References of "Kaufman, J*-M"
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See detailCorrection of vitamin D insufficiency with combined strontium ranelate and vitamin D3 in osteoporotic patients.
Rizzoli, R.; Dawson-Hughes, B.; Kaufman, J.-M. et al

in European Journal of Endocrinology (2014), 170(3), 441-50

OBJECTIVE: This study aims to investigate the efficacy and safety of oral fixed-dose combination of strontium ranelate 2 g/vitamin D3 1000 IU daily vs strontium ranelate 2 g daily for correcting vitamin D ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVE: This study aims to investigate the efficacy and safety of oral fixed-dose combination of strontium ranelate 2 g/vitamin D3 1000 IU daily vs strontium ranelate 2 g daily for correcting vitamin D insufficiency in osteoporosis. DESIGN: A 6-month international, randomized, double-blind, parallel-group, phase 3 study. METHODS: A total of 518 men and postmenopausal women aged >/=50 years with primary osteoporosis (T-score </=-2.5 s.d.) and serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) >22.5 nmol/l were included. Patients were allocated to strontium ranelate 2 g/vitamin D3 1000 IU daily (n=413) or strontium ranelate 2 g daily (n=105). The participants received calcium 1 g daily. The primary endpoint was serum 25(OH)D at last post-baseline evaluation during 3 months. RESULTS: Both groups were comparable at baseline. Mean baseline of 25(OH)D was 44.1+/-14.6 nmol/l. After 3 months, the percentage of patients with 25(OH)D >/=50 nmol/l was higher with strontium ranelate/vitamin D3 vs strontium ranelate (84 vs 44%, P<0.001; adjusted between-group odds ratio=6.7; 95% CI, 4.2-10.9). The efficacy of the fixed-dose combination on 25(OH)D was maintained at 6 months (86 vs 40%, P<0.001). Mean 25(OH)D was 65.1 and 49.5 nmol/l, respectively, after 3 months and 66.9 and 45.4 nmol/l after 6 months. Physical performance improved in both groups. Falls were 17 and 20% in the strontium ranelate/vitamin D3 and strontium ranelate groups respectively. Parathyroid hormone levels were inversely correlated with 25(OH)D. No clinically relevant differences in safety were observed. CONCLUSIONS: This study confirms the efficacy and safety of fixed-dose combination of strontium ranelate 2 g/vitamin D3 1000 IU for correction of vitamin D insufficiency in osteoporotic patients. [less ▲]

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See detailVitamin D supplementation in elderly or postmenopausal women: a 2013 update of the 2008 recommendations from the European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis (ESCEO).
Rizzoli, R.; Boonen, S.; Brandi, M.-L. et al

in Current Medical Research & Opinion (2013), 29(4), 305-13

Abstract Background: Vitamin D insufficiency has deleterious consequences on health outcomes. In elderly or postmenopausal women, it may exacerbate osteoporosis. Scope: There is currently no clear ... [more ▼]

Abstract Background: Vitamin D insufficiency has deleterious consequences on health outcomes. In elderly or postmenopausal women, it may exacerbate osteoporosis. Scope: There is currently no clear consensus on definitions of vitamin D insufficiency or minimal targets for vitamin D concentrations and proposed targets vary with the population. In view of the potential confusion for practitioners on when to treat and what to achieve, the European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis (ESCEO) convened a meeting to provide recommendations for clinical practice, to ensure the optimal management of elderly and postmenopausal women with regard to vitamin D supplementation. Findings: Vitamin D has both skeletal and extra-skeletal benefits. Patients with serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25-(OH)D) levels <50 nmol/L have increased bone turnover, bone loss, and possibly mineralization defects compared with patients with levels >50 nmol/L. Similar relationships have been reported for frailty, nonvertebral and hip fracture, and all-cause mortality, with poorer outcomes at <50 nmol/L. Conclusion: The ESCEO recommends that 50 nmol/L (i.e. 20 ng/mL) should be the minimal serum 25-(OH)D concentration at the population level and in patients with osteoporosis to ensure optimal bone health. Below this threshold, supplementation is recommended at 800 to 1000 IU/day. Vitamin D supplementation is safe up to 10,000 IU/day (upper limit of safety) resulting in an upper limit of adequacy of 125 nmol/L 25-(OH)D. Daily consumption of calcium- and vitamin-D-fortified food products (e.g. yoghurt or milk) can help improve vitamin D intake. Above the threshold of 50 nmol/L, there is no clear evidence for additional benefits of supplementation. On the other hand, in fragile elderly subjects who are at elevated risk for falls and fracture, the ESCEO recommends a minimal serum 25-(OH)D level of 75 nmol/L (i.e. 30 ng/mL), for the greatest impact on fracture. [less ▲]

