References of "LEJEUNE, Eric"
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See detailStrontium Ranelate: A New Treatment for Postmenopausal Osteoporosis with a Dual Mode of Action
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Sarlet, Nathalie ULg; LEJEUNE, Eric ULg et al

in Current Osteoporosis Reports (2005), 3(1), 30-4

In vitro, strontium ranelate increases collagen and noncollagen protein synthesis by mature osteoblast-enriched cells. Its effects on bone formation were confirmed as the drug enhanced preosteoblastic ... [more ▼]

In vitro, strontium ranelate increases collagen and noncollagen protein synthesis by mature osteoblast-enriched cells. Its effects on bone formation were confirmed as the drug enhanced preosteoblastic cell replication. In the isolated osteoclast, preincubation of bone slices with strontium ranelate-induced dose-dependent inhibition of the bone-resorbing activity of treated rat osteoclast. Strontium ranelate dose-dependently inhibited preosteoclast differentiation. Its effect in postmenopausal women with established osteoporosis was assessed during an international, prospective, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled phase 3 program comparing strontium ranelate 2 g daily with placebo. The 3-year analysis of the phase 3 study, Spinal Osteoporosis Therapeutic Intervention, evaluating the effect of strontium ranelate 2 g/day on vertebral fracture rates, revealed a significant 41% reduction in the relative risk of patients experiencing new vertebral fracture with strontium ranelate over 3 years. A second phase 3 study showed a significant reduction in the relative risk of experiencing a nonvertebral fracture in the group treated with strontium ranelate over 3 years. These results show that strontium ranelate is a new, effective, and safe treatment for vertebral and hip osteoporosis, with a unique mode of action, increasing bone formation and decreasing bone resorption leading to a rebalance of bone turnover in favor of bone formation. [less ▲]

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See detailLong-term effects of glucosamine sulphate on osteoarthritis progression: a randomised, placebo-controlled clinical trial
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Deroisy, Rita ULg; Rovati, Lucio C et al

in Lancet (2001), 357

BACKGROUND: Treatment of osteoarthritis is usually limited to short-term symptom control. We assessed the effects of the specific drug glucosamine sulphate on the long-term progression of osteoarthritis ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Treatment of osteoarthritis is usually limited to short-term symptom control. We assessed the effects of the specific drug glucosamine sulphate on the long-term progression of osteoarthritis joint structure changes and symptoms. METHODS: We did a randomised, double-blind placebo controlled trial, in which 212 patients with knee osteoarthritis were randomly assigned 1500 mg sulphate oral glucosamine or placebo once daily for 3 years. Weightbearing, anteroposterior radiographs of each knee in full extension were taken at enrolment and after 1 and 3 years. Mean joint-space width of the medial compartment of the tibiofemoral joint was assessed by digital image analysis, whereas minimum joint-space width--ie, at the narrowest point--was measured by visual inspection with a magnifying lens. Symptoms were scored by the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities (WOMAC) osteoarthritis index. FINDINGS: The 106 patients on placebo had a progressive joint-space narrowing, with a mean joint-space loss after 3 years of -0.31 mm (95% CI -0.48 to -0.13). There was no significant joint-space loss in the 106 patients on glucosamine sulphate: -0.06 mm (-0.22 to 0.09). Similar results were reported with minimum joint-space narrowing. As assessed by WOMAC scores, symptoms worsened slightly in patients on placebo compared with the improvement observed after treatment with glucosamine sulphate. There were no differences in safety or reasons for early withdrawal between the treatment and placebo groups. INTERPRETATION: The long-term combined structure-modifying and symptom-modifying effects of gluosamine sulphate suggest that it could be a disease modifying agent in osteoarthritis. [less ▲]

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