References of "Kerzmann, Arnaud"
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See detailAssociation of abdominal aortic aneurysm, horseshoe kidneys, and left-sided inferior vena cava: report of two cases.
Radermecker, Marc ULg; Van Damme, Hendrik ULg; Kerzmann, Arnaud ULg et al

in Journal of Vascular Surgery (2008), 47(3), 645-8

Surgery for abdominal aortic aneurysm may be challenging when rare renal or venous anomalies are present. This article reports two similar cases of aortic abdominal aneurysm associated with horseshoe ... [more ▼]

Surgery for abdominal aortic aneurysm may be challenging when rare renal or venous anomalies are present. This article reports two similar cases of aortic abdominal aneurysm associated with horseshoe kidney and left-sided inferior vena cava treated with a transperitoneal approach. Preoperative knowledge of the anatomic situation enabled appropriate aneurysm repair. Operative strategy is discussed. This report describes an uncommon venous vascular malformation complex and stresses the importance of computed tomography imaging not only in assessing the characteristics of the aneurysmal disease but also in detecting variations in pertinent vascular or parenchymal anatomy. [less ▲]

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See detailAortic valve surgery in octogenarians: predictive factors for operative and long-term results
Kolh, Philippe ULg; Kerzmann, Arnaud ULg; Honoré, Charles ULg et al

in European Journal of Cardio - Thoracic Surgery (2007), 31(4), 600-605

Objective: To assess factors influencing operative and tong-term outcome in octogenarians undergoing aortic valve surgery (AVR). Methods: Records of 220 consecutive octogenarians having AVR between 1992 ... [more ▼]

Objective: To assess factors influencing operative and tong-term outcome in octogenarians undergoing aortic valve surgery (AVR). Methods: Records of 220 consecutive octogenarians having AVR between 1992 and 2004 were reviewed, and follow-up obtained (99% complete). Of the group (mean age: 82.8 years; 174 females), 142 patients (65%) were in New York Heart Association (NYHA) class III-IV, 22 (10%) had previous myocardial infarction, 11 (5%) had previous coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG), and 8 (4%) had percutaneous aortic valvuloplasty. There were 44 urgent procedures (20%), and additional CABG was performed in 58 patients (26%). Results: Operative mortality was 13% (9% for AVR, 24% for AVR + CABG). Among the 29 patients who died, 14 (48%) were operated on urgently (32% mortality for urgent procedures). Causes of hospital death were respiratory insufficiency or infection in 16 patients (16/29 = 55%), myocardial, infarction in 8 (28%), stroke in 2 (7%), sepsis in 2 (7%), and renal failure in 1 (3%). Significant postoperative complications were atrial fibrillation in 48 patients (22%), respiratory insufficiency in 46 (21%), permanent atrio-ventricular bloc in 12 (5%), myocardial infarction in 10 (5%), hemodialysis in 4 (2%), and stroke in 4 (2%). Mean hospital and intensive care unit (ICU) stays were 17.6 +/- 5.2 and 6.9 +/- 3.4 days, respectively. Multivariate predictors (p < 0.05) of hospital death were urgent procedure, associated CABG, NYHA class IV, and percutaneous aortic valvuloplasty. Age, associated CABG, and urgent procedure were predictors of prolonged ICU stay. Mean follow-up was 58.2 months and actuarial 5-year survival was 73.2 +/- 6.9%. Age, preoperative myocardial infarction, urgent procedure, and duration of ICU stay were independent predictors of late death. Among 130 patients alive at follow-up, 91% were angina free and 81% in class I-II. Conclusions: AVR in octogenarians can be performed with acceptable mortality, although significant morbidity. These results stress the importance of early operation on elderly patients with aortic valve disease, avoiding urgent procedures. Associated coronary artery disease is a harbinger of poor operative outcome. Long-term survival and functional recovery are excellent. (c) 2007 European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailComment j'explore... les nodules pulmonaires de types verre depoli et mixte: une nouvelle semiologie tomodensitometrique de l'adenocarcinome pulmonaire.
Couvreur, Thierry ULg; Kerzmann, Arnaud ULg; Radermecker, Marc ULg et al