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See detailExtraskeletal benefits and risks of calcium, vitamin D and anti-osteoporosis medications.
Body, J.-J.; Bergmann, P.; Boonen, S. et al

in Osteoporosis international : a journal established as result of cooperation between the European Foundation for Osteoporosis and the National Osteoporosis Foundation of the USA (2012), 23 Suppl 1

Drugs used for the prevention and the treatment of osteoporosis exert various favourable and unfavourable extra-skeletal effects whose importance is increasingly recognized notably for treatment selection ... [more ▼]

Drugs used for the prevention and the treatment of osteoporosis exert various favourable and unfavourable extra-skeletal effects whose importance is increasingly recognized notably for treatment selection. INTRODUCTION: The therapeutic armamentarium for the prevention and the treatment of osteoporosis is increasingly large, and possible extra-skeletal effects of available drugs could influence the choice of a particular compound. METHODS: The present document is the result of a national consensus, based on a systematic and critical review of the literature. RESULTS: Observational research has suggested an inverse relationship between calcium intake and cardiovascular diseases, notably through an effect on blood pressure, but recent data suggest a possible deleterious effect of calcium supplements on cardiovascular risk. Many diverse studies have implicated vitamin D in the pathogenesis of clinically important non-skeletal functions or diseases, especially muscle function, cardiovascular disease, autoimmune diseases and common cancers. The possible effects of oral or intravenous bisphosphonates are well-known. They have been associated with an increased risk of oesophageal cancer or atrial fibrillation, but large-scale studies have not found any association with bisphosphonate use. Selective oestrogen receptor modulators have demonstrated favourable or unfavourable extra-skeletal effects that vary between compounds. Strontium ranelate has a limited number of non-skeletal effects. A reported increase in the risk of venous thromboembolism is not found in observational studies, and very rare cases of cutaneous hypersensitivity reactions have been reported. Denosumab has been introduced recently, and its extra-skeletal effects still have to be assessed. CONCLUSION: Several non-skeletal effects of bone drugs are well demonstrated and influence treatment choices. [less ▲]

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See detailFracture risk and zoledronic acid therapy in men with osteoporosis
Boonen, S.; REGINSTER, Jean-Yves ULg; Kaufman, J.-M. et al

in New England Journal of Medicine (2012), 367(18), 1714-1723

BACKGROUND: Fractures in men are a major health issue, and data on the antifracture efficacy of therapies for osteoporosis in men are limited. We studied the effect of zoledronic acid on fracture risk ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Fractures in men are a major health issue, and data on the antifracture efficacy of therapies for osteoporosis in men are limited. We studied the effect of zoledronic acid on fracture risk among men with osteoporosis. METHODS: In this multicenter, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, we randomly assigned 1199 men with primary or hypogonadism-associated osteoporosis who were 50 to 85 years of age to receive an intravenous infusion of zoledronic acid (5 mg) or placebo at baseline and at 12 months. Participants received daily calcium and vitamin D supplementation. The primary end point was the proportion of participants with one or more new morphometric vertebral fractures over a period of 24 months. RESULTS: The rate of any new morphometric vertebral fracture was 1.6% in the zoledronic acid group and 4.9% in the placebo group over the 24-month period, representing a 67% risk reduction with zoledronic acid (relative risk, 0.33; 95% confidence interval, 0.16 to 0.70; P = 0.002). As compared with men who received placebo, men who received zoledronic acid had fewer moderate-to-severe vertebral fractures (P = 0.03) and less height loss (P = 0.002). Fewer participants who received zoledronic acid had clinical vertebral or nonvertebral fractures, although this difference did not reach significance because of the small number of fractures. Bone mineral density was higher and bone-turnover markers were lower in the men who received zoledronic acid (P<0.05 for both comparisons). Results were similar in men with low serum levels of total testosterone. The zoledronic acid and placebo groups did not differ significantly with respect to the incidence of death (2.6% and 2.9%, respectively) or serious adverse events (25.3% and 25.2%). CONCLUSIONS: Zoledronic acid treatment was associated with a significantly reduced risk of vertebral fracture among men with osteoporosis. (Funded by Novartis Pharma; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00439647.) Copyright © 2012 Massachusetts Medical Society. [less ▲]

