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See detailPhotosynthesis-dependent isoprene emission from leaf to planet in a global carbon-chemistry-climate model
Unger, N.; Harper, K.; Zheng, Y. et al

in Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (2013), 13

We describe the implementation of a biochemical model of isoprene emission that depends on the electron requirement for isoprene synthesis into the Farquhar–Ball–Berry leaf model of photosynthesis and ... [more ▼]

We describe the implementation of a biochemical model of isoprene emission that depends on the electron requirement for isoprene synthesis into the Farquhar–Ball–Berry leaf model of photosynthesis and stomatal conductance that is embedded within a global chemistry-climate simulation framework. The isoprene production is calculated as a function of electron transport-limited photosynthesis, intercellular and atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration, and canopy temperature. The vegetation biophysics module computes the photosynthetic uptake of carbon dioxide coupled with the transpiration of water vapor and the isoprene emission rate at the 30 min physical integration time step of the global chemistry-climate model. In the model, the rate of carbon assimilation provides the dominant control on isoprene emission variability over canopy temperature. A control simulation representative of the present-day climatic state that uses 8 plant functional types (PFTs), prescribed phenology and generic PFT-specific isoprene emission potentials (fraction of electrons available for isoprene synthesis) reproduces 50% of the variability across different ecosystems and seasons in a global database of 28 measured campaign-average fluxes. Compared to time-varying isoprene flux measurements at 9 select sites, the model authentically captures the observed variability in the 30 min average diurnal cycle (R2 = 64–96 %) and simulates the flux magnitude to within a factor of 2. The control run yields a global isoprene source strength of 451 TgC yr−1 that increases by 30% in the artificial absence of plant water stress and by 55% for potential natural vegetation. [less ▲]

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See detailImpact of diffuse light on isoprene and monoterpene emissions from a mixed temperate forest
Laffineur, Quentin ULg; Aubinet, Marc ULg; Schoon, Niels et al

in Atmospheric Environment (2013), 46(74), 385-392

This study investigated the impact of diffuse light on canopy scale emission of isoprene and monoterpenes measured continuously above a mixed temperate forest, using the disjunct eddy-covariance by mass ... [more ▼]

This study investigated the impact of diffuse light on canopy scale emission of isoprene and monoterpenes measured continuously above a mixed temperate forest, using the disjunct eddy-covariance by mass scanning technique with a proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometer (PTR-MS) instrument. To assess this impact, the relationship between emissions/radiation and emissions/gross primary production (GPP) under clear sky and cloudy conditions were analysed. Under cloudy conditions (high proportion of diffuse radiation), the isoprene and monoterpene fluxes were enhanced compared to clear sky conditions (low proportion of diffuse radiation) at equivalent temperature and above-canopy total radiation. The whole-canopy enzymatic activity of the metabolic isoprene production pathway, however, was suggested to be lower under cloudy conditions than under clear sky conditions at equivalent temperature. The mechanisms behind these observations are probably linked to the better penetration of diffuse radiation in the canopy. Shade leaves/needles receive more radiation in cloudy conditions than in clear sky conditions, thereby inducing the observed effects. [less ▲]

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See detailLong-term study of biogenic volatile organic compound exchanges in a forest ecosystem
Laffineur, Quentin ULg

Doctoral thesis (2012)

The terrestrial biosphere, especially forest ecosystems, emits large quantities of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) which have a significant impact on the atmosphere’s chemical and physical ... [more ▼]