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2007), 62(7-8), 515-22

Recently a new computed tomography semiology of the pulmonary adenocarcinoma was highlighted. Studies on ground-glass nodule and on mixed nodule showed the relation between these radiological images and ... [more ▼]

Recently a new computed tomography semiology of the pulmonary adenocarcinoma was highlighted. Studies on ground-glass nodule and on mixed nodule showed the relation between these radiological images and the different anatomopathological forms of lung adenocarcinoma. Ground-glass opacity can correspond to precancerous lesions and morphological characteristics of nodules are correlated with the prognosis. The presence of spiculation, pleural retraction and air bronchogram is significantly more important in neoplasic lesions. The presence or the apparition of a solid component inside the nodule or the presence of indentation is highly suggestive of adenocarcinoma. A lesion smaller than 20 mm and persistant after 1 month must be, either followed up, or removed by a limited surgical resection. Lesions larger than 20 mm or associated with a solid component must be treated by conventional surgery. [less ▲]

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See detailL'image du mois. SAM apres reparation de la valvule mitrale.
Radermecker, Marc ULg; Warzee, F.; Kerzmann, Arnaud ULg et al

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2007), 62(2), 65

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See detailIntra-arterial thrombolysis of thrombosed popliteal artery aneurysm. A series of six cases
Van Damme, Hendrik ULg; Trotteur, Geneviève ULg; Kerzmann, Arnaud ULg et al

in Acta Chirurgica Belgica (2006), 106(6), 679-683

Aim of the study : To evaluate the role of perioperative, catheter-guided fibrinolysis in the management of thrombosed popliteal artery aneurysms. Material : From 1990 to 2005, six patients suffering ... [more ▼]

Aim of the study : To evaluate the role of perioperative, catheter-guided fibrinolysis in the management of thrombosed popliteal artery aneurysms. Material : From 1990 to 2005, six patients suffering subacute limb ischemia, secondary to thrombosis of a popliteal artery aneurysm, benefited selective intra-arterial fibrinolysis, followed by subsequent aneurysm exclusion and bypass grafting. This represents ten percent of all popliteal aneurysms operated on in that time period and 28% of all thrombosed popliteal artery aneurysms. Results : The lytic procedure was successful in all cases, restituting patency in two (n = 3), one (n = 2) or all (n = 1) crural arteries. The venous bypass graft remained patent in all but one patient. In one patient, the graft occluded at 10 months without limb loss. This outcome compares more favorable than the result obtained with emergent surgery alone for thrombosed popliteal artery aneurysms with profound limb ischemia (eight patients, of whom one required amputation at day 5 and one lost his limb at nine months following graft thrombosis). Conclusion : Preoperative intra-arterial lytic therapy, in the setting of subacute limb ischemia caused by thrombosis of a popliteal artery aneurysm, can be considered as safe and effective. [less ▲]

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See detailConcurrent coronary and carotid artery surgery: factors influencing perioperative outcome and long-term results
Kolh, Philippe ULg; Comté, Laetitia ULg; Tchana-Sato, Vincent ULg et al

in European Heart Journal (2006), 27(1), 49-56

Aims To assess risk factors for early and late outcome after concurrent carotid endarterectomy (CEA) and coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). Methods and results Records of all 311 consecutive patients ... [more ▼]