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See detailCutaneous side effects of antiosteoporosis treatments
Musette, P.; Kaufman, J.-M.; Rizzoli, R. et al

in Therapeutic Advances in Musculoskeletal Disease (2011), 3(1), 31-41

Cutaneous adverse reactions are reported for many therapeutic agents and, in general, are observed in between 0% and 8% of treated patients depending on the drug. Antiosteoporotic agents are considered to ... [more ▼]

Cutaneous adverse reactions are reported for many therapeutic agents and, in general, are observed in between 0% and 8% of treated patients depending on the drug. Antiosteoporotic agents are considered to be safe in terms of cutaneous effects, however there have been a number of case reports of cutaneous adverse reactions which warrant consideration. This was the subject of a working group meeting of the European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis in April 2009, which focused on the impact of cutaneous adverse reactions and drug-induced hypersensitivity in the management of postmenopausal osteoporosis. This position paper was drafted following these discussions and includes a flowchart for their recognition. Cutaneous adverse reactions observed with antiosteoporotic agents were reviewed and included information from case reports, regulatory documents and pharmacovigilance. These reactions ranged from benign effects including exanthematous or maculopapular eruption (drug rash), photosensitivity and urticaria, to the severe and potentially life-threatening reactions of angioedema, drug rash with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS), Stevens Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis. A review of the available evidence demonstrates that cutaneous adverse reactions occur with all commonly used antiosteoporotic treatments. Notably, there are reports of Stevens Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis for bisphosphonates, and of DRESS and toxic epidermal necrolysis for strontium ranelate. These severe reactions remain very rare (<1 in 10,000 cases). In general, with proper management and early recognition, including immediate and permanent withdrawal of the culprit agent, accompanied by hospitalization, rehydration and systemic corticosteroids if necessary, the prognosis is positive. © The Author(s), 2011. [less ▲]

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See detailThe need for a transparent, ethical, and successful relationship between academic scientists and the pharmaceutical industry: a view of the Group for the Respect of Ethics and Excellence in Science (GREES).
Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Kanis, J. A.; Ibar-Abadie, M*-E et al

in Osteoporosis International (2010), 21(5), 713-22

This paper provides recommendations for fair and unbiased relationship between academic scientists and the pharmaceutical industry. INTRODUCTION: Real or perceived problems in the relationship between ... [more ▼]

This paper provides recommendations for fair and unbiased relationship between academic scientists and the pharmaceutical industry. INTRODUCTION: Real or perceived problems in the relationship between academics and the industry have been the subject of much recent debate. It has been suggested that academic clinicians should sever all links with the industry-a view that is rarely challenged. METHODS: Academic experts and members of the pharmaceutical industry were invited to an expert consensus meeting to debate this topic. This meeting was organized by the Group for the Respect of Ethics and Excellence in Science. Conflict of interest, competing interest, right and duties of academic scientist, authorship, and staff and student education were discussed. RESULTS: Guidelines for a transparent, ethical, strong, and successful partnership between the academic scientist and the pharmaceutical industry have been provided. CONCLUSIONS: The Group support interactions between the industry and clinicians provided that it is transparent and ethical. [less ▲]

