References of "Kridelka, Frédéric"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Peer Reviewed
See detailCirculating microRNA-based screening tool for breast cancer
Freres, Pierre ULg; Wenric, Stéphane ULg; Boukerroucha, Meriem et al

in Oncotarget (2015)

Circulating microRNAs (miRNAs) are increasingly recognized as powerful biomarkers in several pathologies, including breast cancer. Here, their plasmatic levels were measured to be used as an alternative ... [more ▼]

Circulating microRNAs (miRNAs) are increasingly recognized as powerful biomarkers in several pathologies, including breast cancer. Here, their plasmatic levels were measured to be used as an alternative screening procedure to mammography for breast cancer diagnosis. A plasma miRNA profile was determined by RT-qPCR in a cohort of 378 women. A diagnostic model was designed based on the expression of 8 miRNAs measured first in a profiling cohort composed of 41 primary breast cancers and 45 controls, and further validated in diverse cohorts composed of 108 primary breast cancers, 88 controls, 35 breast cancers in remission, 31 metastatic breast cancers and 30 gynecologic tumors. A receiver operating characteristic curve derived from the 8-miRNA random forest based diagnostic tool exhibited an area under the curve of 0.81. The accuracy of the diagnostic tool remained unchanged considering age and tumor stage. The miRNA signature correctly identified patients with metastatic breast cancer. The use of the classification model on cohorts of patients with breast cancers in remission and with gynecologic cancers yielded prediction distributions similar to that of the control group. Using a multivariate supervised learning method and a set of 8 circulating miRNAs, we designed an accurate, minimally invasive screening tool for breast cancer. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 51 (15 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailREGISTRE BELGE ET CENTRES DE RÉFÉRENCE POUR LES MALADIES TROPHOBLASTIQUES GESTATIONNELLES
DELCOMINETTE, Sarah ULg; TIMMERMANS, Marie ULg; DELBECQUE, Katty ULg et al

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2015), 70(11), 550-556

Gestational trophoblastic diseases include placental pathologies comprising fertilization abnormalities (hydatidiform moles) and malignant lesions (choriocarcinoma, placental site trophoblastic tumor and ... [more ▼]

Gestational trophoblastic diseases include placental pathologies comprising fertilization abnormalities (hydatidiform moles) and malignant lesions (choriocarcinoma, placental site trophoblastic tumor and epithelioid trophoblastic tumor). Due to their low incidence and heterogeneity, their diagnosis, management and treatment are not always optimal. Following the example of other European countries, a national registration system with two reference centers has been set up to guide physicians and patients and to propose individualized management. The centers offer their expertise through a systematic centralised pathology review by a panel of experts. HCG values are plotted in regression curves. In case of gestational trophoblastic neoplasia, an imaging work-up is proposed, from which the FIGO score and stage are derived and will guide the choice of treatment. Belgian centers offer a multidisciplinary approach, in partnership with the referent physician. More information for practitioners and patients is available on a web site: www.mole-chorio-bgog.eu, which also harbours a forum of discussion. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 68 (12 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailA Simple Laparoscopic Procedure to Restore a Normal Vaginal Length After Colpohysterectomy With Large Upper Colpectomy for Cervical and/or Vaginal Neoplasia.
Leblanc, Eric; Bresson, L.; Merlot, B. et al

in Journal of Minimally Invasive Gynecology (2015)

Detailed reference viewed: 22 (0 ULg)
See detailLaparoscopy and endometrial cancer
KRIDELKA, Frédéric ULg; GOFFIN, Frédéric ULg; Leblanc, Eric et al

in Minimally Invasive surgery (2015)

Detailed reference viewed: 18 (1 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailUnique recurrence patterns of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia following excision of the squamo-columnar junction.
Herfs, Michael ULg; SOMJA, Joan ULg; Howitt, Brooke E. et al

in International journal of cancer. Journal international du cancer (2015), 136

Recent studies have identified a putative cell of origin for cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) and cervical cancer at the squamo-columnar junction (SCJ) and suggest that these cells may not ... [more ▼]

