References of "Lamair, Laura"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
See detailUsing lacustrine sediments to record past natural hazards: The case of Fuji Five Lakes (Japan)
Lamair, Laura ULiege; Hubert, Aurelia ULiege; Yamamoto, Shinya et al

Scientific conference (2017, November 17)

In this presentation, we will focus on the Fuji Five Lakes region. Since 2013, Mt. Fuji and the Fuji Five Lakes area (Lake Motosu, Lake Shoji, Lake Sai, Lake Kawaguchi and Lake Yamanaka) are added on the ... [more ▼]

In this presentation, we will focus on the Fuji Five Lakes region. Since 2013, Mt. Fuji and the Fuji Five Lakes area (Lake Motosu, Lake Shoji, Lake Sai, Lake Kawaguchi and Lake Yamanaka) are added on the world heritage list of UNESCO. Mt. Fuji is a main touristic attraction in Japan bringing each year 300 000 tourists. The Fuji Five Lakes are located at the foot of Mt. Fuji Volcano close to the triple junction where the North American Plate, the Eurasian plate and the Philippine Sea Plate meet. Therefore, the region can be impacted by Mt. Fuji volcanic eruption as well as by large magnitude earthquakes. Additionally, nearly every year, Japan is hit by strong winds, heavy rains with flood, landslides and high waves. These natural hazards may affect the Japanese economy by causing casualties and infrastructure damage. In the regions frequently affected by natural disasters like Japan, it is crucial to have a better knowledge of the recurrence times of such disasters in order to refine the probabilistic models. For that purpose, lacustrine sediments are often used. Lacustrine sediments retrieving by coring offer several advantages compared to onland drilling: the method is cheaper, the cores are easier to take and they have longer temporal span. Lacustrine sediments are generally good archives to record past natural hazards. However, each lake has its own particular setting and a different sensitivity to record paleohazards. Coupling geophysical data, sedimentological analysis and historical records is often required to identify natural paleohazards in the sedimentary records and to define the threshold sensitivity of the lake. Here, we will used Fuji Five Lakes as natural laboratory for the recording of paleohazards (typhoons, earthquakes and volcanic eruptions) and will discuss the sedimentary record of Lake Motosu, Lake Sai, Lake Yamanaka and Lake Kawaguchi over the last ca. 6000 years regarding their geomorphological characteristics. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 33 (0 ULiège)
Peer Reviewed
See detailA 3000 yr paleoseismological history of the central East Anatolian Fault (Turkey) based on sedimentary record of Hazar Lake
Lamair, Laura ULiege; Hubert, Aurelia ULiege; Hage, Sophie et al

Poster (2017, October 10)

The East Anatolian Fault (EAF) is a major left-lateral strike-slip fault accommodating with the conjugate North Anatolian Fault the westward extrusion of the Anatolian Plate away from the Arabia-Eurasia ... [more ▼]

The East Anatolian Fault (EAF) is a major left-lateral strike-slip fault accommodating with the conjugate North Anatolian Fault the westward extrusion of the Anatolian Plate away from the Arabia-Eurasia collision zone. During the 20th century, the EAF activity was mostly quiestcent with only two events of magnitude greater than 6 recorded (1905 Malatya and the 1971 Bingol earthquakes). Historical seismicity suggests that the EAF is capable of generating earthquakes of magnitude greater than 7. In order to retrace the seismic history of the EAF in its central part, we study Hazar Lake. Hazar Lake is a 20 km long pull-apart basin with a maximum depth of 216 m. Short cores and long sediment cores were collected at four different sites to retrieve a paleoseismological record. Detailed analysis of the sediment cores (e.g. magnetic susceptibility, XRF, XRD, thin sections) were performed to identify sedimentary events. The ages of the sedimentary events were inferred based on a detailed age-depth model combining radiocarbon dating and 137Cs/210Pb. In total, 65 radiocarbon dating were done on bulk sediment and on terrestrial organic matter. The results show that Hazar Lake region was impacted by two fault zones: The East Anatolian Fault (EAF) and the North Anatolian Fault. Based on historical documents, the seismic intensity of each seismic event recorded in Hazar Lake was calculated. Here, we discuss the seismic threshold for earthquake records as well as the seismic recurrence pattern for the EAF over the last 3000 years. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 36 (0 ULiège)
See detailSedimentation influx and volcanic interactions in the Fuji Five Lakes: implications for paleoseismological records
Lamair, Laura ULiege; Hubert, Aurelia ULiege; Yamamoto, Shinya et al

