diastolic volume
Pironet, Antoine ULg; MORIMONT, Philippe ULg; Kamoi, S. et al

in Critical Care (2015), 19(Suppl 1), 175

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See detailUpdate on the role of extracorporeal CO2 removal
MORIMONT, Philippe ULg; BATCHINSKY, Andriy; LAMBERMONT, Bernard ULg

in Critical Care (2015)

This article is one of ten reviews selected from the Annual Update in Intensive Care and Emergency Medicine 2015 and co-published as a series in Critical Care. Other articles in the series can be found ... [more ▼]

This article is one of ten reviews selected from the Annual Update in Intensive Care and Emergency Medicine 2015 and co-published as a series in Critical Care. Other articles in the series can be found online at http://ccforum.com/series/annualupdate2015. Further information about the Annual Update in Intensive Care and Emergency Medicine is available from http://www.springer.com/series/8901. [less ▲]

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See detailTime-varying respiratory system elastance: a physiological model for patients who are spontaneously breathing.
Chiew, Yeong Shiong; Pretty, Christopher; Docherty, Paul D. et al

in PloS one (2015), 10(1), 0114847

BACKGROUND: Respiratory mechanics models can aid in optimising patient-specific mechanical ventilation (MV), but the applications are limited to fully sedated MV patients who have little or no ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Respiratory mechanics models can aid in optimising patient-specific mechanical ventilation (MV), but the applications are limited to fully sedated MV patients who have little or no spontaneously breathing efforts. This research presents a time-varying elastance (Edrs) model that can be used in spontaneously breathing patients to determine their respiratory mechanics. METHODS: A time-varying respiratory elastance model is developed with a negative elastic component (Edemand), to describe the driving pressure generated during a patient initiated breathing cycle. Data from 22 patients who are partially mechanically ventilated using Pressure Support (PS) and Neurally Adjusted Ventilatory Assist (NAVA) are used to investigate the physiology relevance of the time-varying elastance model and its clinical potential. Edrs of every breathing cycle for each patient at different ventilation modes are presented for comparison. RESULTS: At the start of every breathing cycle initiated by patient, Edrs is < 0. This negativity is attributed from the Edemand due to a positive lung volume intake at through negative pressure in the lung compartment. The mapping of Edrs trajectories was able to give unique information to patients' breathing variability under different ventilation modes. The area under the curve of Edrs (AUCEdrs) for most patients is > 25 cmH2Os/l and thus can be used as an acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) severity indicator. CONCLUSION: The Edrs model captures unique dynamic respiratory mechanics for spontaneously breathing patients with respiratory failure. The model is fully general and is applicable to both fully controlled and partially assisted MV modes. [less ▲]

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See detailModeling of the cardio-pulmonary system assisted by ECMO
Habran, Simon ULg; Dauby, Pierre ULg; Desaive, Thomas ULg et al

in National Day on Biomedical Engineering 2014 (2014, October)

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See detailDetection of decreased glomerular filtration rate in intensive care units: serum cystatin C versus serum creatinine
DELANAYE, Pierre ULg; CAVALIER, Etienne ULg; Morel, Jérôme et al

in BMC Nephrology (2014), 15(9), 1471-2369

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See detailDoes comfort therapy during controlled donation after circulatory death shorten the life of potential donors?
LEDOUX, Didier ULg; DELBOUILLE, Marie-Hélène ULg; DE ROOVER, Arnaud ULg et al

in Clinical transplantation (2014), 28(1), 47-51

INTRODUCTION: Controlled donation after circulatory death (DCD) remains ethically controversial. The authors developed a controlled DCD protocol in which comfort therapy is regularly used. The aim of this ... [more ▼]

INTRODUCTION: Controlled donation after circulatory death (DCD) remains ethically controversial. The authors developed a controlled DCD protocol in which comfort therapy is regularly used. The aim of this study was to determine whether this policy shortens the DCD donors' life. METHODS: The authors retrospectively analyzed prospectively collected data on patients proposed for DCD at the University Hospital of Liege, Belgium, over a 56-month period. The survival duration of these patients, defined as duration between the time of proposal for DCD and the time of circulatory arrest, was compared between patients who actually donated organs and those who did not. RESULTS: About 128 patients were considered for controlled DCD and 54 (43%) became donors. Among the 74 non-donor patients, 34 (46%) objected to organ donation, 38 patients (51%) were denied by the transplant team for various medical reasons, and two potential DCD donors did not undergo procurement due to logistical and organizational reasons. The survival durations were similar in the DCD donor and non-donor groups. No non-donor patient survived. CONCLUSIONS: Survival of DCD donors is not shortened when compared with non-donor patients. These data support the ethical and respectful approach to potential DCD donors in the authors' center, including regular comfort therapy. [less ▲]

