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See detailStructural Determinants of Specificity and Catalytic Mechanism in mammalian 25-kDa Thiamine Triphosphatase
Delvaux, David; Kerff, Frédéric ULg; Murty, Mamidanna R.V.S. et al

in Biochimica et Biophysica Acta - General Subjects (2013), 1830

Background: Thiamine triphosphate (ThTP) is present in most organisms and might be involved in intracellular signaling. In mammalian cells, the cytosolic ThTP level is controlled by a specific thiamine ... [more ▼]

Background: Thiamine triphosphate (ThTP) is present in most organisms and might be involved in intracellular signaling. In mammalian cells, the cytosolic ThTP level is controlled by a specific thiamine triphosphatase (ThTPase), belonging to the CYTH superfamily of proteins. CYTH proteins are present in all superkingdoms of life and act on various triphosphorylated substrates. Methods: Using crystallography, mass spectrometry and mutational analysis, we identified the key structural determinants of the high specificity and catalytic efficiency of mammalian ThTPase. Results: Triphosphate binding requires three conserved arginines while the catalytic mechanism relies on an unusual lysine-tyrosine dyad. By docking of the ThTP molecule in the active site, we found that Trp-53 should interact with the thiazole part of the substrate molecule, thus playing a key role in substrate recognition and specificity. Sea anemone and zebrafish CYTH proteins, which retain the corresponding Trp residue, are also specific ThTPases. Surprisingly, the whole chromosome region containing the ThTPase gene is lost in birds. Conclusion: The specificity for ThTP is linked to a stacking interaction between the thiazole heterocycle of thiamine and a tryptophan residue. The latter likely plays a key role in the secondary acquisition of ThTPase activity in early metazoan CYTH enzymes, in the lineage leading from cnidarians to mammals. General significance: We show that ThTPase activity is not restricted to mammals as previously thought but is an acquisition of early metazoans. This, and the identification of critically important residues, allows us to draw an evolutionary perspective of the CYTH family of proteins. [less ▲]

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See detailHigh inorganic triphosphatase activities in bacteria and mammalian cells: Identification of the enzymes involved.
Kohn, Grégory ULg; Delvaux, David ULg; Lakaye, Bernard ULg et al

in PLoS ONE (2012), 7(9), 43879

Background: We recently characterized a specific inorganic triphosphatase (PPPase) from Nitrosomonas europaea. This enzyme belongs to the CYTH superfamily of proteins. Many bacterial members of this ... [more ▼]

Background: We recently characterized a specific inorganic triphosphatase (PPPase) from Nitrosomonas europaea. This enzyme belongs to the CYTH superfamily of proteins. Many bacterial members of this family are annotated as predicted adenylate cyclases, because one of the founding members is CyaB adenylate cyclase from A. hydrophila. The aim of the present study is to determine whether other members of the CYTH protein family also have a PPPase activity, if there are PPPase activities in animal tissues and what enzymes are responsible for these activities. Methodology/Principal Findings: Recombinant enzymes were expressed and purified as GST- or His-tagged fusion proteins and the enzyme activities were determined by measuring the release of inorganic phosphate. We show that the hitherto uncharacterized E. coli CYTH protein ygiF is a specific PPPase, but it contributes only marginally to the total PPPase activity in this organism, where the main enzyme responsible for hydrolysis of inorganic triphosphate (PPPi) is inorganic pyrophosphatase. We further show that CyaB hydrolyzes PPPi but this activity is low compared to its adenylate cyclase activity. Finally we demonstrate a high PPPase activity in mammalian and quail tissue, particularly in the brain. We show that this activity is mainly due to Prune, an exopolyphosphatase overexpressed in metastatic tumors where it promotes cell motility. Conclusions and General Significance: We show for the first time that PPPase activities are widespread in bacteria and animals. We identified the enzymes responsible for these activities but we were unable to detect significant amounts of PPPi in E. coli or brain extracts using ion chromatography and capillary electrophoresis. The role of these enzymes may be to hydrolyze PPPi, which could be cytotoxic because of its high affinity for Ca2+, thereby interfering with Ca2+ signaling. [less ▲]