Recent studies have identified a putative cell of origin for cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) and cervical cancer at the squamo-columnar junction (SCJ) and suggest that these cells may not regenerate following excision (LEEP). This study addressed the impact of SCJ excision on the temporal dynamics, histologic and viral (HPV) characteristics of recurrent CIN. One hundred thirty one consecutive patients treated by excision and attending follow-up visits were enrolled. We compared recurrent and initial CIN with attention to excision margins, timing of recurrence, CIN grade, HPV types, p16 immunophenotype, and SCJ immunophenotype. During the follow-up period (up to four years), sixteen (12.2%) recurrences were identified. Four (25%) were identified at the first follow-up visit, closely resembled the initial CIN 2/3 in grade and HPV type, and were typically SCJ marker positive [SCJ(+)], suggesting non-excised (residual) disease. Twelve (75%) manifested after the first postoperative visit and all were in the ectocervix or in mature metaplastic epithelium. All of the 12 delayed recurrences were classified as CIN 1 and were SCJ (-). Nine of 11 SCJ (-) recurrences (82%) followed regressed spontaneously. Taken together, these results show that new lesions developing from any HPV infection are delayed and occur within the ectocervix or metaplastic epithelium. This dramatically lower risk of CIN 2/3 following successful SCJ excision suggests that removal of the SCJ could be a critical variable in reducing the risk of subsequent CIN 2/3 and cervical cancer. (c) 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 57 (7 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailTumor Angiogenesis and Lymphangiogenesis: Microenvironmental Soil for Tumor Progression and Metastatic Dissemination
Paupert, Jenny ULg; Van De Velde, Maureen ULg; Kridelka, Frédéric ULg et al

in Feige, Jean-Jacques; Pagès, Gilles; Soncin, Fabrice (Eds.) Molecular Mechanisms of Angiogenesis (2014)

Detailed reference viewed: 33 (9 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailNational Belgian registration of gestational trophoblastic disease - a Belgian gynaecological oncology group (BGOG) initiative
Han, Sileny; Noel, Jean-Christophe; Moerman, Philippe et al

Poster (2014)

Detailed reference viewed: 17 (1 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailLa menace d'accouchement premature. Prise en charge dans un service universitaire de grossesses a risque : evaluation de la pratique clinique comparee aux recommandations internationals.
Johnson, S.; Kridelka, Frédéric ULg; Nisolle, Michelle ULg et al

in Revue medicale de Liege (2014), 69(12), 658-62

Premature birth poses a real problem of public health. As the principal cause of foetal ill-health and perinatal mortality, it generates high healthcare costs. By seeking to prevent early labour and to ... [more ▼]

Premature birth poses a real problem of public health. As the principal cause of foetal ill-health and perinatal mortality, it generates high healthcare costs. By seeking to prevent early labour and to deal with its causes, a good obstetrical practice can reduce its negative impact, both medical and financial, on society. This article describes the results of a study of threatened preterm delivery admissions at the Citadelle hospital in Liege during the year 2012. The findings are compared to international guidelines with a view to identify aspects that could be improved. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 69 (20 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailImproved computer-assisted analysis of the global lymphatic network in human cervical tissues.
Balsat, Cédric ULg; Signolle, Nicolas; GOFFIN, Frédéric ULg et al

in Modern Pathology : An Official Journal of the United States & Canadian Academy of Pathology, Inc (2014), 27(6), 887-98

Lymphatic dissemination is a key event in cervical cancer progression and related tumor lymphatic markers are viewed as promising prognostic factor of nodal extension. However, validating such parameters ... [more ▼]

Lymphatic dissemination is a key event in cervical cancer progression and related tumor lymphatic markers are viewed as promising prognostic factor of nodal extension. However, validating such parameters requires an objective characterization of the lymphatic vasculature. Here, we performed a global analysis of the lymphatic network using a new computerized method applied on whole uterine cervical digital images. Sixty-eight cases of cervical neoplasia (12 CIN3, 10 FIGO stage 1A and 46 stage IB1) and 10 cases of normal cervical tissue were reacted with antibodies raised against D2-40, D2-40/p16 and D2-40/Ki67. Immunostained structures were automatically detected on whole slides. The lymphatic vessel density (D2-40), proliferating lymphatic vessel density (D2-40/ki67) and spatial lymphatic distribution in respect to the adjacent epithelium were assessed from normal cervix to early cervical cancer and correlated with lymphovascular space invasion and lymph node status. Prominent lymphatic vessel density and proliferating lymphatic vessel density are detected under the transformation zone of benign cervix and no further increase is noted during cancer progression. Notably, a shift of lymphatic vessel distribution toward the neoplastic edges is detected. In IB1 cervical cancer, although intra- and peritumoral lymphatic vessel density are neither correlated with lymphovascular space invasion nor with lymph node metastasis, a specific spatial distribution with more lymphatic vessels in the vicinity of tumor edges is predictive of lymphatic dissemination. Herein, we provide a new computerized method suitable for an innovative detailed analysis of the lymphatic network. We show that the transformation zone of the benign cervix acts as a baseline lymphangiogenic niche before the initiation of neoplastic process. During cancer progression, this specific microenvironment is maintained with lymphatic vessels even in closer vicinity to tumor cells.Modern Pathology advance online publication, 6 December 2013; doi:10.1038/modpathol.2013.195. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 67 (23 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailEvaluation of CellSolutions BestPrep(R) Automated Thin-Layer Liquid-Based Cytology Papanicolaou Slide Preparation and BestCyte(R) Cell Sorter Imaging System.
Delga, Agnes; GOFFIN, Frédéric ULg; Kridelka, Frédéric ULg et al

in Acta cytologica (2014)