The terrestrial biosphere, especially forest ecosystems, emits large quantities of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) which have a significant impact on the atmosphere’s chemical and physical characteristics. In particular, VOCs are precursors in the formation of ozone and sec-ondary organic aerosols. Isoprene and monoterpenes dominate the total VOC emissions, and methanol is one of the most abundant atmospheric VOCs due to its longer half-life than the other two. The main objective of this thesis was to investigate (using the eddy covariance technique and a proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometer) the mechanisms of VOC (isoprene, monoterpene and methanol) emission and/or deposition at the scale of a temperate climate forest ecosystem (Vielsalm, Belgium) comprising several species (Fagus sylvatica, Abies alba, Picea Abies and Pseudotsuga menziessi). The eddy covariance technique is very suitable for studying VOC emission/deposition mechanisms at ecosystem level as it does not interfere with the functioning of the ecosystem and it has very good temporal resolution (half an hour). It was used for several months at the Vielsalm site without any major interruption to the measurements. The first measurement period ran from early July to late November 2009 and the second from late March to late November 2010. As well as measuring the VOC exchanges by eddy covari-ance, the climate parameters controlling the exchange mechanisms were also measured. During both these periods the methanol, acetaldehyde, acetone, isoprene, methyl vinyl ke-tone/methacrolein, monoterpene, acetic acid (2010) and formic acid (2010) fluxes were meas-ured. The highest emission levels observed were isoprene and monoterpenes along with methanol, which unlike the first two also showed depositions. The thesis therefore naturally focused on studying these three fluxes, in view of the important role played by these three compounds in atmospheric chemistry and hence the scientific community’s interest in refining the parametrisation of these compounds’ ecosystem/atmosphere exchange models. The study of the isoprene, monoterpene and methanol fluxes has been written up in three original articles which form the main body of this thesis. Because of the heterogeneity of the ecosystem studied, the first essential study concerned the identification of VOC-emitting species. This was done with the aid of a flux footprint model combined with a map of the species occurring on the site. This analysis showed that the main monoterpene emitter was Fagus sylvatica followed, to a lesser extent, by Abies alba, Picea Abies and Pseudotsuga menziessi. In contrast to the literature, the analysis showed Abies alba to be a probable isoprene emitter but the presence of Picea Abies, a known isoprene emitter, ruled out absolute certainty on that point. The isoprene fluxes were observed by day only, unlike the monoterpene fluxes which were observed both day and night. Diurnal flux analysis clearly showed temperature and light to be the two main variables controlling emissions. Combining this analysis with a study of the close relationship between isoprene/monoterpene emissions and photosynthesis revealed the plants’ de novo biosynthetic production mechanisms, an original aspect at ecosystem scale. From the occurrence of nocturnal monoterpene emissions it was possible to determine that de novo monoterpene production emitted directly into the atmosphere (as in the case of isoprene) was not the only source of the emissions observed. Withdrawals from monoterpene sinks located in plant organs or in the soil can also be monoterpene sources. Studying the relationship between isoprene/monoterpene fluxes and light, distinguishing between cloudy and sunny conditions, showed that for the same light intensity the emissions were higher in cloudy con-ditions than in sunshine. Similarly, a study of the relationship between isoprene fluxes and photosynthesis in cloudy/sunny conditions suggested that de novo isoprene production is greater in leaves above the canopy than in leaves within the canopy. Long-term measurement of isoprene and monoterpene emissions enabled seasonal changes in the mechanisms observed to be studied and more fully understood. As well as providing an understanding of the mechanisms, this research also resulted in quantification of the seasonal changes in the key parameters for modelling isoprene/monoterpene emissions. Methanol exchanges were generally positive (emissions) by day and negative (depositions) at night. Overall, methanol depositions were predominant in summer and autumn but in the mi-nority in spring. On average, the Vielsalm site behaved like a methanol sink, which contradicts all the other research published to date. An original model was developed for identifying the mechanisms responsible for short-term and long-term methanol emissions/depositions. The consistency between the measurements and the model simulations suggested that the main processes controlling methanol exchanges in summer could be attributed, in the short term, to (water-soluble) methanol adsorption/desorption occurring in the films of water on leaf surfaces and/or on the soil surface and, in the long term, to methanol destruction by a biological and/or chemical degradation process also occurring on the surface of leaves and/or the soil. A study of the difference between the measurements and the model, in spring, indicated the possibility of biosynthetic methanol production by the plants. This production was apparently controlled mainly by temperature, but it could not be shown in summer when methanol adsorption/desorption processes dominated. The literature on ecosystem-atmosphere exchanges of isoprene, monoterpenes and, to a lesser extent, methanol is extensive. Nevertheless, what makes this research original is the spatio-temporal scale used. We are in fact working at ecosystem scale, and not at leaf or branch scale as in most other cases. Moreover, our measurements cover a timescale from half an hour to a full growing season, which is rarely found in the literature. This has resulted in a better under-standing of these compounds’ production and exchange mechanisms. To be precise, the methanol flux study is currently unique in its description and understanding of the deposition mechanisms. [less ▲]

