References of "L'Estrange, Elizabeth"
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See detailMedieval Genders and Sexualities in Europe: Construction, Transformation, and Subversion, 600–1530
L'Estrange, Elizabeth ULg; More, Alison

Book published by Ashgate (2011)

With a specific focus on the themes of construction, subversion and transformation, this collection of essays makes an innovative contribution to the study of genders and sexual identity in the Middle ... [more ▼]

With a specific focus on the themes of construction, subversion and transformation, this collection of essays makes an innovative contribution to the study of genders and sexual identity in the Middle Ages. Scholars from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds deal with the presentation or transformation of gender, third-gender, and the relationship between gender and sexual identity in fields such as literature, hagiography, and art history, from the Anglo-Saxon period to the early sixteenth century. The contributors offer in-depth analyses on specific subjects—including French romance literature, saints’ vitae, Italian visual cultures, and manuscript studies—as well as providing food for thought for scholars outside medieval studies who are interested in the themes of gender transformation and presentation. Engaging with current academic debates over the complexities and pluralities of gender identity in the Middle Ages, this volume is one of the first collections to show how the themes of gender construction and transformation can be applied over a wide range of fields. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 68 (16 ULg)
See detailGender Relations in Fifteenth-Century Italian Households
L'Estrange, Elizabeth ULg

in L'Estrange, Elizabeth (Ed.) Representing Medieval Genders and Sexualities in Europe: Construction, Transformation, and Subversion 600-1530 (2011)

Detailed reference viewed: 33 (7 ULg)
See detailArtistic Representations
L'Estrange, Elizabeth ULg; Borland, Jennifer; Bleeke, Marian et al

in Phillips, Kim (Ed.) A Cultural History of Women in the Medieval Era (2011)

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See detailPenitence, Motherhood and Passion Devotion: Contextualising Anne of Brittany's Prayer Book, Chicago, Newberry Library, MS 83
L'Estrange, Elizabeth ULg

in Brown, Cynthia (Ed.) The Cultural and Political Legacy of Anne de Bretagne: Negotiating Convention in Books and Documents (2010)

Anne of Brittany’s prayer book, conserved in the Newberry Library in Chicago, has been somewhat neglected in discussions of Anne’s manuscripts. This may be because it has been eclipsed by those other, far ... [more ▼]

Anne of Brittany’s prayer book, conserved in the Newberry Library in Chicago, has been somewhat neglected in discussions of Anne’s manuscripts. This may be because it has been eclipsed by those other, far more luxurious and illustrated manuscripts owned by Anne, such as the Grandes Heures. However, the devotional themes of this small book, which dates from Anne’s second marriage, to Louis XII, reveal many of Anne’s interests as duchess of Brittany and queen of France. In particular the inclusion of a series of indulgences, an emphasis on St Anne, St Margaret, and St Louis, and a prayer said for the successful delivery of Clothilde, suggest that the prayer book was designed to articulate Anne’s place in the history of French monarchs, as well as her need to provide an heir for both the duchy of Brittany and the kingdom of France. This article seeks to place the little-known Newberry manuscript and its unusual contents in the context of what we already know of Anne’s devotional interests and the events of her life. Whereas previous scholarship on the manuscript, by Kamerick (Manuscripta, 1995) and L’Estrange (Holy Motherhood, 2008), has focused on the indulgences and childbearing aspects respectively, this article will bring these themes together, suggesting how the manuscript functioned as a whole, articulating a series of Breton and Capetian-Valois devotional legacies that were available to Anne as duchess and queen. Particular attention will be paid to the manuscript’s three miniatures, the illumination of David that opens the manuscript and the Penitential Psalms, and the two illuminations of Christ’s Passion. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 88 (3 ULg)
See detail"Quant femme enfante...": remèdes pour l’accouchement au Moyen Âge
L'Estrange, Elizabeth ULg

in McClive, Cathy; Pellegrin, Nicole (Eds.) Femmes en Fleurs: Santé, Sexualité et Génération du Moyen Age aux Lumieres (2010)

Il est largement admis qu’au Moyen Âge, les soins de l’accouchement sont administrés par les femmes, que ce soit les femmes de la famille, des amies, ou une sage-femme engagée par la famille. Néanmoins, à ... [more ▼]

Il est largement admis qu’au Moyen Âge, les soins de l’accouchement sont administrés par les femmes, que ce soit les femmes de la famille, des amies, ou une sage-femme engagée par la famille. Néanmoins, à cause de la marginalisation des femmes dans les documents historiques, on ne possède que très peu d’informations concernant la gestion du travail et de la chambre d’accouchement. Les « remèdes » pour l’accouchement, peu étudiés mais conservés dans de diverses sources manuscrites, peuvent toutefois nous amener à une compréhension plus nuancée de l’accouchement et du corps maternel. Cet article propose que ces remèdes, qui consistent en des boissons végétales, des rouleaux inscrits des prières, et des références aux histoires bibliques, fournissent aux assistantes un moyen de gérer l’accouchement et de soigner la mère. [less ▲]

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See detailAllison Levy. Re-Membering Masculinity in Early Modern Florence: Widowed Bodies, Mourning and Portraiture.
L'Estrange, Elizabeth ULg

in Medieval Feminist Forum [= MFF] (2009), 45

Book Review of Allison Levy's Re-Membering Masculinity in Early Modern Florence: Widowed Bodies, Mourning and Portraiture.