Objective: A double-blind study was conducted to compare the performance of the new BestPrep(R) (CellSolutions) liquid-based thin-layer Papanicolaou (Pap) test with ThinPrep(R) (Hologic). Study Design ... [more ▼]

Objective: A double-blind study was conducted to compare the performance of the new BestPrep(R) (CellSolutions) liquid-based thin-layer Papanicolaou (Pap) test with ThinPrep(R) (Hologic). Study Design: Samples from the study patients (n = 105) were collected twice in the same encounter with the ThinPrep sample always taken first and the BestPrep sample collected second. Slides were prepared according to both manufacturers' protocols and evaluated using manual microscopic review and the BestCyte(R) cell sorter imaging system (CellSolutions). Diagnostic truth for each case was determined by independent manual review of both slides by multiple pathologists and histology when available. The presence of atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance was the threshold for positive for sensitivity and specificity calculations. Results: BestPrep and ThinPrep, by manual review, had sensitivities for high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (HSIL) cases of 100 and 95.6%, respectively. Using the BestCyte cell sorter, both had 100% sensitivity. For the same HSIL cases, the digene HC2 high-risk human papillomavirus DNA test had sensitivities of 100% (BestPrep) and 95.6% (ThinPrep). Specificities were 71.4% (BestPrep) and 54.8% (ThinPrep). Conclusions: BestPrep was equivalent to ThinPrep for manual review even though BestPrep was always the second sample collected. The BestCyte cell sorter provides a practical alternative to manual review for both BestPrep and ThinPrep slides. (c) 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 82 (6 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailA phase 1b study of trebananib in combination with pegylated liposomal doxorubicin or topotecan in women with recurrent platinum-resistant or partially platinum-sensitive ovarian cancer.
Vergote, Ignace; Schilder, Russell J.; Pippitt, Charles H. Jr et al

in Gynecologic oncology (2014), 135(1), 25-33

OBJECTIVE: To examine the tolerability and antitumor activity of trebananib plus pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (PLD) or topotecan in recurrent platinum-resistant or partially platinum-sensitive ovarian ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVE: To examine the tolerability and antitumor activity of trebananib plus pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (PLD) or topotecan in recurrent platinum-resistant or partially platinum-sensitive ovarian cancer. METHODS: In this open-label phase 1b study, patients received trebananib 10mg/kg or 15mg/kg IV QW plus PLD 50mg/m(2) (cohorts A1 and A3, respectively) or topotecan 4mg/m(2) (cohorts B1 and B3, respectively). Endpoints were dose-limiting toxicity (DLT; primary); treatment-emergent adverse events (AEs), overall response rate, anti-trebananib antibodies, and pharmacokinetics (secondary). RESULTS: 103 patients were enrolled. One patient in A1 and B1 had DLTs. Across all cohorts, the most common AEs were nausea, fatigue, and peripheral edema. Across both trebananib plus PLD cohorts (A1/A3), grade 4 AEs were pulmonary embolism, disease progression, and anemia. Two patients had grade 5 intestinal perforation (n=1) and sudden death (n=1). Across both trebananib plus topotecan cohorts (B1/B3), grade 4 AEs were neutropenia, hypokalemia, decreased granulocyte count, chest pain, dyspnea, decreased neutrophil count, and pulmonary embolism. Two patients had grade 5 disease progression. One patient had grade 5 pleural effusion associated with progressive disease. Confirmed objective response rates were 36.0% (A1), 34.8% (A3), 16.7% (B1), and 0.0% (B3). Median progression-free survival duration (months) was 7.4 (A1), 7.1 (A3), 3.5 (B1), and 3.1 (B3), respectively. No drug-drug interactions were apparent. CONCLUSIONS: Trebananib 10mg/kg and 15mg/kg IV QW plus PLD or topotecan appear to have acceptable toxicity profiles in recurrent platinum-resistant or partially platinum-sensitive ovarian cancer. Antitumor activity was evident across all cohorts. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 26 (3 ULg)