Aims To assess risk factors for early and late outcome after concurrent carotid endarterectomy (CEA) and coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). Methods and results Records of all 311 consecutive patients having concurrent CEA and CABG from 1989 to 2002 were reviewed, and follow-up obtained (100% complete). In the group (mean age 67 years; 74% males), 62% had triple-vessel disease, 57% unstable angina, 31% left main coronary stenosis, 19% congestive heart failure, and 35% either a history of vascular procedures or existing vasculopathies. Preoperative assessment revealed transient ischaemic attack in 16%, stroke in 7%, and bilateral carotid disease in 20%. There were 7% emergent and 19% urgent operations, and ascending aorta was described as atheromatous or calcified in 21%. Hospital death occurred in 19 patients, myocardial infarction in seven, and permanent stroke in 12. Significant multivariable predictors of hospital death were aortic calcifications, coexisting vasculopathy, and emergent procedure. Significant predictors of postoperative stroke were calcified or dilated aorta, and of prolonged hospital stay were advanced age, unstable angina, and coexisting vascular disease. For hospital survivors, 10-year actuarial late event-free rates were: death, 50%; myocardial infarction, 84%; stroke, 93%; percutaneous angioplasty, 95%; redo CABG, 98%; and all morbidity and mortality, 48%. Significant multivariable predictors of late deaths were coexisting vasculopathy, age, renal insufficiency, previous cardiac surgery, tobacco abuse, calcified or atheromatous aorta, and duration of intensive care unit stay. Conclusion Concurrent CEA and CABG can be performed with acceptable operative mortality and morbidity, and good long-term freedom from coronary and neurologic events. Atheromatous aortic disease is a harbinger of poor operative and long-term outcome. [less ▲]

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See detailAortic valve replacement in octogenarians: operative outcome and long-term results
Kolh, Philippe ULg; Kerzmann, Arnaud ULg; Jacquart, Julie ULg et al

in European Heart Journal (2005, September), 26(Suppl. 1), 676

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See detailConcomitant coronary and carotid artery surgery: operative outcome and long-term results
Kolh, Philippe ULg; Tchana-Sato, Vincent ULg; Honoré, Charles ULg et al

in European Heart Journal (2004), 25(Suppl. S), 360-361

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See detailCardiac Surgery in Octogenarians; Peri-Operative Outcome and Long-Term Results
Kolh, Philippe ULg; Kerzmann, Arnaud ULg; Lahaye, L. et al

in European Heart Journal (2001), 22(14), 1235-43

AIMS: Because the elderly are increasingly referred for operation, we reviewed the results of cardiac surgery in patients of 80 years or older. METHODS AND RESULTS: Records of 182 consecutive ... [more ▼]

AIMS: Because the elderly are increasingly referred for operation, we reviewed the results of cardiac surgery in patients of 80 years or older. METHODS AND RESULTS: Records of 182 consecutive octogenarians who had had cardiac operations between 1992 and 1998 were reviewed. Follow-up was 100% complete. Seventy patients had coronary grafting (CABG), 70 aortic valve replacement, 30 aortic valve replacement+CABG, and 12 mitral valve repair/replacement. Rates of hospital death, stroke, and prolonged stay (>14 days) were as follows: CABG: 7 (10%), 2 (2.8%) and 41 (58%); aortic valve replacement: 6 (8.5%), 2 (2.8%) and 32 (45.7%); aortic valve replacement+CABG: 8 (26.5%), 1 (3.8%) and 14 (46.6%); mitral valve repair/replacement: 3 (25%), 1 (8.3%) and 5 (41.6%). Multivariate predictors (P<0.05) of hospital death were New York Heart Association functional class, urgent procedure, prolonged cardiopulmonary bypass time, and, after aortic valve replacement, previous percutaneous aortic valvuloplasty. Ascending aortic atheromatous disease was predictive of stroke, while pre-operative myocardial infarction was predictive of prolonged hospital stay. Actuarial 5-year survival was as follows: CABG, 65.8+/-8.8%; aortic valve replacement, 63.6+/-7.1%; aortic valve replacement+CABG, 62.4+/-6.8%; mitral valve repair/replacement, 57.1+/-5.6%; and total, 63.0+/-5.6%. Multivariate predictors of late death were pre-operative myocardial infarction, and urgent procedure. Ninety percent of long-term survivors were in New York Heart Association class I or II, and 87% believed having a heart operation after age 80 years was a good choice. CONCLUSION: Cardiac operations are successful in most octogenarians with increased hospital mortality, and longer hospital stay. Long-term survival and quality of life are good. [less ▲]

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See detailNormothermic preservation of rabbit hearts using a new perfluorocarbon emulsion
De Roover, Arnaud ULg; Deby, G.; Chapelle, Jean-Paul ULg et al

Poster (1998, March 07)

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