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See detailAbiotic and biotic control of methanol exchanges in a temperate mixed forest
Laffineur, Quentin ULg; Aubinet, Marc ULg; Schoon, N. et al

in Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (2012), 12

Methanol exchanges over a mixed temperate forest in the Belgian Ardennes were measured for more than one vegetation season using disjunct eddy-covariance by a mass scanning technique and Proton Transfer ... [more ▼]

Methanol exchanges over a mixed temperate forest in the Belgian Ardennes were measured for more than one vegetation season using disjunct eddy-covariance by a mass scanning technique and Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS). Half-hourly methanol fluxes were measured in the range of −0.6 μgm−2 s−1 to 0.6 μgm−2 s−1, and net daily methanol fluxes were generally negative in summer and autumn and positive in spring. On average, the negative fluxes dominated (i.e. the site behaved as a net sink), in contrast to what had been found in previous studies. An original model describing the adsorption/desorption of methanol in water films present in the forest ecosystem and the methanol degradation process was developed. Its calibration, based on field measurements, predicted a mean methanol degradation rate of −0.0074 μgm−2 s−1 and a half lifetime for methanol in water films of 57.4 h. Biogenic emissions dominated the exchange only in spring, with a standard emission factor of 0.76 μgm−2 s−1. The great ability of the model to reproduce the long-term evolution, as well as the diurnal variation of the fluxes, suggests that the adsorption/desorption and degradation processes play an important role in the global methanol budget. This result underlines the need to conduct long-term measurements in order to accurately capture these processes and to better estimate methanol fluxes at the ecosystem scale. [less ▲]

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See detailChapter 5: Night time Flux correction
Aubinet, Marc ULg; Feigenwinter, Christian; Heinesch, Bernard ULg et al

in Aubinet, Marc; Vesala, Timo; Papale, Dario (Eds.) Eddy Covariance: A Practical Guide to Measurement and Data Analysis (2012)

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See detailClear link between drought stress, photosynthesis and biogenic volatile organic compounds in Fagus sylvatica L.
Šimpraga, M.; Verbeeck, H.; Demarcke, M. et al

in Atmospheric Environment (2011), 45(30), 5254-5259

Direct plant stress sensing is the key for a quantitative understanding of drought stress effects on biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) emissions. A given level of drought stress might have a ... [more ▼]

Direct plant stress sensing is the key for a quantitative understanding of drought stress effects on biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) emissions. A given level of drought stress might have a fundamentally different effect on the BVOC emissions of different plants. For the first time, we continuously quantified the level of drought stress in a young potted beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) with a linear variable displacement transducer (LVDT) installed at stem level in combination with simultaneous measurements of BVOC emissions and photosynthesis rates at leaf level. This continuous set of measurements allowed us to examine how beech alters its pattern of photosynthesis and carbon allocation to BVOC emissions (mainly monoterpenes, MTs) and radial stem growth during the development of drought stress. We observed an increasing-decreasing trend in the MT emissions as well as in the fraction of assimilated carbon re-emitted back into the atmosphere (ranging between 0.14 and 0.01%). We were able to link these dynamics to pronounced changes in radial stem growth, which served as a direct plant stress indicator. Interestingly, we detected a sudden burst in emission of a non-identified, non-MT BVOC species when drought stress was acute (i.e. pronounced negative stem growth). This burst might have been caused by a certain stress-related green leaf volatile, which disappeared immediately upon re-watering and thus the alleviation of drought stress. These results highlight that direct plant stress sensing creates opportunities to understand the overall complexity of stress-related BVOC emissions. [less ▲]

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See detailIsoprene and monoterpene emissions from a mixed temperate forest
Laffineur, Quentin ULg; Heinesch, Bernard ULg; Amelynck, Crist et al