Conference (2017, April 27)

The Fuji Fives Lakes are located at the foot of Mount Fuji volcano close to the triple junction, where the North American Plate, the Eurasian plate and the Philippine Sea Plate meet. These lakes are ... [more ▼]

The Fuji Fives Lakes are located at the foot of Mount Fuji volcano close to the triple junction, where the North American Plate, the Eurasian plate and the Philippine Sea Plate meet. These lakes are ideally situated to study Mount Fuji volcanism and the interaction between volcanism, changes in lake sedimentation rates and the ability of lakes to record paleoearthquakes. Here, we present newly acquired geological data of Lake Yamanaka and Lake Motosu, including seismic reflection profiles, gravity and piston cores. These two lakes and their respective watersheds were affected by several eruptions of Mount Fuji. Lake Yamanaka, a very shallow lake (max. depth 14 m), was heavily impacted by the scoria fall-out of the A.D. 1707 Hoei eruption of Mount Fuji. A detailed investigation of the effect of the Hoei eruption was conducted on short gravity cores, using high resolution XRD, C/N and 210Pb/137Cs analyses. The preliminary results suggest that the sedimentation rate of Lake Yamanaka drastically reduced after the Hoei eruption, followed by an increase until the present day. Similarly, lacustrine sedimentation in Lake Motosu (max. depth 122 m) was disturbed by Mount Fuji volcanism at a larger scale. The watershed of Lake Motosu was impacted by several lava flows and scoria cones. For example, the Omuro scoria cone reduced the catchment size of Lake Motosu and modified its physiography. The related scoria fall out covered an extensive part of the lake catchment and reduced terrigenous sedimentary influx to Lake Motosu. Within the deep basin of Lake Motosu, seismic reflection data shows two different periods that are distinguished by a major change in the dominant sedimentary processes. During the first period, sublacustrine landslides and turbidity currents were the dominant sedimentation processes. During the second one, the seismic stratigraphy evidences only deposition of numerous turbidites interrupting the hemipelagic sedimentation. Changes in sedimentary processes can be linked to the modification of the lake watershed by Mount Fuji volcanism, leading to a decrease in the sediment volume that can be remobilized, and therefore disappearance of large sublacustrine landslides. Turbidites are deposited due to surficial remobilization of lake slope sediments most probably as a result of earthquake shaking. When studying sedimentological records of lakes to define the paleoearthquake record, eruptions of nearby volcanoes should be taken into account. This study suggests that a large magnitude earthquake occurring few decades after a volcanic eruption (with large scale scoria fall-out), might not be recorded in a lake, or would only be fingerprinted in the sedimentary record by small turbiditic flows. References: Miyaji N., Kan'no A., Kanamaru T., Mannen K. 2011. High-resolution reconstruction of the Hoei eruption (AD 1707) of Fuji volcano, Japan. Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research 207, 113–129. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 14 (1 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailClay minerals behaviour in thin sandy clay-rich lacustrine turbidites (Lake Hazar, Turkey)
El Ouahabi, Meriam ULiege; Hubert, Aurelia ULiege; Lamair, Laura ULiege et al

Poster (2017, April 23)

Turbidites have been extensively studied in many different areas using cores or outcrop, which represent only an integrated snapshot of a dynamic evolving flow. Laboratory experiments provide the missing ... [more ▼]