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See detailVisualisation of time-varying respiratory system elastance in experimental ARDS animal models.
van Drunen, Erwin J.; Chiew, Yeong Shiong; Pretty, Christopher et al

in BMC pulmonary medicine (2014), 14

BACKGROUND: Patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) risk lung collapse, severely altering the breath-to-breath respiratory mechanics. Model-based estimation of respiratory mechanics ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) risk lung collapse, severely altering the breath-to-breath respiratory mechanics. Model-based estimation of respiratory mechanics characterising patient-specific condition and response to treatment may be used to guide mechanical ventilation (MV). This study presents a model-based approach to monitor time-varying patient-ventilator interaction to guide positive end expiratory pressure (PEEP) selection. METHODS: The single compartment lung model was extended to monitor dynamic time-varying respiratory system elastance, Edrs, within each breathing cycle. Two separate animal models were considered, each consisting of three fully sedated pure pietrain piglets (oleic acid ARDS and lavage ARDS). A staircase recruitment manoeuvre was performed on all six subjects after ARDS was induced. The Edrs was mapped across each breathing cycle for each subject. RESULTS: Six time-varying, breath-specific Edrs maps were generated, one for each subject. Each Edrs map shows the subject-specific response to mechanical ventilation (MV), indicating the need for a model-based approach to guide MV. This method of visualisation provides high resolution insight into the time-varying respiratory mechanics to aid clinical decision making. Using the Edrs maps, minimal time-varying elastance was identified, which can be used to select optimal PEEP. CONCLUSIONS: Real-time continuous monitoring of in-breath mechanics provides further insight into lung physiology. Therefore, there is potential for this new monitoring method to aid clinicians in guiding MV treatment. These are the first such maps generated and they thus show unique results in high resolution. The model is limited to a constant respiratory resistance throughout inspiration which may not be valid in some cases. However, trends match clinical expectation and the results highlight both the subject-specificity of the model, as well as significant inter-subject variability. [less ▲]

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See detailEarly detection of abnormal left ventricular relaxation in acute myocardial ischemia with a quadratic model.
MORIMONT, Philippe ULg; Pironet, Antoine ULg; Desaive, Thomas ULg et al

in Medical engineering & physics (2014)

AIMS: The time constant of left ventricular (LV) relaxation derived from a monoexponential model is widely used as an index of LV relaxation rate, although this model does not reflect the non-uniformity ... [more ▼]

AIMS: The time constant of left ventricular (LV) relaxation derived from a monoexponential model is widely used as an index of LV relaxation rate, although this model does not reflect the non-uniformity of ventricular relaxation. This study investigates whether the relaxation curve can be better fitted with a "quadratic" model than with the "conventional" monoexponential model and if changes in the LV relaxation waveform due to acute myocardial ischemia could be better detected with the quadratic model. METHODS AND RESULTS: Isovolumic relaxation was assessed with quadratic and conventional models during acute myocardial ischemia performed in 6 anesthetized pigs. Mathematical development indicates that one parameter (Tq) of the quadratic model reflects the rate of LV relaxation, while the second parameter (K) modifies the shape of the relaxation curve. Analysis of experimental data obtained in anesthetized pigs showed that the shape of LV relaxation consistently deviates from the conventional monoexponential decay. During the early phase of acute myocardial ischemia, the rate and non-uniformity of LV relaxation, assessed with the quadratic function, were significantly enhanced. Tq increased by 16% (p<0.001) and K increased by 12% (p<0.001) within 30 and 60min, respectively, after left anterior descending (LAD) coronary artery occlusion. However, no significant changes were observed with the conventional monoexponential decay within 60min of ischemia. CONCLUSIONS: The quadratic model better fits LV isovolumic relaxation than the monoexponential model and can detect early changes in relaxation due to acute myocardial ischemia that are not detectable with conventional methods. [less ▲]

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See detailProcalcitonin for antibiotic treatment in intensive care unit patients
LAYIOS, Nathalie ULg; LAMBERMONT, Bernard ULg

in Current Infectious Disease Reports (2013)

Procalcitonin (PCT), a 116-aminoacids prohormone, has been substantially studied over the last 2 decades in the field of sepsis. Disappointingly low sensitivity values led to the abandonment of the ... [more ▼]

Procalcitonin (PCT), a 116-aminoacids prohormone, has been substantially studied over the last 2 decades in the field of sepsis. Disappointingly low sensitivity values led to the abandonment of the concept of it as a diagnostic tool and then to its being considered more as a prognostic marker with a good correlation with severe infection. Later on, growing concerns about multidrug-resistant bacteria in the ICU environment and about the cost and side effects of antibiotics suggested that PCT might prove to be a valuable asset in stewardship programs. Numerous but hardly comparable randomized controlled trials assessing either initiation or deescalation in ICU patients have been published. Stewardship encompassing PCT should focus on the latter, because of the high negative predictive value of this biomarker. However, there still would be safety concerns if a systematic implementation of PCT were to be considered in daily stewardship programs in the ICU, especially in extra-thoracic sepsis. [less ▲]

