References of "Klastersky, Jean"
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See detailInsight on variables leading to burnout in cancer physicians
Bragard, Isabelle ULg; Libert, Y.; Etienne, Anne-Marie ULg et al

in Journal of Cancer Education : The Official Journal of the American Association for Cancer Education (2010), 25

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See detailFactors that influence cancer patients' anxiety following a medical consultation: impact of a communication skills training programme for physicians
Lienard, Aurore; Merckaert, Isabelle; Libert, Yves et al

in Annals of Oncology (2006), 17(9), 1450-1458

Background: No study has yet assessed the impact of physicians' skills acquisition after a communication skills training programme on the evolution of patients' anxiety following a medical consultation ... [more ▼]

Background: No study has yet assessed the impact of physicians' skills acquisition after a communication skills training programme on the evolution of patients' anxiety following a medical consultation. This study aimed to compare the impact, on patients' anxiety, of a basic communication skills training programme (BT) and the same programme consolidated by consolidation workshops (CW), and to investigate physicians' communication variables associated with patients' anxiety. Patients and methods: Physicians, after attending the BT, were randomly assigned to CW or to a waiting list. The control group was not a non-intervention group. Consultations with a cancer patient were recorded. Patients' anxiety was assessed with the State Trait Anxiety Inventory before and after a consultation. Communication skills were analysed according to the Cancer Research Campaign Workshop Evaluation Manual. Results: No statistically significant change over time and between groups was observed. Mixed-effects modelling showed that a decrease in patients' anxiety was linked with screening questions (P = 0.045), physicians' satisfaction about support given (P = 0.004) and with patients' distress (P < 0.001). An increase in anxiety was linked with breaking bad news (P = 0.050) and with supportive skills (P = 0.013). No impact of the training programme was observed. Conclusions: This study shows the influence of some communication skills on the evolution of patients' anxiety. Physicians should be aware of these influences. [less ▲]

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See detailDoes psychological characteristic influence physicians' communication styles? Impact of physicians' locus of control on interviews with a cancer patient and a relative
Libert, Yves; Merckaert, Isabelle; Reynaert, Christine et al

in Supportive Care in Cancer (2006), 14(3), 230-242

Context: Physicians' psychological characteristics may influence their communication styles and may thus interfere with patient-centred communication. Objective: Our aim was to test the hypothesis that ... [more ▼]

Context: Physicians' psychological characteristics may influence their communication styles and may thus interfere with patient-centred communication. Objective: Our aim was to test the hypothesis that, in interviews with a cancer patient and a relative, physicians with an "external" locus of control (LOC; who believe that life outcomes are controlled by external forces such as luck, fate or others) have a communication style different from that of physicians with an "internal" LOC (who believe that life outcomes are controlled by their own characteristics or actions). Design, setting, participants and intervention: Eighty-one voluntary physicians practising in the field of oncology were recorded while performing an actual and a simulated interview with a cancer patient and a relative. Main outcome measures: Physicians' communication skills were assessed using the Cancer Research Campaign Workshop Evaluation Manual. Physicians' LOC was assessed using the Rotter I-E scale. The communication skills of the upper and lower quartiles of physicians in respect of their scores on this scale were compared using Student's t test. Results: In actual interviews, physicians with an "external" LOC talked more to the relative (P=0.017) and used more utterances with an assessment function (P=0.010) than physicians with an "internal" LOC. In simulated interviews, physicians with an "external" LOC used less utterances that give premature information (P=0.031) and used more utterances with a supportive function, such as empathy and reassurance (P=0.029), than physicians with an "internal" LOC. Conclusion: These results provide evidence that physicians' LOC can influence their communication styles. Physicians' awareness of this influence constitutes a step towards a tailoring of their communication skills to every patient's and relative's concerns and needs and thus towards a patient-centred communication. [less ▲]