Poster (2011, April 07)

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See detailMeasurement and modeling of methanol deposition/emission in a mixed forest
Laffineur, Quentin ULg; Heinesch, Bernard ULg; Amelynck, Crist et al

in Geophysical Research Abstracts (2011, April 07), 13

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See detailFINAL REPORT PHASE II "Impact of Phenology and Environmental Conditions on BVOC Emissions from Forest Ecosystems" "IMPECVOC"
Dewulf, Jo; Joó, Eva; Van Langenhove, Herman et al

Report (2011)

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See detailEffect of seasonality and short-term light and temperature history on monoterpene emissions from European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.)
Demarcke, M.; Amelynck, Crist; Schoon, N. et al

in Hansel, Armin; Dunkl, Jürgen (Eds.) 5th International PTR-MS Conference on Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometry and its Applications (2011, January)

Branch enclosure measurements of monoterpene emision rates have been performed at different positions in the canopy of a European beech tree in natural environmental conditions. Strong and position ... [more ▼]

Branch enclosure measurements of monoterpene emision rates have been performed at different positions in the canopy of a European beech tree in natural environmental conditions. Strong and position-dependent standard emission rate variations were observed in the course of the growth season. By using the obtained dataset and a modified vesrion of the MEGAN algorithm, the response of the emissions to short-term light and temperature history was investigated [less ▲]

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See detailWhat can we learn from year-round BVOC disjunct eddycovariance measurements? A case example from a temperate forest
Laffineur, Quentin ULg; Heinesch, Bernard ULg; Schoon, N. et al

in Hansel, Armin; Dunkl, Jürgen (Eds.) 5th International PTR-MS Conference on Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometry and its Applications (2011, January)

Long term ecosystem-scale biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC) flux measurements by disjunct eddy-covariance are needed to determine and characterize the BVOC emissions/depositions from episodic ... [more ▼]

Long term ecosystem-scale biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC) flux measurements by disjunct eddy-covariance are needed to determine and characterize the BVOC emissions/depositions from episodic events (budburst, stress) as well as the continuous emission/deposition during vegetation growth and its seasonal evolution in interaction with climate and environment. If the data coverage is sufficient, this technique has the potential to provide a dataset covering the whole spectrum of meteorological and phenological conditions encountered by the studied ecosystem ending in a statistically more robust dataset than what can be provided by other BVOC measurement techniques. In addition, long term measurements allow in Oxygenated VOCs (OVOCs) depositions to be estimated in a realistic manner with is not the case with the enclosure technique. Here we present a year-round campaign of disjunct eddy-covariance BVOC fluxes above a mixed temperate forest performed in the frame of the IMPECVOC (Impact of Phenology and Environmental Conditions on BVOC Emissions from Forest Ecosystems) project. We will analyse the three main BVOC species (isoprene/monoterpenes and methanol) in order to illustrate the interest of long-term flux measurements by investigating the main driving variables and the underlying mechanisms of emission/deposition, how de novo carbon allocation to the isoprene/monoterpenes skeleton structure is altered through the time. For methanol, we will show the importance of deposition on a long-term basis and use an empirical model to discriminate the physical and physiological components of the exchange. [less ▲]

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See detailFirst space-based derivation of the global atmospheric methanol emission fluxes
Stavrakou, T.; Guenther, A.; Razavi, A. et al

in Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (2011), 11

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See detailIsoprene and monoterpene emissions from a mixed temperate forest
Laffineur, Quentin ULg; Aubinet, Marc ULg; Schoon, N. et al

in Atmospheric Environment (2011), 45

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See detailFlux de Composés Organiques Volatils (COV) au-dessus d'une forêt belge: De la mesure par eddy covariance à la recherche des mécanismes d'émission et de déposition.
Laffineur, Quentin ULg

Scientific conference (2010, September 16)

Les écosystèmes forestiers à l'échelle globale sont les principaux émetteurs de COV (Composés Organiques Volatils). La quantité de COV émise et leur haute réactivité avec les principaux oxydants de l ... [more ▼]