Turbidites have been extensively studied in many different areas using cores or outcrop, which represent only an integrated snapshot of a dynamic evolving flow. Laboratory experiments provide the missing relationships between the flow characteristics and their deposits. In particular, flume experiments emphasize that the presence of clay plays a key role in turbidity current dynamics. Clay fraction, in small amount, provides cohesive strength to sediment mixtures and can damp turbulence. However, the degree of flocculation is dependent on factors such as the amount and size of clay particles, the surface of clay particles, chemistry and pH conditions in which the clay particles are dispersed. The present study focuses on thin clayey sand turbidites found in Lake Hazar (Turkey) occurring in stacked thin beds. Depositional processes and sources have been previously studied and three types were deciphered, including laminar flows dominated by cohesion, transitional, and turbulence flow regimes (Hage et al., in revision). For the purpose of determine the clay behavior in the three flow regimes, clay mineralogical, geochemical measurements on the cores allow characterising the turbidites. SEM observations provide further information regarding the morphology of clay minerals and other clasts. The study is particularly relevant given the highly alkaline and saline water of the Hazar Lake. Clay minerals in Hazar Lake sediments include kaolinite (1:1-type), illite and chlorite (2:1-type). Hazar lake water is alkaline having pH around 9.3, in such alkaline environment, a cation-exchange reaction takes place. Furthermore, in saline water (16‰), salts can act as a shield and decrease the repulsive forces between clay particle surfaces. So, pH and salt content jointly impact the behaviour of clays differently. Since the Al-faces of clay structures have a negative charge in basic solutions. At high pH, all kaolinite surfaces become negative-charged, and then kaolinite particles are dispersed, and the suspension is stabilized supported by our SEM observations. In alkaline water, kaolinite reveals a lower degree of consolidation. While, alkaline water has no measurable effect on illite and chlorite surface properties due to the absence of modifications in charge. Illite and chlorite form with other clasts clusters or aggregate structures in suspension when the particle interactions are dominated by attractive energies were formed. The aggregate structure plays a major part in the flow behavior of clay suspensions. Flocs will immobilize the suspending medium, and give rise to increasing viscosity and yield strength of the suspension. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 21 (0 ULiège)
See detailThe role of natural hazards and human activities on change of sedimentation patterns: The case of Lake Yamanaka (Fuji Five Lakes, Japan)
Lamair, Laura ULiege; Hubert, Aurelia ULiege; El Ouahabi, Meriam ULiege et al

Conference (2017, April 10)

The last eruption of Mt Fuji (Japan) occurred in A.D. 1707. The eruption lasted 16 days from 16 December 1707 to 1 January 1708 (Tsuya, 1955) and 1.8 km3 of volcanic materials were ejected in total ... [more ▼]

