References of "Kolenberg, K"
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See detailGaia Data Release 1. Open cluster astrometry: performance, limitations, and future prospects
Gaia Collaboration; van Leeuwen, F.; Vallenari, A. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2017), 601

Context. The first Gaia Data Release contains the Tycho-Gaia Astrometric Solution (TGAS). This is a subset of about 2 million stars for which, besides the position and photometry, the proper motion and ... [more ▼]

Context. The first Gaia Data Release contains the Tycho-Gaia Astrometric Solution (TGAS). This is a subset of about 2 million stars for which, besides the position and photometry, the proper motion and parallax are calculated using Hipparcos and Tycho-2 positions in 1991.25 as prior information. <BR /> Aims: We investigate the scientific potential and limitations of the TGAS component by means of the astrometric data for open clusters. <BR /> Methods: Mean cluster parallax and proper motion values are derived taking into account the error correlations within the astrometric solutions for individual stars, an estimate of the internal velocity dispersion in the cluster, and, where relevant, the effects of the depth of the cluster along the line of sight. Internal consistency of the TGAS data is assessed. <BR /> Results: Values given for standard uncertainties are still inaccurate and may lead to unrealistic unit-weight standard deviations of least squares solutions for cluster parameters. Reconstructed mean cluster parallax and proper motion values are generally in very good agreement with earlier Hipparcos-based determination, although the Gaia mean parallax for the Pleiades is a significant exception. We have no current explanation for that discrepancy. Most clusters are observed to extend to nearly 15 pc from the cluster centre, and it will be up to future Gaia releases to establish whether those potential cluster-member stars are still dynamically bound to the clusters. <BR /> Conclusions: The Gaia DR1 provides the means to examine open clusters far beyond their more easily visible cores, and can provide membership assessments based on proper motions and parallaxes. A combined HR diagram shows the same features as observed before using the Hipparcos data, with clearly increased luminosities for older A and F dwarfs. Tables D.1 to D.19 are also available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to <A href="http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr">http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr</A> (<A href="http://130.79.128.5">http://130.79.128.5</A>) or via <A href="http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/601/A19">http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/601/A19</A> [less ▲]

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See detailGaia Data Release 1. Summary of the astrometric, photometric, and survey properties
Gaia Collaboration; Brown, A. G. A.; Vallenari, A. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2016), 595

Context. At about 1000 days after the launch of Gaia we present the first Gaia data release, Gaia DR1, consisting of astrometry and photometry for over 1 billion sources brighter than magnitude 20.7. <BR ... [more ▼]

Context. At about 1000 days after the launch of Gaia we present the first Gaia data release, Gaia DR1, consisting of astrometry and photometry for over 1 billion sources brighter than magnitude 20.7. <BR /> Aims: A summary of Gaia DR1 is presented along with illustrations of the scientific quality of the data, followed by a discussion of the limitations due to the preliminary nature of this release. <BR /> Methods: The raw data collected by Gaia during the first 14 months of the mission have been processed by the Gaia Data Processing and Analysis Consortium (DPAC) and turned into an astrometric and photometric catalogue. <BR /> Results: Gaia DR1 consists of three components: a primary astrometric data set which contains the positions, parallaxes, and mean proper motions for about 2 million of the brightest stars in common with the Hipparcos and Tycho-2 catalogues - a realisation of the Tycho-Gaia Astrometric Solution (TGAS) - and a secondary astrometric data set containing the positions for an additional 1.1 billion sources. The second component is the photometric data set, consisting of mean G-band magnitudes for all sources. The G-band light curves and the characteristics of 3000 Cepheid and RR Lyrae stars, observed at high cadence around the south ecliptic pole, form the third component. For the primary astrometric data set the typical uncertainty is about 0.3 mas for the positions and parallaxes, and about 1 mas yr[SUP]-1[/SUP] for the proper motions. A systematic component of 0.3 mas should be added to the parallax uncertainties. For the subset of 94 000 Hipparcos stars in the primary data set, the proper motions are much more precise at about 0.06 mas yr[SUP]-1[/SUP]. For the secondary astrometric data set, the typical uncertainty of the positions is 10 mas. The median uncertainties on the mean G-band magnitudes range from the mmag level to 0.03 mag over the magnitude range 5 to 20.7. <BR /> Conclusions: Gaia DR1 is an important milestone ahead of the next Gaia data release, which will feature five-parameter astrometry for all sources. Extensive validation shows that Gaia DR1 represents a major advance in the mapping of the heavens and the availability of basic stellar data that underpin observational astrophysics. Nevertheless, the very preliminary nature of this first Gaia data release does lead to a number of important limitations to the data quality which should be carefully considered before drawing conclusions from the data. [less ▲]