Les écosystèmes forestiers à l'échelle globale sont les principaux émetteurs de COV (Composés Organiques Volatils). La quantité de COV émise et leur haute réactivité avec les principaux oxydants de l'atmosphère contribuent de manière non négligeable à la chimie de l'atmosphère (ozone). Dans le cadre d'un projet fédéral belge, des mesures continues de flux de COV par eddy-covariance au moyen d'un PTR-MS sont réalisées sur le site forestier de Vielsalm. Une première campagne de mesures a été effectuée pendant la période Juillet-Octobre 2009 et une seconde campagne a débutée au mois de Mars 2010. Les émissions les plus importantes observées ont été celles de l'isoprène, des monoterpènes et du méthanol. Des dépositions importantes de méthanol ont également été observées. L'exposé présentera ces mesures et leur exploitation avec pour objectif principal d'étudier la variabilité saisonnière des flux de COVs en relation avec leurs principales variables de contrôle. Les mécanismes potentiellement responsables de cette variabilité seront discutés. [less ▲]

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See detailVOC emissions from a temperate mixed forest in Belgium measured by eddy-covariance
Laffineur, Quentin ULg; Heinesch, Bernard ULg; Aubinet, Marc ULg et al

Poster (2010, May)

Forest ecosystems are known to be important emitters of Biogenic Volatile Organic Compounds (BVOC). They play an important role in the atmospheric chemistry and may contribute to the formation of ozone ... [more ▼]

Forest ecosystems are known to be important emitters of Biogenic Volatile Organic Compounds (BVOC). They play an important role in the atmospheric chemistry and may contribute to the formation of ozone and aerosols with consequences on air quality and on climate. In order to better understand the effects of environmental parameters on the emissions, micrometeorological flux measurements were carried out above a mixed forest (Fagus sylvatica, Pseudotsuga menziesii, Abies alba, Picea abies) at the Vielsalm experimental site (Belgium) from July to November 2009. The flux measurements were obtained by the eddy-covariance technique using proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry. In our first measurement campaign, among other VOC compounds, isoprene (m/z 69) and monoterpenoid compounds (m/z 137) have been measured continuously with a data coverage of 75 and 58 % respectively, allowing robust statistical analysis. In our analysis, we focused on these two main emissions. A footprint analysis showed that Fagus sylvatica seems to be the main emitter of m/z 137 and Abies alba seems to be the main emitter of m/z 69. BVOCs fluxes present an exponential response to temperature. This response is more pronounced for m/z 69 while it shows the strongest seasonal evolution for m/z 137. A light dependence of m/z 69 and m/z 137 fluxes was observed but the relationship did not exhibit the same behaviour before (hyperbolic relation) and after midday (linear relation). This behaviour difference induced a hysteresis effect on the daily evolution of averaged fluxes. A robust local minimum was also observed just before midday for m/z 69 (less obvious for m/z 137) during July-August period. This minimum is not observed in the CO2 fluxes which are also measured in Vielsalm. The light dependence of BVOC emissions suggests that m/z 69 and m/z 137 emissions are directly linked to the photosynthetic cycle but the presence of the midday local minimum suggests that other processes influence the measured BVOC fluxes. As for the relation with air temperature, a seasonal evolution of flux-light dependence was far more evident for m/z 137 than for m/z 69. This seasonal variation could be explained by a phenological effect. As Fagus sylvatica is the main m/z 137 emitter, its flux is probably influenced by leaves ageing while m/z 69, as mainly emitted by Abies alba, is less influenced by needles ageing. A wind speed dependence of BVOCs fluxes was also observed, the flux increasing linearly with wind speed. This surprising result will be discussed. [less ▲]

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See detailANNUAL SCIENTIFIC REPORT PHASE II "Impact of Phenology and Environmental Conditions on BVOC Emissions from Forest Ecosystems" "IMPECVOC"
Dewulf, Jo; Joó, Eva; Steppe, Kathy et al

Report (2009)

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See detailUncertainty of carbon dioxide fluxes introduced by different high-pass filtering methods
Ibrom, Andreas; Geißler, Simon; Laffineur, Quentin ULg et al

Conference (2009)

