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See detailAssessing the stimulant and sedative effects of alcohol with explicit and implicit measures in a balanced placebo design
Kreusch, Fanny ULg; Vilenne, Aurélie ULg; Quertemont, Etienne ULg

in Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs (2013), 74(6), 923-930

Objective: Alcohol consumption is characterized by biphasic stimulant and sedative effects. In previous studies, various tools were used to assess these effects, including expectancy questionnaires ... [more ▼]

Objective: Alcohol consumption is characterized by biphasic stimulant and sedative effects. In previous studies, various tools were used to assess these effects, including expectancy questionnaires, implicit association tests, and self-report scales. The present study was aimed at clarifying the relationships between these measures. Method: Three different measures were used to directly or indirectly assess the stimulant and sedative effects of alcohol in 61 undergraduate students. The participants completed the Alcohol Expectancy Questionnaire (AEQ) and performed two unipolar Implicit Association Tasks to assess implicit associations between alcohol and the concepts of “stimulation” and “sedation.” The levels of alcohol consumption also were recorded by means of the Alcohol Use Disorders Identifi cation Test. An alcohol (0.4 g/kg) or placebo challenge was then administered using a balanced placebo design. After alcohol/placebo administration, the participants completed the Biphasic Alcohol Effects Scale (BAES). Results: Alcohol consumption signifi cantly correlated with AEQ alcohol explicit expectancies of arousal and relaxation, whereas no signifi cant correlations were obtained with the implicit associations. There were positive correlations between AEQ and BAES subscales, especially for the arousal subscale of the AEQ. Self-reported sedation recorded with the BAES was signifi cantly affected by what the participants believed that they had drunk but not by the actual consumption of alcohol. Conclusions: These fi ndings indicate that alcohol explicit expectancies of arousal measured with the AEQ best predict current alcohol consumption. Regarding explicit measures of alcohol-induced stimulation and sedation, BAES subscales seem to be more affected by alcohol drinking expectations than by actual alcohol consumption. [less ▲]

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See detailEffects of brand presence and stimulus of comparison on response inhibition toward alcohol cues in male and female heavy drinkers
Kreusch, Fanny ULg; Quertemont, Etienne ULg

in 2010 annual meeting of the Belgian Association for Psychological Sciences (2010)

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See detailResponse inhibition toward alcohol cues in heavy drinkers and alcohol dependent patients
Kreusch, Fanny ULg; Quertemont, Etienne ULg

in Alcoholism, Clinical & Experimental Research (2010), 34(8), 139-139

Alcohol addictive behaviors have been recently associated with a combination of deficits in executive function, such as a weak response inhibition, and potent automatic appetitive responses for alcohol ... [more ▼]

Alcohol addictive behaviors have been recently associated with a combination of deficits in executive function, such as a weak response inhibition, and potent automatic appetitive responses for alcohol-related cues. The aim of the present studies was to investigate response inhibition for alcohol and neutral or soft drink cues in alcohol abusers and alcohol dependent patients. Response inhibition was assessed in a go/nogo task with pictures of alcohols, soft drinks or neutrals objects. In this task, participants had to respond to specific stimuli (go trial) and inhibit that action under a different set of stimuli (nogo trial). Faster responses for alcohol in go trials reflect approach tendency for alcohol cues while false alarm responses for alcohol in nogo trials reflect a deficit in response inhibition toward alcohol-related cues. Moreover, since standard alcohol cues are not equally appreciated across participants, the preference for the different alcoholic drinks presented were measured and analyzed in reference to task responses. Both light and heavy drinkers showed faster responses to alcohol cues in go trial relative to soft/neutral cues. Preliminary results indicate a negative relationship between the preference scores for alcohols and the reaction times to those stimuli in go trials. The present study also demonstrated that the presence of brands logo significantly altered the discrimination and reactions time patterns of response to alcohol and soft cues. [less ▲]

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