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See detailMolecular evolution of the CYTH superfamily of proteins
Bettendorff, Lucien ULg; Delvaux, David ULg; Kohn, Grégory ULg et al

in FEBS Journal (2012), 279(Suppl. s1), 438

Molecular evolution of the CYTH superfamily of proteins L. Bettendorff, D. Delvaux, G. Kohn, P. Wins, B. Lakaye GIGA-Neurosciences, University of Liège, Belgium The CYTH superfamily of proteins was named ... [more ▼]

Molecular evolution of the CYTH superfamily of proteins L. Bettendorff, D. Delvaux, G. Kohn, P. Wins, B. Lakaye GIGA-Neurosciences, University of Liège, Belgium The CYTH superfamily of proteins was named after the two founding members, the CYaB adenylyl cyclase from Aeromonas hydrophila and the human 25-kDa THiamine triphosphatase (ThTPase). Members of this superfamily of proteins exist in all organisms including bacteria, archaea, plants and animals (except in birds) and can be traced back to the Last Universal Common Ancestor. They are characterized by a consensus sequence including several charged residues involved in divalent cation and triphosphate binding. Indeed, all members of the CYTH family that are characterized act on triphosphate derivatives and require at least one divalent cation for catalysis. The Nitrosomonas europaea (1) and E.coli CYTH proteins are specific inorganic triphosphatases. We propose that inorganic triphosphate (PPPi), the most simple triphosphate compound that can be imagined, is the primitive substrate of CYTH proteins. Other enzyme activities such as adenylate cyclase (in A. hydrophila), mRNA triphosphatase (in fungi and protozoans) and ThTPase (in metazoans) activities are secondary acquisitions. We show that ThTPase activity is not limited to mammals, but Sea anemone and Zebrafish CYTH proteins are already specific ThTPases and the acquisition of this enzyme activity is linked to the presence of a Trp (W53 in mammalian ThTPases) residue involved in the binding of the thiazole heterocycle of the thiamine molecule. The importance of W53 for the specificity of mammalian ThTPases is confirmed by site-directed mutagenesis. Furthermore, we propose a conserved catalytic mechanism between inorganic triphosphatases and ThTPases, based on a catalytic dyad comprising a Lys and a Tyr residue, explaining the alkaline pH optimum of CYTH proteins. (1) Delvaux et al. J. Biol. Chem 286 (2011) 34023-35 [less ▲]

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See detailA specific inorganic triphosphatase from Nitrosomonas europaea: structure and catalytic mechanism
Delvaux, David ULg; Murty, Mamidana R.V.S; Gabelica, Valérie ULg et al

in Journal of Biological Chemistry (2011), 286

The CYTH superfamily of proteins is named after its two founding members, the CyaB adenylyl cyclase from Aeromonas hydrophila and the human 25-kDa thiamine triphosphatase. Because these proteins often ... [more ▼]

The CYTH superfamily of proteins is named after its two founding members, the CyaB adenylyl cyclase from Aeromonas hydrophila and the human 25-kDa thiamine triphosphatase. Because these proteins often form a closed β-barrel, they are also referred to as “Triphosphate Tunnel Metalloenzymes” (TTM). Functionally, they are characterized by their ability to bind triphosphorylated substrates and divalent metal ions. These proteins exist in most organisms and catalyze different reactions, depending on their origin. Here we investigate structural and catalytic properties of the recombinant TTM protein from Nitrosomonas europaea (NeuTTM), a 19-kDa protein. Crystallographic data show that it crystallizes as a dimer and that, in contrast to other TTM proteins, it has an open β-barrel structure. We demonstrate that NeuTTM is a highly specific inorganic triphosphatase, hydrolyzing tripolyphosphate (PPPi) with high catalytic efficiency in the presence of Mg2+. These data are supported by native mass spectrometry analysis showing that the enzyme binds PPPi (and Mg-PPPi) with high affinity (Kd < 1.5 μM), while it has a low affinity for ATP or thiamine triphosphate. In contrast to Aeromonas and Yersinia CyaB proteins, NeuTTM has no adenylyl cyclase activity, but it shares several properties with other enzymes of the CYTH superfamily, e.g. heat-stability, alkaline pH optimum and inhibition by Ca2+ and Zn2+ ions. We suggest a catalytic mechanism involving a catalytic dyad formed by K52 and Y28. The present data provide the first characterization of a new type of phosphohydrolase (unrelated to pyrophosphatases or exopolyphosphatases), able to hydrolyze inorganic triphosphate with high specificity. [less ▲]

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