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See detailThe Gaia mission
Gaia Collaboration; Prusti, T.; de Bruijne, J. H. J. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2016), 595

Gaia is a cornerstone mission in the science programme of the EuropeanSpace Agency (ESA). The spacecraft construction was approved in 2006, following a study in which the original interferometric concept ... [more ▼]

Gaia is a cornerstone mission in the science programme of the EuropeanSpace Agency (ESA). The spacecraft construction was approved in 2006, following a study in which the original interferometric concept was changed to a direct-imaging approach. Both the spacecraft and the payload were built by European industry. The involvement of the scientific community focusses on data processing for which the international Gaia Data Processing and Analysis Consortium (DPAC) was selected in 2007. Gaia was launched on 19 December 2013 and arrived at its operating point, the second Lagrange point of the Sun-Earth-Moon system, a few weeks later. The commissioning of the spacecraft and payload was completed on 19 July 2014. The nominal five-year mission started with four weeks of special, ecliptic-pole scanning and subsequently transferred into full-sky scanning mode. We recall the scientific goals of Gaia and give a description of the as-built spacecraft that is currently (mid-2016) being operated to achieve these goals. We pay special attention to the payload module, the performance of which is closely related to the scientific performance of the mission. We provide a summary of the commissioning activities and findings, followed by a description of the routine operational mode. We summarise scientific performance estimates on the basis of in-orbit operations. Several intermediate Gaia data releases are planned and the data can be retrieved from the Gaia Archive, which is available through the Gaia home page. <A href="http://www.cosmos.esa.int/gaia">http://www.cosmos.esa.int/gaia</A> [less ▲]

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See detailThe Asteroseismic Potential of Kepler: First Results for Solar-Type Stars
Chaplin, W. J.; Appourchaux, T.; Elsworth, Y. et al

in Astrophysical Journal Letters (2010), 713

We present preliminary asteroseismic results from Kepler on three G-type stars. The observations, made at one-minute cadence during the first 33.5 days of science operations, reveal high signal-to-noise ... [more ▼]

We present preliminary asteroseismic results from Kepler on three G-type stars. The observations, made at one-minute cadence during the first 33.5 days of science operations, reveal high signal-to-noise solar-like oscillation spectra in all three stars: about 20 modes of oscillation may be clearly distinguished in each star. We discuss the appearance of the oscillation spectra, use the frequencies and frequency separations to provide first results on the radii, masses, and ages of the stars, and comment in the light of these results on prospects for inference on other solar-type stars that Kepler will observe. [less ▲]

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See detailPost-AGB stars with hot circumstellar dust: binarity of the low-amplitude pulsators
van Winckel, H.; Lloyd Evans, T.; Briquet, Maryline ULg et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2009), 505

Context: The influence of binarity on the late stages of stellar evolution remains an open issue. <BR />Aims: While the first binary post-AGB stars were serendipitously discovered, the distinct ... [more ▼]