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See detailTeaching communication and stress management skills to junior physicians dealing with cancer patients: a Belgian Interuniversity Curriculum
Bragard, Isabelle ULg; Razavi, Darius; Marchal, Serge et al

in Supportive Care in Cancer (2006), 14(5), 454-461

Background: Ineffective physicians' communication skills have detrimental consequences for patients and their relatives, such as insufficient detection of psychological disturbances, dissatisfaction with ... [more ▼]

Background: Ineffective physicians' communication skills have detrimental consequences for patients and their relatives, such as insufficient detection of psychological disturbances, dissatisfaction with care, poor compliance, and increased risks of litigation for malpractice. These ineffective communication skills also contribute to everyday stress, lack of job satisfaction, and burnout among physicians. Literature shows that communication skills training programs may significantly improve physicians' key communication skills, contributing to improvements in patients' satisfaction with care and physicians' professional satisfaction. This paper describes a Belgian Interuniversity Curriculum (BIC) theoretical roots, principles, and techniques developed for junior physicians specializing in various disciplines dealing with cancer patients. Curriculum description: The 40-h training focuses on two domains: stress management skills and communication skills with cancer patients and their relatives. The teaching method is learner-centered and includes a cognitive, behavioral, and affective approach. The cognitive approach aims to improve physicians' knowledge and skills on the two domains cited. The behavioral approach offers learners the opportunity to practice these appropriate skills through practical exercises and role plays. The affective approach allows participants to express attitudes and feelings that communicating about difficult issues evoke. Such an intensive course seems to be necessary to facilitate the transfer of learned skills in clinical practice. Conclusions: The BIC is the first attempt to bring together a stress management training course and a communication training course that could lead not only to communication skills improvements but also to burnout prevention. [less ▲]

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See detailFactors that influence physicians' detection of distress in patients with cancer - Can a communication skills training program improve physicians' detection?
Merckaert, Isabelle; Libert, Yves; Delvaux, Nicole et al

in Cancer (2005), 104(2), 411-421

BACKGROUND. No study to date has assessed the impact of skills acquisition after a communication skills training program on physicians' ability to detect distress in patients with cancer. METHODS. First ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND. No study to date has assessed the impact of skills acquisition after a communication skills training program on physicians' ability to detect distress in patients with cancer. METHODS. First, the authors used a randomized design to assess the impact, on physicians' ability to detect patients' distress, of a 1-hour theoretical information course followed by 2 communication skills training programs: a 2.5-day basic training program and the same training program consolidated by 6 3-hour consolidation workshops. Then, the investigate contextual, patient, and communication variables or factors associated with physicians' detection of patients' distress were investigated. After they attended the basic communication skills training program, physicians were assigned randomly to consolidation workshops or to a waiting list. Interviews with a cancer patient were recorded before training, after consolidation workshops for the group that attended consolidation workshops, and approximate to 5 months after basic training for the group that attended basic training without the consolidation workshops. Patient distress was recorded with the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale before the interviews. Physicians rated their patients' distress on a visual analog scale after the interviews. Physicians' ability to detect patients' distress was measured through computing differences between physicians' ratings of patients' distress and patients' self-reported distress. Communication skills were analyzed according to the Cancer Research Campaign Workshop Evaluation Manual. RESULTS. Fifty-eight physicians were evaluable. Repeated -measures analysis of variance showed no statistically significant changes over time and between groups in physicians' ability to assess patient distress. Mixed-effects modeling showed that physicians' detection of patients' distress was associated negatively with patients' educational level (P = 0.042) and with patients' self-reported distress (P < 0.000). Mixed-effects modeling also showed that physicians' detection of patient distress was associated positively with physicians breaking bad news (P = 0.022) and using assessment skills (P = 0.015) and supportive skills (P = 0.045). CONCLUSIONS. Contrary to what was expected, no change was observed in physicians' ability to detect distress in patients with cancer after a communication skills training programs, regardless of whether physicians attended the basic training program or the basic training program followed by the consolidation workshops. The results indicated a need for further improvements in physicians' detection skills through specific training modules, including theoretical information about factors that interfere with physicians' detection and through role-playing exercises that focus on assessment and supportive skills that facilitate detection. (c) 2005 American Cancer Society. [less ▲]

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