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See detailEffects of ciclesonide and fluticasone on cortisol secretion in patients with persistent asthma.
Derom, E.; Louis, Renaud ULg; Tiesler, C. et al

in European Respiratory Journal (2009), 33(6), 1277-86

We compared the systemic and clinical effects of ciclesonide (CIC) and fluticasone propionate (FP) administered, in addition to CIC 160 microg x day(-1) and salmeterol 50 microg twice daily, in 32 ... [more ▼]

We compared the systemic and clinical effects of ciclesonide (CIC) and fluticasone propionate (FP) administered, in addition to CIC 160 microg x day(-1) and salmeterol 50 microg twice daily, in 32 patients with persistent asthma using a randomised double-blind, placebo-controlled, double-dummy, five-period crossover design. All patients exhibited a provocative concentration leading to a 20% decrease in forced expiratory volume in 1 s (PC(20)) methacholine <8 mg x mL(-1) and a PC(20) adenosine <60 mg x mL(-1). Primary outcome was 24-h serum cortisol suppression after 7 days. Secondary outcomes were changes in PC(20) methacholine and adenosine after 9 days. FP 500 microg x day(-1) and 1,000 microg x day(-1) significantly suppressed cortisol secretion versus placebo by -46.2 (95% confidence interval (CI) -83.8- -8.5) nmol x L(-1) and by -76.1 (95% CI -112.9- -39.3) nmol x L(-1), respectively. Neither dose of CIC (320 nor 640 microg x day(-1)) had a significant suppressive effect (-28.2 (95% CI -65.5-9.2) nmol x L(-1) and -37.3 (95% CI -74.7-0.0) nmol x L(-1), respectively). Differences between FP 1,000 microg x day(-1) and both CIC treatments were statistically significant (CIC 320 microg x day(-1): -48.0 (95% CI -84.8- -11.1) nmol x L(-1); CIC 640 microg x day(-1): -38.8 (95% CI -75.7- -1.9) nmol x L(-1)). Compared with placebo, the increase in PC(20) adenosine after the four treatments was small, but significant. Greater improvements in PC(20) adenosine were seen with FP 500 microg x day(-1) (1.8 (95% CI 1.0-2.6) doubling concentrations) compared with CIC 320 microg x day(-1) (0.9 (95% CI 0.1-1.7) doubling concentrations). No significant difference was seen between CIC 640 microg x day(-1) and FP 1,000 microg x day(-1). For a similar decrease in hyperresponsiveness, cortisol secretion was suppressed significantly with moderate-to-high doses of fluticasone propionate, but not with ciclesonide. [less ▲]

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See detailManagement of patients with Paget's disease: a consensus document of the Belgian Bone Club.
Devogelaer, Jean-Pierre; Bergmann, Pierre; Body, Jean-Jacques et al

in Osteoporosis International (2008), 19(8), 1109-17

Paget's disease of bone (PDB) is a potentially crippling condition. Pain, fracture, spinal stenosis, nerve entrapment, vascular steal syndrome, secondary osteoarthritis, bone deformity, dental problems ... [more ▼]

Paget's disease of bone (PDB) is a potentially crippling condition. Pain, fracture, spinal stenosis, nerve entrapment, vascular steal syndrome, secondary osteoarthritis, bone deformity, dental problems, deafness, excessive bleeding during orthopaedic surgery, rare sarcomatous degeneration, and hypercalcaemia constitute complications that may impair the quality of life. The therapeutic approach varies from symptomatic (analgesics, anti-inflammatory drugs) to more specific drugs such as increasingly potent bisphosphonates. Studies such as the PRISM study should in the future help to determine the superiority or not of aggressive treatment over symptomatic treatment in the prevention of complications. Various oral and/or intravenous (i.v.) bisphosphonates have been tested and are currently on the market. The most recently available nitrogen-containing bisphosphonate, i.v. zoledronic acid, is the most potent therapy available for the treatment of PDB. Its therapeutic efficacy, its long-term effect on biologic activity and its good tolerance currently supports its use as a first-line therapeutic option in patients suffering from PDB. [less ▲]

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See detailDo estrogens effectively prevent osteoporosis-related fractures?
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Audan, M. et al

in Calcified Tissue International (2000), 67

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