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See detailGazing at Gawain: Reconsidering Tournaments, Courtly Love, and the Lady Who Looks
L'Estrange, Elizabeth ULg

in Medieval Feminist Forum [= MFF] (2009), 42

Historians have long acknowledged the importance of the female spectator in actual, staged, tournaments, and literary critics have noted her intrinsic role in the tournaments of romance texts.In both ... [more ▼]

Historians have long acknowledged the importance of the female spectator in actual, staged, tournaments, and literary critics have noted her intrinsic role in the tournaments of romance texts.In both cases, she functions as an inspiration to the male knight performing on the field, and as a means of constructing his masculinity.The potential agency of this female spectator who was able to look down on male bodies from a privileged viewing position has, however, been generally overlooked by art historians.This article uses the tournament context, in which women look at men (and vice versa), as a way of moving beyond the binary oppositions such as masculine/feminine, active/passive, that have traditionally structured discussions of gender and the gaze. By looking in particular at the imagery on carved ivory objects made for women, and their relationship to contemporary literature, I will argue for a more nuanced consideration of the ways women were able to look in the Middle Ages. [less ▲]

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See detailHoly Motherhood: Gender, Dynasty and Visual Culture in the Later Middle Ages
L'Estrange, Elizabeth ULg

Book published by Manchester University Press (2008)

This book brings images of holy motherhood and childbearing into the centre of an art-historical enquiry. By focusing on images of St Anne and the Holy Kinship in Books of Hours made for aristocratic ... [more ▼]

This book brings images of holy motherhood and childbearing into the centre of an art-historical enquiry. By focusing on images of St Anne and the Holy Kinship in Books of Hours made for aristocratic women in relation to the dynastic importance of heirs, it reassesses the role of the female viewer as an active agent in the interpretation of pictures and popular devotional rites. Holy motherhood combines an innovative methodology that draws on art-historical and contemporary gender studies with empirical evidence from fifteenth-century manuscripts, to show how images worked not only to script and maintain gender and social roles within patriarchal society but also to offer viewers ways of managing those roles. Some of the manuscripts discussed are relatively unknown and their images and texts are made available to readers for the first time. The study begins by problematising the notion that intimate, post-partum images of holy childbirth found in Books of Hours provide a window onto the medieval past and women's viewing habits. Through an adaptation of Baxadall's 'period eye', the first part of the book explores how aristocratic lay women - and men - viewed and interpreted images of childbirth by considering their familiarity with prayers for childbirth, the lying-in ceremony and the rite of churching. The second part uses this methodology to interpret the images and prayers in six bespoke manuscripts, including the Fitzwilliam Hours, owned by several Angevin and Breton duchesses, and the Hours of Marguerite of Foix. The book will appeal to advanced students, academics and researchers of Art History, Illuminated Manuscripts, Medieval History and Gender Studies. [less ▲]

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See detailPatronage, Devotion and Gender Roles in Burgundian Court Art
L'Estrange, Elizabeth ULg

in Art History (2008), 31(1), 117-122

Review of Pearson's book Envisioning Gender in Burgundian Devotional Art, 1350-1530 and the exhibition and related catalogue, Women of Distinction: Margaret of York and Margaret of Austria, held in ... [more ▼]

Review of Pearson's book Envisioning Gender in Burgundian Devotional Art, 1350-1530 and the exhibition and related catalogue, Women of Distinction: Margaret of York and Margaret of Austria, held in Mechelen in 2005 [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 48 (4 ULg)
See detailImages de la maternité sainte dans deux livres d'heures appartenant aux duchesses de Bretagne
L'Estrange, Elizabeth ULg

in Legaré, Anne-Marie (Ed.) Livres et lectures de femmes: Entre moyen age et renaissance (2008)

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See detailOn the Purification of Women: Churching in Northern France, 1100-1500, by Paula M. Rieder
L'Estrange, Elizabeth ULg

in Medieval Feminist Forum [= MFF] (2007), 43(2), 73-76

Detailed reference viewed: 41 (5 ULg)
See detailLe mécénat d'Anne de Bretagne
L'Estrange, Elizabeth ULg

in Wilson-Chevalier, Kathleen (Ed.) Patronnes et mécènes en France à la Renaissance (2007)

Anne de Bretagne est la dernière duchesse de Bretagne et la seule femme à être couronnée reine de France deux fois, comme épouse de Charles VIII puis de Louis XII. Bien que sa position comme duchesse de ... [more ▼]