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See detailEffects of Neurally Adjusted Ventilatory Assist (NAVA) levels in non-invasive ventilated patients: titrating NAVA levels with electric diaphragmatic activity and tidal volume matching
Chiew, YS; Chase, JG; LAMBERMONT, Bernard ULg et al

in BioMedical Engineering OnLine (2013)

BACKGROUND: Neurally adjusted ventilatory assist (NAVA) delivers pressure in proportion to diaphragm electrical activity (Eadi). However, each patient responds differently to NAVA levels. This study aims ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Neurally adjusted ventilatory assist (NAVA) delivers pressure in proportion to diaphragm electrical activity (Eadi). However, each patient responds differently to NAVA levels. This study aims to examine the matching between tidal volume (Vt) and patients' inspiratory demand (Eadi), and to investigate patient-specific response to various NAVA levels in non-invasively ventilated patients. METHODS: 12 patients were ventilated non-invasively with NAVA using three different NAVA levels. NAVA100 was set according to the manufacturer's recommendation to have similar peak airway pressure as during pressure support. NAVA level was then adjusted ±50% (NAVA50, NAVA150). Airway pressure, flow and Eadi were recorded for 15 minutes at each NAVA level. The matching of Vt and integral of Eadi (ʃEadi) were assessed at the different NAVA levels. A metric, Range90, was defined as the 5-95% range of Vt/ʃEadi ratio to assess matching for each NAVA level. Smaller Range90 values indicated better matching of supply to demand. RESULTS: Patients ventilated at NAVA50 had the lowest Range90 with median 25.6 uVs/ml [Interquartile range (IQR): 15.4-70.4], suggesting that, globally, NAVA50 provided better matching between ʃEadi and Vt than NAVA100 and NAVA150. However, on a per-patient basis, 4 patients had the lowest Range90 values in NAVA100, 1 patient at NAVA150 and 7 patients at NAVA50. Robust coefficient of variation for ʃEadi and Vt were not different between NAVA levels. CONCLUSIONS: The patient-specific matching between ʃEadi and Vt was variable, indicating that to obtain the best possible matching, NAVA level setting should be patient specific. The Range90 concept presented to evaluate Vt/ʃEadi is a physiologic metric that could help in individual titration of NAVA level. [less ▲]

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See detailExpiratory model-based method to monitor ARDS disease state
Van Drunen, EJ; Chiew, YS; Chase, JG et al

in BioMedical Engineering OnLine (2013)

INTRODUCTION: Model-based methods can be used to characterise patient-specific condition and response to mechanical ventilation (MV) during treatment for acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS ... [more ▼]

INTRODUCTION: Model-based methods can be used to characterise patient-specific condition and response to mechanical ventilation (MV) during treatment for acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Conventional metrics of respiratory mechanics are based on inspiration only, neglecting data from the expiration cycle. However, it is hypothesised that expiratory data can be used to determine an alternative metric, offering another means to track patient condition and guide positive end expiratory pressure (PEEP) selection. METHODS: Three fully sedated, oleic acid induced ARDS piglets underwent three experimental phases. Phase 1 was a healthy state recruitment manoeuvre. Phase 2 was a progression from a healthy state to an oleic acid induced ARDS state. Phase 3 was an ARDS state recruitment manoeuvre. The expiratory time-constant model parameter was determined for every breathing cycle for each subject. Trends were compared to estimates of lung elastance determined by means of an end-inspiratory pause method and an integral-based method. All experimental procedures, protocols and the use of data in this study were reviewed and approved by the Ethics Committee of the University of Liege Medical Faculty. RESULTS: The overall median absolute percentage fitting error for the expiratory time-constant model across all three phases was less than 10 %; for each subject, indicating the capability of the model to capture the mechanics of breathing during expiration. Provided the respiratory resistance was constant, the model was able to adequately identify trends and fundamental changes in respiratory mechanics. CONCLUSION: Overall, this is a proof of concept study that shows the potential of continuous monitoring of respiratory mechanics in clinical practice. Respiratory system mechanics vary with disease state development and in response to MV settings. Therefore, titrating PEEP to minimal elastance theoretically results in optimal PEEP selection. Trends matched clinical expectation demonstrating robustness and potential for guiding MV therapy. However, further research is required to confirm the use of such real-time methods in actual ARDS patients, both sedated and spontaneously breathing. [less ▲]

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See detailEvaluation of a Model-Based Hemodynamic Monitoring Method in a Porcine Study of Septic Shock
Revie, James; Stevenson, David; Chase, J. Geoffrey et al

in Computational and Mathematical Methods in Medicine (2013)

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