References of "Laloyaux, Cédric"
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See detailDo pictures of faces, and which ones, capture attention in the inattentional blindness paradigm?
Devue, Christel ULg; Laloyaux, Cédric ULg; Feyers, Dorothée ULg et al

in Perception (2009), 38(4), 552568

Faces and self-referential materials (eg the own name) are more likely to capture attention in the inattentional blindness (IB) paradigm than others stimuli. This effect is presumably due to the meaning ... [more ▼]

Faces and self-referential materials (eg the own name) are more likely to capture attention in the inattentional blindness (IB) paradigm than others stimuli. This effect is presumably due to the meaning of these stimuli rather than to their familiarity (Mack and Rock 1998). IB has mostly been investigated with schematic stimuli in previous work. In the present study, the generalisability of this finding was tested using photographic stimuli. In support to the view that faces constitute a special category of stimuli, it was found that pictures of faces resisted more to IB than pictures of common objects (Experiment 1) or than pictures of inverted faces (Experiment 2). In a third experiment, the influence of face familiarity and identity (ie the participant’s own face, a friend’s face and an unknown face) on IB rates was evaluated. Unexpectedly, no differential resistance to blindness across these three kinds of faces was found. In conclusion, picture of faces attracted attention more than pictures of objects or inverted faces in the IB paradigm. However, this effect was not dependent on face familiarity or identity. [less ▲]

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See detailTrouble obsessionnel-compulsif (TOC).
Debabeche, Cécile ULg; Muselle, Alice ULg; Servais, Sophie ULg et al

in Revue Médicale Suisse (2009), 5(214), 1659-62

Obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) is a frequent and disabling psychic illness. Along psychiatric history, several etiological models have been successively hypothesized to explain the obsessive ... [more ▼]

Obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) is a frequent and disabling psychic illness. Along psychiatric history, several etiological models have been successively hypothesized to explain the obsessive compulsive symptoms from a psychological, behavioural or biological point of view. This review aims at presenting OCD etiological models as well as describing OCD clinical and therapeutic aspects. [less ▲]

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See detailUndetected changes in visible stimuli influence subsequent decisions.
Laloyaux, Cédric ULg; Devue, Christel ULg; Doyen, Stéphane et al

in Consciousness & Cognition (2008), 17(3), 646-56

Change blindness-our inability to detect changes in a stimulus-occurs even when the change takes place gradually, without any disruption [Simons, D. J., Franconeri, S. L., & Reimer, R. L. (2000). Change ... [more ▼]

Change blindness-our inability to detect changes in a stimulus-occurs even when the change takes place gradually, without any disruption [Simons, D. J., Franconeri, S. L., & Reimer, R. L. (2000). Change blindness in the absence of a visual disruption. Perception, 29(10), 1143-1154]. Such gradual changes are more difficult to detect than changes that involve a disruption. Using this method, David et al. [David, E., Laloyaux, C., Devue, C., & Cleeremans, A. (in press). Change blindness to gradual changes in facial expressions. Psychologica Belgica] recently showed substantial blindness to changes that involve facial expressions of emotion. In this experiment, we show that people who failed to detect any change in the displays were (1) nevertheless influenced by the changing information in subsequent recognition decisions about which facial expression they had seen, and (2) that their confidence in their decisions was lower after exposure to changing vs. static displays. The findings therefore support the notion that undetected changes that occur in highly salient stimuli may be causally efficacious and influence subsequent behavior. Implications concerning the nature of the representations associated with undetected changes are discussed. [less ▲]

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See detailSelf-face does not capture attention: an inattentional blindness study
Devue, Christel ULg; Laloyaux, Cédric ULg; Feyers, Dorothée ULg et al

Poster (2006)

It has been shown previously that some categories of stimuli are more likely to capture attention under condition of inattention compared to others. This is the case of faces and auto-referential material ... [more ▼]

It has been shown previously that some categories of stimuli are more likely to capture attention under condition of inattention compared to others. This is the case of faces and auto-referential material (e.g., the subject’s own name) in the inattentional blindness paradigm (Mack & Rock, 1998). However, stimuli combining these two properties have never been assessed. Yet it could be that the own face, because it is both a face and a self-referential stimulus, is more prone to attract attention compared to other faces. On the contrary, it could be that the identity and the familiarity of faces are not relevant factors because any face attracts attention by itself and all faces are equally distractive. Moreover, most of previous studies have used schematic unrealistic stimuli. Here, we tested these two opposite hypotheses in a first experiment using photographic stimuli and results showed that the own face does not attract attention compared to another highly familiar face or to an unknown face. Nevertheless, it appears that the own face was still better recognized compared to the others. A second experiment was aimed at verifying whether faces attract attention more than other objects with the same realistic photographic stimuli than used in experiment 1. Results confirmed previous findings that faces are more resistant to inattentional blindness than other objects. Our study suggests that a face by itself attracts attention compared to other objects whatever its familiarity or its identity. These results challenge the view that auto-referential material benefits from specific attentional processes. [less ▲]

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See detailChange blindness to gradual changes in facial expressions
Laloyaux, Cédric ULg; Devue, Christel ULg; David, Elodie et al

Poster (2006)

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See detailChange blindness to gradual changes in facial expressions
David, E.; Laloyaux, Cédric ULg; Devue, Christel ULg et al

in Psychologica Belgica (2006), 46(4), 253-268

Change blindness—our inability to detect changes in a stimulus—occurs even when the change takes place gradually, without disruption (Simons et al., 2000). Such gradual changes are more difficult to ... [more ▼]

Change blindness—our inability to detect changes in a stimulus—occurs even when the change takes place gradually, without disruption (Simons et al., 2000). Such gradual changes are more difficult to detect than changes that involve a disruption. In this experiment, we extend previous findings to the domain of facial expressions of emotions occurring in the context of a realistic scene. Even with changes occurring in central, highly relevant stimuli such as faces, gradual changes still produced high levels of change blindness: Detection rates were three times lower for gradual changes than for displays involving disruption, with only 15% of the observers perceiving the gradual change within a single trial. However, despite this high rate of change blindness, changes on faces were significantly better detected than color changes occurring on non facial objects in the same scene. [less ▲]

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