Context: The influence of binarity on the late stages of stellar evolution remains an open issue. <BR />Aims: While the first binary post-AGB stars were serendipitously discovered, the distinct characteristics of their spectral energy distribution (SED) allowed us to launch a more systematic search for binaries. We selected post-AGB objects, which exhibit a broad dust excess starting either at H or K, pointing to the presence of a gravitationally bound dusty disc in the system. We initiated an extensive multiwavelength study of those systems and here report on our radial velocity and photometric monitoring results for six stars of early F type, which are pulsators of small amplitude. <BR />Methods: To determine the radial velocity of low signal-to-noise ratio time-series data, we constructed dedicated autocorrelation masks based on high signal-to-noise ratio spectra, used in our published chemical studies. The radial velocity variations were analysed in detail to differentiate between pulsational variability and variability caused by orbital motion. When available, the photometric monitoring data were used to complement the time series of radial velocity data and to establish the nature of the pulsation. Finally, orbital minimalisation was performed to constrain the orbital elements. <BR />Results: All of the six objects are binaries with orbital periods ranging from 120 to 1800 days. Five systems have non-circular orbits. The mass functions range from 0.004 to 0.57 M[SUB]&sun;[/SUB] and the companions are probably unevolved objects of (very) low initial mass. We argue that these binaries must have evolved through a phase of strong binary interaction when the primary was a cool supergiant. Although the origin of the circumstellar disc is not well understood, the disc is generally believed to have formed during this strong interaction phase. The eccentric orbits of these highly evolved objects remain poorly understood. In one object, the line-of-sight grazes the edge of the puffed-up inner rim of the disc. <BR />Conclusions: These results corroborate our earlier statement that evolved objects in binary stars create a Keplerian dusty circumbinary disc. With the measured orbits and mass functions, we conclude that the circumbinary discs seem to have a major impact on the evolution of a significant fraction of binary systems. based on observations collected with the Flemish 1.2 m Mercator telescope at Roque de los Muchachos (Spain), the Swiss 1.2 m Euler telescope at La Silla (Chile) and the 0.5 m and 0.75 m telescopes at SAAO (South-Africa). Tables [see full textsee full text]-[see full textsee full text] are only available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org Postdoctoral fellow of the Fund for Scientific Research, Flanders. Ph.D. student of the Fund for Scientific Research, Flanders. [less ▲]

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See detailLong term photometric monitoring with the Mercator telescope. Frequencies and mode identification of variable O-B stars
De Cat, P.; Briquet, Maryline ULg; Aerts, C. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2007), 463

Aims. We selected a large sample of O-B stars that were considered as (candidate) slowly pulsating B, beta Cep, and Maia stars after the analysis of their hipparcos data. We analysed our new seven ... [more ▼]

Aims. We selected a large sample of O-B stars that were considered as (candidate) slowly pulsating B, beta Cep, and Maia stars after the analysis of their hipparcos data. We analysed our new seven passband geneva data collected for these stars during the first three years of scientific operations of the mercator telescope. We performed a frequency analysis for 28 targets with more than 50 high-quality measurements to improve their variability classification. For the pulsating stars, we tried both to identify the modes and to search for rotationally split modes. Methods: We searched for frequencies in all the geneva passbands and colours by using two independent frequency analysis methods and we applied a 3.6 S/N-level criterion to locate the significant peaks in the periodograms. The modes were identified by applying the method of photometric amplitudes for which we calculated a large, homogeneous grid of equilibrium models to perform a pulsational stability analysis. When both the radius and the projected rotational velocity of an object are known, we determined a lower limit for the rotation frequency to estimate the expected frequency spacings in rotationally split pulsation modes. Results: We detected 61 frequencies, among which 33 are new. We classified 21 objects as pulsating variables (7 new confirmed pulsating stars, including 2 hybrid beta Cep/SPB stars), 6 as non-pulsating variables (binaries or spotted stars), and 1 as photometrically constant. All the Maia candidates were reclassified into other variability classes. We performed mode identification for the pulsating variables for the first time. The most probable l value is 0, 1, 2, and 4 for 1, 31, 9, and 5 modes, respectively, including only 4 unambiguous identifications. For 7 stars we cannot rule out that some of the observed frequencies belong to the same rotationally split mode. For 4 targets we may begin to resolve close frequency multiplets. Based on observations collected with the p7 photometer attached to the Flemish 1.2-m mercator telescope situated at the Roque de los Muchachos observatory on La Palma (Spain). Section [see full textsee full text], including Figs. is only available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org, and Tables 2 and 3 are only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/463/243 [less ▲]