The last eruption of Mt Fuji (Japan) occurred in A.D. 1707. The eruption lasted 16 days from 16 December 1707 to 1 January 1708 (Tsuya, 1955) and 1.8 km3 of volcanic materials were ejected in total (Miyaji et al., 2011). Lake Yamanaka, a very shallow lake (max. 14. 3 m depth) located at the foot of the east-north-eastern flank of Mt Fuji, was heavily impacted by the eruption. A thick scoria layer entirely covered the catchment of Lake Yamanaka. The thickness of the deposit varies from 5 to 37 cm around Lake Yamanaka and reaches up to 149 cm at the south-west extremity of the catchment (Miyaji et al., 2011). In order to study the influence of Hoei eruption on Lake Yamanaka, 5 gravity cores were taken during the 2014 QuakeRecNankai campaign. The Hoei scoria was present at the bottom of the one core and in the core catcher of the four other cores. High resolution magnetic susceptibility, XRD, XRF, LOI, C/N and 210Pb/137Cs analyses were performed on the gravity cores. The results shows three distinct periods of sedimentation: (1) From Hoei eruption to A.D. 1900; (2) From A.D. 1900 to A.D. 1990; (3) From A.D. 1990 to A.D. 2014. The first period is characterized by a very low sedimentation rate (~0.07 cm/yr). During this period, the sediments of the catchment were trapped below the thick Hoei scoria layer. However, peaks of terrigenous input are recorded. We link such detrical signals with violent typhoons that hit the Fuji Five Lakes region. The water from the heavy rains percolated through the porous thick scoria layer and saturated it. As a result, surface runoffs carried the sediments from the catchment into Lake Yamanaka. The second period (from A.D. 1900 to A.D. 1990) is defined by an increase of the sedimentation rate (~0.16 cm/yr). The development of soil and the agriculture (e.g. pastureland, rice field, mulberry plantations) reduced the impact of Hoei scoria. The terrigenous inputs are higher than previously but remained more or less constant during this period of time. As the thickness of the scoria layer is partially reduced or covered by new soil, rains triggered by smaller typhoons could drain the sediments from watershed and transport them into the lake. The most recent period representing the last 27 years is characterized by a very high sedimentation rate (~1.036 cm/yr). The transition between period 2 and period 3 corresponds to the development of mass tourism and the urbanization around Lake Yamanaka. It is marked by an increasing of atmospheric pollution (Pb, Zn). In the upper part of the cores, a peak of 137Cs is observed. Such peak is related to cesium fall-out after Fukushima incident in 2011. In addition to the fingerprint of human impact, the lake also record a terrigenous signal related to the 2007 Fitow typhoon which provoked damage in the area. This study highlights the influence of eruptions and typhoons on the sedimentation of Lake Yamanaka. In the present day, the sedimentation recovery after a major eruption is accelerated by human activity. References: Miyaji N., Kan'no A., Kanamaru T., Mannen K. 2011. High-resolution reconstruction of the Hoei eruption (AD 1707) of Fuji volcano, Japan. Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research 207, 113–129. Tsuya, H. 1955. Geological and petrological studies of volcano, Fuji, V.: 5. on the 1707 eruption of Volcano Fuji. Bulletin of the Earthquake Research Institute 33, 341–383. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 47 (0 ULiège)
See detailA history of mass transport complexes related to eruptions and earthquake shaking: the case of Lake Motosu (Japan).
Lamair, Laura ULiege; Hubert, Aurelia ULiege; El Ouahabi, Meriam ULiege et al

Conference (2016, March 04)

The QuakeRecNankai project focuses on geological records of paleoearthquakes along the Nankai-Suruga subduction zone, south central Japan. In the framework of the project, we investigated the Fuji Five ... [more ▼]

The QuakeRecNankai project focuses on geological records of paleoearthquakes along the Nankai-Suruga subduction zone, south central Japan. In the framework of the project, we investigated the Fuji Five Lakes, located at the eastern end of the Nankai-Suruga Trough. Here, we present results from Lake Motosu, the deepest of the Fuji Five Lakes (max. depth 122 m), including seismic reflection profiles, gravity cores and preliminary results of 6.8 m long piston core. We identify mass transport deposits and turbidites possibly triggered by earthquakes. We study the lake sedimentary architecture and the Holocene sedimentation with a high resolution GEOPULSE pinger system. A seismic grid with total length of 39 km covered the lake. We identify a specific seismic horizon that may be related to the Aokigaraharamarubi lava flow (864 A.D.). Strong reflectors may also correlate with tephra layers from Oniwa-Okuniwa eruptions (620-790 A.D). In the western part of the lake, the seismic reflection profile reveals a change after the proposed Oniwa-Okuniwa eruptions in terms of volume and length of mass transport deposits. Large mass-transport deposits occurring before the eruptions are characterized by chaotic seismic facies. After the eruptions, the mass-transport deposits are much smaller and are characterized by transparent seismic facies attributed to turbiditic flow. Six gravity cores (max. 90cm long) provide samples of the lake bottom sediments. In these cores, turbidites and megaturbidites were identified based on facies analyses, combined with X-ray scanning, geophysical properties, grain-size analysis, mineralogy and XRF. During the period between the Oniwa-Okuniwa eruptions and the Aokigaraharamarubi lava flow (620-864 A.D), several lava flows occurred in the northern part of Mount Fuji and drastically modified the catchment of Lake Motosu. The decreasing of the size of catchment led to a decreasing of sedimentary yield in the lake. The change in the sedimentation rate could partly explain why we have a change in the type of mass transport deposit. Additionally, analyses were performed to define the minimum shaking intensity required to destabilize the slope. To assess slope stability, we investigated the clay content and the clay mineralogy of samples taken along the slope. In this presentation, we discuss the link between eruptions of Mount Fuji, decreasing of the size of the catchment, sedimentation rate and earthquake shaking. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 31 (1 ULiège)
See detailA history of mass transport complexes related to earthquake shaking: the case of Lake Motosu (Japan).
Lamair, Laura ULiege; Hubert, Aurelia ULiege; Boes, Evelien et al

