References of "Kumita, Janet"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
See detailNanobodies as structural probes to investigate the mechanism of fibril formation by the amyloidogenic variants of human lysozyme
Dumont, Janice ULg; pardon, Els; Aumont-Nicaise, Magali et al

Poster (2012, June)

Six variants of human lysozyme (single-point mutatants I56T, F57I, W64R, D67H and double mutants F57I/T70N, W112R/T70N) are associated with a hereditary non-neuropathic systemic amyloidosis. These ... [more ▼]

Six variants of human lysozyme (single-point mutatants I56T, F57I, W64R, D67H and double mutants F57I/T70N, W112R/T70N) are associated with a hereditary non-neuropathic systemic amyloidosis. These proteins form extracellular amyloid fibrils that deposit in a wide range of tissues and organs such as liver, spleen and kidneys where they cause damages [1]. It was shown that the D67H and I56T mutations cause a loss in stability and more particularly a loss of global cooperativity of protein [1]. Consequently, under physiologically relevant conditions, these variants can transiently populate a partially unfolded state in which the beta-domain and the C-helix are cooperatively unfolded while the rest of the protein remains native like [1]. The formation of intermolecular interactions between the regions that are unfolded in this intermediate state is likely to be a fundamental trigger of the aggregation process that ultimately leads to the formation and deposition of fibrils in tissues. We have also shown that the binding of three variable domain of camelid antibodies (VHHs) - raised against the wild type human lysozyme inhibit in vitro the formation of amyloid fibrils by the lysozyme variants. These three VHHs bind on different regions of lysozyme and act as amyloid fibril inhibitor through different mechanisms [2, 3, and unpublished results]. In the present work, sixteen new VHHs specific of human lysozyme have been generated. Competition experiments have shown that they bind to five non-overlapping epitopes. We have demonstrated that five of these VHHs are able to bind lysozyme in conditions used for amyloid fibril formation, and interestingly two of them recognize two epitopes that are different from those of the three VHHs previously characterized [2, 3, and unpublished results]. The effects of these new VHHs on the properties of lysozyme variants such as stability, cooperativity and aggregation will be discussed. [1] Dumoulin, M., J.R. Kumita, and C.M. Dobson, Normal and aberrant biological self-assembly: Insights from studies of human lysozyme and its amyloidogenic variants. Acc Chem Res, 2006, 39(9), 603-610. [2] Dumoulin, M., et al., A camelid antibody fragment inhibits the formation of amyloid fibrils by human lysozyme. Nature, 2003, 424, 783-788. [3] Chan, P.H., et al., Engineering a camelid antibody fragment that binds to the active site of human lysozyme and inhibits its conversion into amyloid fibrils. Biochemistry, 2008, 47, 11041-11054. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 58 (7 ULg)
See detailVHHs as structural probes to investigate the mechanis of fibril formation by the amyloidogenic variants of human lysozyme
Dumont, Janice; Kumita, Janet; Menzer, Linda et al

Scientific conference (2011, August 26)

Detailed reference viewed: 17 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailEngineering a camelid antibody fragment that binds to the active site of human lysozyme and inhibits its conversion into amyloid fibrils
Chan, Pak Ho; Pardon, Els; Menzer, Linda ULg et al

in Biochemistry (2008), 47

single-domain fragment, cAb-HuL22, of a camelid heavy-chain antibody specific for the active site of human lysozyme has been generated, and its effects on the properties of the I56T and D67H amyloidogenic ... [more ▼]

single-domain fragment, cAb-HuL22, of a camelid heavy-chain antibody specific for the active site of human lysozyme has been generated, and its effects on the properties of the I56T and D67H amyloidogenic variants of human lysozyme, which are associated with a form of systemic amyloidosis, have been investigated by a wide range of biophysical techniques. Pulse-labeling hydrogen-deuterium exchange experiments monitored by mass spectrometry reveal that binding of the antibody fragment strongly inhibits the locally cooperative unfolding of the I56T and D67H variants and restores their global cooperativity to that characteristic of the wild-type protein. The antibody fragment was, however, not stable enough under the conditions used to explore its ability to perturb the aggregation behavior of the lysozyme amyloidogenic variants. We therefore engineered a more stable version of cAb-HuL22 by adding a disulfide bridge between the two beta-sheets in the hydrophobic core of the protein. The binding of this engineered antibody fragment to the amyloidogenic variants of lysozyme inhibited their aggregation into fibrils. These findings support the premise that the reduction in global cooperativity caused by the pathogenic mutations in the lysozyme gene is the determining feature underlying their amyloidogenicity. These observations indicate further that molecular targeting of enzyme active sites, and of protein binding sites in general, is an effective strategy for inhibiting or preventing the aberrant self-assembly process that is often a consequence of protein mutation and the origin of pathogenicity. Moreover, this work further demonstrates the unique properties of camelid single-domain antibody fragments as structural probes for studying the mechanism of aggregation and as potential inhibitors of fibril formation. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 105 (22 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailImpact of the native-state stability of human lysozyme variants on protein secretion by Pichia pastoris
Kumita, Janet; Johnson, Russel; Alcocer, Marcos et al

in FEBS Journal (2006), 273

We report the secreted expression by Pichia pastoris of two human lysozyme variants F57I and W64R, associated with systemic amyloid disease, and describe their characterization by biophysical methods ... [more ▼]