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See detailLimits for the application of spectroscopic mode ID methods
Zima, W.; Kolenberg, K.; Briquet, Maryline ULg et al

in IAU Symposium, No. 224, The A-Star Puzzle, held in Poprad, Slovakia, July 8-13, 2004. (2004, December 01)

Spectroscopic mode identification techiques, which monitor intensity variations across an absorption line, provide the possibility of determining the quantum numbers l and m, the inclination and the ... [more ▼]

Spectroscopic mode identification techiques, which monitor intensity variations across an absorption line, provide the possibility of determining the quantum numbers l and m, the inclination and the intrinsic pulsation amplitude of a star. Of course, the uncertainties of the mode identification are dependent on the quality of the observations and the identification method applied. We have focused on the Pixel-by-pixel method/Direct line profile fitting (Mantegazza 2000) and the Moment method (Balona 1987, Briquet & Aerts 2003) for pinpointing mode parameters and tested the impact of various observational effects and stellar properties on the identification. [less ▲]

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See detailMoment Method and Pixel-by-Pixel Method: Complementary Mode Identification I. Testing FG Vir-like pulsation modes
Zima, W.; Kolenberg, K.; Briquet, Maryline ULg et al

in Communications in Asteroseismology (2004), 144

We have carried out a Hare-and-Hound test to determine the reliability of the Moment Method (Briquet & Aerts 2003) and the Pixel-by-Pixel Method (Mantegazza 2000) for the identification of pulsation modes ... [more ▼]

We have carried out a Hare-and-Hound test to determine the reliability of the Moment Method (Briquet & Aerts 2003) and the Pixel-by-Pixel Method (Mantegazza 2000) for the identification of pulsation modes in Delta Scuti stars. For this purpose we calculated synthetic line profiles, exhibiting six pulsation modes of low degree and with input parameters initially unknown to us. The aim was to test and increase the quality of the mode identification by applying both methods independently and by using a combined technique. Our results show that, whereas the azimuthal order m and its sign can be fixed by both methods, the degree l is not determined unambiguously. Both identification methods show a better reliability if multiple modes are fitted simultaneously. In particular, the inclination angle is better determined. We have to emphasize that the outcome of this test is only meaningful for stars having pulsational velocities below 0.2 vsini. This is the first part of a series of articles, in which we will test these spectroscopic identification methods. [less ▲]

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See detailLong-Term Photometric and Spectroscopic Monitoring of Slowly Pulsating B Stars
Aerts, C.; De Cat, P.; De Ridder, J. et al

in The Impact of Large-Scale Surveys on Pulsating Star Research, ASP Conference Series, Vol. 203; also IAU Colloquium #176. Edited by L. Szabados and D. Kurtz, p.437 (2000)

We review the current status of our long-term monitoring project on slowly pulsating B stars that we started in the course of 1996 and that was recently completed as far as the first part of our plan is ... [more ▼]

We review the current status of our long-term monitoring project on slowly pulsating B stars that we started in the course of 1996 and that was recently completed as far as the first part of our plan is concerned. In total, we have selected 17 southern and 8 northern stars. The idea is to fully exploit our current data in the near future and to select the most interesting targets for further very-long-term follow-up monitoring. A first conclusion is that half of the southern targets turn out to be spectroscopic binaries. Some of these have circular orbits and periods of the same order of magnitude as the intrinsic pulsation period(s) of the primary. The eccentric binaries have periods ranging from 12 to 460 d. For most stars the photometric behaviour is dominated by the same frequency as the intrinsic spectroscopic variability. Multiperiodicity in the expected frequency range is found for almost all stars. Two objects, however, turn out to have only one dominant pulsation mode. [less ▲]

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