Poster (2016, January 27)

The QuakeRecNankai project focuses on geological records of paleoearthquakes along the Nankai-Suruga subduction zone, south central Japan. In the framework of the project, we investigated the Fuji Five ... [more ▼]

The QuakeRecNankai project focuses on geological records of paleoearthquakes along the Nankai-Suruga subduction zone, south central Japan. In the framework of the project, we investigated the Fuji Five Lakes, located at the eastern end of the Nankai-Suruga Trough. Here, we present results from Lake Motosu, the deepest of the Fuji Five Lakes (max. depth 122 m), including seismic reflection profiles and gravity cores. We identify mass transport deposits and turbidites possibly triggered by earthquakes. We study the lake sedimentary architecture and the Holocene sedimentation with a very high resolution GEOPULSE pinger system. A seismic grid with total length of 39 km covered the lake. We identify a specific seismic horizon that may be related to the Aokigaraharamarubi lava flow (864 A.D.). Strong reflectors may also correlate with tephra layers from Oniwa-Okuniwa eruptions (620-790 A.D). In the western part of the lake, the seismic reflection profile reveals a change after the proposed Oniwa-Okuniwa eruptions in terms of volume and length of mass transport deposits. Large mass-transport deposits occurring before the eruptions are characterized by chaotic seismic facies. After the eruptions, the mass-transport deposits are much smaller than previously and characterized by transparent seismic facies attributed to a turbiditic flow. Six gravity cores (max. 90cm) provide samples of the lake bottom sediments. In these cores, turbidites were identified based on facies analyses, combined with X-ray scanning, geophysical properties, grain-size analysis, mineralogy and XRF. An age-depth model was established based on radionuclide dating. We compare the timing of sedimentary events in Lake Motosu with a historical catalogue of natural hazards in the Fuji Five Lakes area, including historical records of megathrust earthquakes rupturing the Nankai subduction zone, the Sagami Trough and other earthquakes occurring along inland faults. Several analyses were performed to understand why we have a change in type of mass transport deposit after the eruptions and to define the minimum shaking intensity required to destabilize the slope. To assess slope stability, we investigated the clay content and the clay mineralogy of the slope. Spatial statistics was also performed in order to evaluate the degree of the slope and the accumulation of sediment. We suggest that the presence of a scoria layer might have contributed to slope destabilization. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 32 (0 ULiège)
Full Text
See detailLate Holocene history of the Fuji Five Lakes (Japan)
Lamair, Laura ULiege; Hubert, Aurelia ULiege; Boes, Evelien et al

Conference (2015, July)

Detailed reference viewed: 26 (5 ULiège)
Full Text
See detailInvestigation of the Five Fuji Lakes and their potential of recording paleoearthquakes
Lamair, Laura ULiege; Hubert, Aurelia ULiege; Boes, Evelien et al

Conference (2015, March 04)

Detailed reference viewed: 24 (4 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailTien Shan geohazards database: Earthquakes and landslides
Havenith, Hans-Balder ULiege; Strom, Alexander; Torgoev, Isakbek et al

in Geomorphology (2015), 249

In this paper we present new and review already existing landslide and earthquake data for a large part of the Tien Shan, Central Asia. For the same area, only partial databases for sub-regions have been ... [more ▼]