We report the secreted expression by Pichia pastoris of two human lysozyme variants F57I and W64R, associated with systemic amyloid disease, and describe their characterization by biophysical methods. Both variants have a substantially decreased thermostability compared with wild-type human lysozyme, a finding that suggests an explanation for their increased propensity to form fibrillar aggregates and generate disease. The secreted yields of the F57I and W64R variants from P. pastoris are 200- and 30-fold lower, respectively, than that of wild-type human lysozyme. More comprehensive analysis of the secretion levels of 10 lysozyme variants shows that the low yields of these secreted proteins, under controlled conditions, can be directly correlated with a reduction in the thermostability of their native states. Analysis of mRNA levels in this selection of variants suggests that the lower levels of secretion are due to post-transcriptional processes, and that the reduction in secreted protein is a result of degradation of partially folded or misfolded protein via the yeast quality control system. Importantly, our results show that the human disease-associated mutations do not have levels of expression that are out of line with destabilizing mutations at other sites. These findings indicate that a complex interplay between reduced native-state stability, lower secretion levels, and protein aggregation propensity influences the types of mutation that give rise to familial forms of amyloid disease. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 22 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailNormal and aberrant biological self-assembly: Insights from studies of human lysozyme and its amyloidogenic variants
Dumoulin, Mireille ULg; Kumita, Janet; Dobson, Christopher M

in Accounts of Chemical Research (2006), 39

Studies of lysozyme have played a major role over several decades in defining the general principles underlying protein structure, folding, and stability. Following the discovery some 10 years ago that ... [more ▼]

Studies of lysozyme have played a major role over several decades in defining the general principles underlying protein structure, folding, and stability. Following the discovery some 10 years ago that two mutational variants of lysozyme are associated with systemic amyloidosis, these studies have been extended to investigate the mechanism of amyloid fibril formation. This Account describes our present knowledge of lysozyme folding and misfolding, and how the latter can give rise to amyloid disease. It also discusses the significance of these studies for our general understanding of normal and aberrant protein folding in the context of human health and disease. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 33 (3 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailRationalising Lysozyme Amyloidosis: Insights from the Structure and Solution Dynamics of T70N Lysozyme
Johnson, Russell J.K.; Christodoulou, John; Dumoulin, Mireille ULg et al

in Journal of Molecular Biology (2005), 352

T70N human lysozyme is the only known naturally occurring destabilised lysozyme variant that has not been detected in amyloid deposits in human patients. Its study and a comparison of its properties with ... [more ▼]

T70N human lysozyme is the only known naturally occurring destabilised lysozyme variant that has not been detected in amyloid deposits in human patients. Its study and a comparison of its properties with those of the amyloidogenic variants of lysozyme is therefore important for understanding the determinants of amyloid disease. We report here the X-ray crystal structure and the solution dynamics of T70N lysozyme, as monitored by hydrogen/deuterium exchange and NMR relaxation experiments. The X-ray crystal structure shows that a substantial structural rearrangement results from the amino acid substitution, involving residues 45–51 and 68–75 in particular, and gives rise to a concomitant separation of these two loops of up to 6.5 Å. A marked decrease in the magnitudes of the generalised order parameter (S2) values of the amide nitrogen atom, for residues 70–74, shows that the T70N substitution increases the flexibility of the peptide backbone around the site of mutation. Hydrogen/deuterium exchange protection factors measured by NMR spectroscopy were calculated for the T70N variant and the wild-type protein. The protection factors for many of backbone amide groups in the β-domain of the T70N variant are decreased relative to those in the wild-type protein, whereas those in the α-domain display wild-type-like values. In pulse-labelled hydrogen/deuterium exchange experiments monitored by mass spectrometry, transient but locally cooperative unfolding of the β-domain of the T70N variant and the wild-type protein was observed, but at higher temperatures than for the amyloidogenic variants I56T and D67H. These findings reveal that such partial unfolding is an intrinsic property of the human lysozyme structure, and suggest that the readiness with which it occurs is a critical feature determining whether or not amyloid deposition occurs in vivo. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 24 (0 ULg)