Anne de Bretagne est la dernière duchesse de Bretagne et la seule femme à être couronnée reine de France deux fois, comme épouse de Charles VIII puis de Louis XII. Bien que sa position comme duchesse de Bretagne lui donne une place de pion sur l’échiquier politique, elle utilise son mécénat artistique afin de faire valoir ses intérêts personnels et territoriaux. Dans ses manuscrits enluminés, exécutés par des principaux artistes français, elle accorde une place importante à Sainte Anne, sa sainte patronne, et à la Vierge, saintes avec qui elle s’identifie, en attendant son propre héritier, comme mères bénies par dieu. Malgré ses alliances avec la France, elle n’oublie jamais sa chère Bretagne désormais incorporé dans le royaume de France : à Nantes par exemple elle honore ses parents avec un tombeau magnifique, qui renforce un sens de nationalité bretonne. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 114 (4 ULg)
See detailSainte Anne et le mécénat d'Anne de France
L'Estrange, Elizabeth ULg

in Wilson-Chevalier, Kathleen (Ed.) Patronnes et mécènes en France à la Renaissance (2007)

Née en 1461, Anne de France est le premier enfant de Louis XI et de Charlotte de Savoie. Mariée en 1473 à Pierre de Beaujeu, fils cadet du duc de Bourbon, Anne dirige le royaume de son frère, Charles VIII ... [more ▼]

Née en 1461, Anne de France est le premier enfant de Louis XI et de Charlotte de Savoie. Mariée en 1473 à Pierre de Beaujeu, fils cadet du duc de Bourbon, Anne dirige le royaume de son frère, Charles VIII, pendant les premières années de son règne. Politiquement astuce, Anne exerce d’abord son influence à la cour française et plus tard à la cour bourbonnaise, où elle est devenue duchesse suite à la succession au duché de Pierre, succession qu’Anne elle-même a orchestrée. S’insérant dans une tradition à la fois royale et bourbonnaise, Anne met l’accent dans son mécénat sur le personnage de sa sainte patronne, sainte Anne, et sur l’Immaculée conception. En particulier elle utilise les thèmes de sagesse, d’accouchement miraculeuse, et d’éducation qui sont associés à sainte Anne, pour promouvoir et assurer sa position comme éducatrice, femme de pouvoir et, enfin, mère. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 60 (8 ULg)
See detailIsabel Stuart, Duchess of Brittany
L'Estrange, Elizabeth ULg

in Viennot, Elianne (Ed.) Dictionnaire des femmes de l'Ancien Régime (2006)

Detailed reference viewed: 45 (3 ULg)
See detailAnna Peperit Mariam, Elizabeth Johannem, Maria Christum: Images of Childbirth in Late-Medieval Manuscripts
L'Estrange, Elizabeth ULg

in Van der Stock, Jan; Dekeyzer, Brigitte (Eds.) Manuscripts in Transition: Recycling Manuscripts, Texts and Images (2005)

Detailed reference viewed: 35 (3 ULg)
See detailEn/Gendering Representations of Childbirth in Fifteenth-Century Franco-Flemish Devotional Manuscripts
L'Estrange, Elizabeth ULg

Doctoral thesis (2004)

Representations of childbirth in fifteenth-century devotional and historical manuscripts are invariably depicted as post-partum confinement scenes in a domestic interior. These images appear to show a ... [more ▼]

Representations of childbirth in fifteenth-century devotional and historical manuscripts are invariably depicted as post-partum confinement scenes in a domestic interior. These images appear to show a ‘gendered space’ in which women care for each other and men are marginalized. Neglected by medieval art historians, such pictures have been uncritically used by historians of obstetric and social history to prove that childbirth was the one time when medieval women exercised power and control in an otherwise patriarchal society. However, as with all historical evidence, these images do not offer us unmediated access to the past. This thesis brings these domestic, post-partum pictures of childbirth to the centre of an art historical enquiry by undertaking a survey of this iconography in some fifty fifteenth-century manuscripts and incunables. Since the occurrence of this generic iconography cannot be consistently associated with female spectators, it has been necessary to reassess in what way they might be en/gendered: how they were received by their original viewers (male and female) and how we can bring them into meaning as sources for reconstructing the lives of medieval women. To avoid equating these images with reality and reducing the female sex at large to the maternal function, I develop a methodology to show how the social viewing positions occupied by certain spectators would have rendered them sensitive to images of maternity and childbirth. Specifically, I argue that the images of childbirth in a group of fifteenth-century Books of Hours made for male and female members of the houses of Anjou and Brittany would have been seen with a ‘situational eye’ that was informed by the requirements of patriarchal, aristocratic families, and by the dangers surrounding childbirth. My thesis demonstrates that this situational eye can be extended beyond the field of art history to show how other sources from fifteenth-century childbearing such as charms, lying-in, and churching, can be brought into meaning for the women whose social position required them to conceive and give birth to male heirs. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 31 (1 ULg)