In this paper we present new and review already existing landslide and earthquake data for a large part of the Tien Shan, Central Asia. For the same area, only partial databases for sub-regions have been presented previously. They were compiled and new data were added to fill the gaps between the databases. Major new inputs are products of the Central Asia Seismic Risk Initiative (CASRI): a tentative digital map of active faults (even with indication of characteristic or possible maximum magnitude) and the earthquake catalogue of Central Asia until 2009 that was now updated with USGS data (to May 2014). The new compiled landslide inventory contains existing records of 1600 previously mapped mass movements and more than 1800 new landslide data. Considering presently available seismo-tectonic and landslide data, a target region of 1200 km (E–W) by 600 km (N–S) was defined for the production of more or less continuous geohazards information. This target region includes the entire Kyrgyz Tien Shan, the South-Western Tien Shan in Tajikistan, the Fergana Basin (Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan and Uzbekistan) as well as the Western part in Uzbekistan, the North-Easternmost part in Kazakhstan and a small part of the Eastern Chinese Tien Shan (for the zones outside Kyrgyzstan and Tajikistan, only limited information was available and compiled)... [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 64 (3 ULiège)
Peer Reviewed
See detailUnderstanding of the diversity of earthquake turbiditic flows in a single lake: the case of the Lake Hazar on the East Anatolian Fault
Lamair, Laura ULiege; Hage, Sophie ULiege; Hubert, Aurelia ULiege et al

Poster (2014, August)

The East Anatolian Fault (EAF) is a major left-lateral strike-slip fault accommodating with the conjugate North Anatolian Fault the westward extrusion of the Anatolian Plate away from the Arabia-Eurasia ... [more ▼]

The East Anatolian Fault (EAF) is a major left-lateral strike-slip fault accommodating with the conjugate North Anatolian Fault the westward extrusion of the Anatolian Plate away from the Arabia-Eurasia collision zone. The East Anatolian Fault ruptured over most of its length during the 19th century in a series of magnitude ~7 earthquakes. During the 20th century this fault was less active with only two events of magnitude greater than 6. This absence of large earthquakes has resulted in relatively little attention being paid to the East Anatolian Fault compared to the North Anatolian Fault, which has ruptured during the last century in several earthquakes of Ms~7. To constrain the seismic history of the East Anatolian Fault in its central part, we focus on the Hazar Lake, occupying a 20 km long pull-apart basin. Short cores and long sedimentary cores were collected at three different sites to retrieve a paleoseismic record. Small correlative coarse-grained sedimentary events are identified in all cores. The age of the events is inferred combining radiocarbon and radionuclide (137 Cs and 210Pb) dating. We present here detailed analyses of three sedimentary events assigned respectively to the historical earthquakes occurring in 1789, 1513-1514, 1285. The source of the sedimentary events is different at the three sites. We combine X-ray imagery, magnetic susceptibility, grain-size and XRF measurements with thin section analysis to investigate the nature of sedimentary events. The analyses show first that the three sedimentary events are different. The magnitude of the terrigenous signal varies significantly. Second the correlative events have a different expression at the three sites. So each site has a different and specific sensitivity. In particular, an individual event can be composed of several coarse-grained sub-events of different magnitude with a time lapse in between greater than a week. The latter is reveals by the presence of bioturbation in particular by chironomids in individual thin sand layers. Thin section also shows that subevents are gradded. Each coarse-grained layer is thus a separated turbiditic flow. The site with the highest sensitivity is the one located near the near-shore steep submarine southern slopes overhanged by the steep subaerial slopes of the Hazar Mountains. The rivers draining the Hazar Mountains are ephemeral and provide a restricted sedimentary supply. In addition, seismic reflection data show that the submarine slopes do not to accumulate a significant sedimentary load. However on these steep slopes, an earthquake intensity of 6 or less is enough to trigger a slope failure and the associated turbiditic flow. We conclude that the different sub-events at this site may record a complete earthquake sequence, i.e the main-shock and its foreshocks and aftershocks. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 72 (7 ULiège)
Peer Reviewed
See detailHARBIYE AQUEDUCT: A RECORD OF PAST EARTHQUAKES
Lamair, Laura ULiege; Degée, Hervé ULiege; Hubert, Aurelia ULiege et al

Poster (2014, August)