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See detailAn analysis of the random error affecting CO2 fluxes measured by eddy covariance
Laffineur, Quentin ULg; Heinesch, Bernard ULg; Aubinet, Marc ULg

Poster (2009)

This study focuses on random errors associated with eddy covariance flux measurements. This error is heteroscedastic, increases linearly with the flux magnitude and the error on CO2 flux decreases with ... [more ▼]

This study focuses on random errors associated with eddy covariance flux measurements. This error is heteroscedastic, increases linearly with the flux magnitude and the error on CO2 flux decreases with increasing wind speed. As random errors accumulate in quadrature, they are less critical than systematic errors as far as flux sums are concerned. On the other hand it may affect significantly half-hour data and pose problem for modelling or analysis of flux response to environmental parameters. It is therefore useful to characterize the site and the specific conditions under which the random error is the most important. The random error on CO2 flux was computed at two sites, one cropland and one forested site, by using the daily differencing approach (DDA, Hollinger and Richardson 2005). Relationships with flux and wind speed were compared between different periods (day vs. night, growing season vs. rest of the year) and for different flux computation methods. First, an increase of random error with decreasing wind speed was observed at low speed. This effect was not observed during the rest period at the cropland site and disappears when a high-pass filtering is applied to the data. It may be explained by two processes: on one hand, the below canopy air layer is less efficiently mixed which can create large flux variations when CO2 sources and sinks are separated. On the other hand, mesoscale motions may exceed small-scale turbulence at low wind speed. At similar wind speeds, the random error was lower at the cropland than at the forested site, which can be due to either process: indeed, at the cropland site, the distance between CO2 sources and sinks is smaller which reduce the low mixing effect but the site is also more flat and homogeneous which reduce the impact of mesoscale movements. The possibility of mesoscale movement impact is supported by the fact that the effect disappears when applying a high pass filtering. The random error was also found sensitive to the computational method: in particular it is larger when the flux is computed using the block average rather than the running mean, it increases when storage is taken into account and decreases when data are filtered by applying stationarity screening or u* filtering. [less ▲]

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See detailAn analysis of the random error affecting CO2 fluxes measured by eddy covariance.
Laffineur, Quentin ULg; Heinesch, Bernard ULg; Aubinet, Marc ULg

Poster (2009)

This study focuses on random errors associated with eddy covariance flux measurements. This error is heteroscedastic, increases linearly with the flux magnitude and the error on CO2 flux decreases with ... [more ▼]

This study focuses on random errors associated with eddy covariance flux measurements. This error is heteroscedastic, increases linearly with the flux magnitude and the error on CO2 flux decreases with increasing wind speed. As random errors accumulate in quadrature, they are less critical than systematic errors as far as flux sums are concerned. On the other hand it may affect significantly half-hour data and pose problem for modelling or analysis of flux response to environmental parameters. It is therefore useful to characterize the site and the specific conditions under which the random error is the most important. The random error on CO2 flux was computed at two sites, one cropland and one forested site, by using the daily differencing approach (DDA, Hollinger and Richardson 2005). Relationships with flux and wind speed were compared between different periods (day vs. night, growing season vs. rest of the year) and for different flux computation methods. First, an increase of random error with decreasing wind speed was observed at low speed. This effect was not observed during the rest period at the cropland site and disappears when a high-pass filtering is applied to the data. It may be explained by two processes: on one hand, the below canopy air layer is less efficiently mixed which can create large flux variations when CO2 sources and sinks are separated. On the other hand, mesoscale motions may exceed small-scale turbulence at low wind speed. At similar wind speeds, the random error was lower at the cropland than at the forested site, which can be due to either process: indeed, at the cropland site, the distance between CO2 sources and sinks is smaller which reduce the low mixing effect but the site is also more flat and homogeneous which reduce the impact of mesoscale movements. The possibility of mesoscale movement impact is supported by the fact that the effect disappears when applying a high pass filtering. The random error was also found sensitive to the computational method: in particular it is larger when the flux is computed using the block average rather than the running mean, it increases when storage is taken into account and decreases when data are filtered by applying stationarity screening or u* filtering. [less ▲]

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