This paper presents a detailed analysis of Harbiye aqueduct (Hatay, Turkey). The region is situated at the junction of two major faults (East Anatolian fault and the Dead Sea fault) and is well known for ... [more ▼]

This paper presents a detailed analysis of Harbiye aqueduct (Hatay, Turkey). The region is situated at the junction of two major faults (East Anatolian fault and the Dead Sea fault) and is well known for his important historic seismicity. The aqueduct is located close to Antioch on the Orontes (known as Antakya). The city was founded in the third century BC. Harbiye aqueduct is characterized by different stages of building (Benjelloun et al., submitted). A phase is dated to Caligula period. After the 37 AD earthquake, the aqueduct was rebuilt. We noticed the presence of two dissociated travertine and a changing of masonry material. We also observed several damages and repair structures dating from Roman time. We assume that our observations are the results of one or more earthquakes. Since the construction of the aqueduct, historical seismic records mention 13 earthquakes that provoked severe damages in the city of Antioch (Guidoboni et al. 1994, Al-Tarazi, 1999, Över et al. 2002). The last one occurred in 1872 (M=7.2). In order to test our hypothesis, we modelled the structure of the aqueduct by using FineLg, a software developed at University of Liege. The seismic signals were chosen in the European Strong-motion database (Ambraseys et al., 2002) according the following criteria: a bedrock station (to avoid site effect), a strike-slip fault mechanism and a distance between the station and the epicenter around 20-30 km. The aqueduct is located at about 25 km of the Dead Sea Fault. We tested several magnitudes for the purpose of estimate the magnitude of the earthquake(s) which destroy(s) the studied aqueduct. Our results highlight the bond between the magnitude, the damage and the weakness area of this type of structure. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 110 (5 ULiège)
Full Text
See detailThe Amik Lake in Southern Turkey over the last 4000 years, a new paleoseismological record of ruptures along the Northern Dead Sea Fault
Hubert, Aurelia ULiege; El Ouahabi, Meriam ULiege; Lebeau, Hèlène et al

Poster (2014, June 30)

The study focuses on the sedimentary record of the Amik Lake occupying the central part of a pull-apart basin. The Basin is crossed by The Dead Sea Fault (DSF), a major neotectonic structure in the Middle ... [more ▼]

The study focuses on the sedimentary record of the Amik Lake occupying the central part of a pull-apart basin. The Basin is crossed by The Dead Sea Fault (DSF), a major neotectonic structure in the Middle East extending from the Red Sea in the south to the East Anatolian Fault Zone in the north. Around the Amik Basin, continuous human occupation is attested since 6000-7000 BC. Indeed the low-lying Amuq plain is covered by tell settlements first explored by Robert Braidwood in the 1930s. Our objective in this presentation is to look at major paleo-environmental changes recorded in the Amik Lake over the last 4000 years and in particular its potential paleoseimic sedimentary record. The lake has been drained and progressively dried up since the mid-50s so that it is not watered during the summer season and constitutes a unique opportunity to collect sediment records. Sediments were collected at 1 cm to 2 cm intervals in a trench and in cores up to a depth of 5 meters in the clay deposits. A diverse array of complementary methods is applied to study the records: magnetic susceptibility, grain size, organic matter and inorganic carbon (L.O.I), XRD mineralogy, XRF geochemistry, carbon geochemistry and clay mineralogy. The age of the record is constrained combining radionuclide and radiocarbon dating. The sedimentary record shows large earthquake related structural disturbances and smaller siliciclastic sedimentary events. The siliciclastic input would be related to enhanced detritical sedimentation related to earthquake shaking. The latter is further investigated looking at intensities and shake maps related to the last 19th century M>7 earthquakes in the area and landslide prone area in the lake catchment. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 104 (9 ULiège)
See detailReview of the Newmark method predicting seismic slope displacements - the focus on the Arias Intensity amplification factor
Torgoev, Almazbek ULiege; Havenith, Hans-Balder ULiege; Lamair, Laura ULiege

in Proceedings of the International Symposium in Commemoration of the 2008 Wenchuan Earthquake (2013, May)

Detailed reference viewed: 29 (1 ULiège)