References of "Karoui, Romdhane"
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See detailUse of Front-Face Fluorescence Spectroscopy to Differentiate Sheep Milks from Different Genotypes and Feeding Systems
Hammami, Moncef; Dridi, sami; Zaïdi, Fethi et al

in International Journal of Food Properties (2013), 16(Issue 6),

The objective of the present study was to assess the potential of front-face fluorescence spectroscopy coupled with chemometric tools for the evaluation of the quality of milk samples according to the ... [more ▼]

The objective of the present study was to assess the potential of front-face fluorescence spectroscopy coupled with chemometric tools for the evaluation of the quality of milk samples according to the feeding system and genotype. Fifty (n = 50) ewe's milk samples were scanned after excitation set at 250, 290, 322, and 380 nm and emission set at 410 nm. Thirty out of the 50 samples composed the first trial and were obtained from two different genotypes (i.e., Comisana versus Sicilo-Sarde); the second trial was composed of 20 samples obtained from the Sicilo-Sarde genotype with two different feeding systems in pen (soybean versus scotch bean). Milk samples were divided into four groups named Sicilo-Sarde with pasture feeding (Spas), Comisana with pasture feeding (Cpas), Sicilo-Sarde feeding on scotch bean (Ssco), and Sicilo-Sarde feeding on soybean (Ssoy). The factorial discriminant analysis was applied to the: (i) four groups (i.e., Spas, Ssco, Ssoy, and Cpas) and (ii) three groups composed only of Sicilo-Sarde genotype (i.e., Spas, Ssco, and Ssoy). Considering the four groups, the best result was obtained with the excitation vitamin A spectra since correct classification amounting to 76% was observed. When the factorial discriminant analysis was performed with the three groups belonging to the Sicilo-Sarde genotype, the best result was obtained again with vitamin A spectra (i.e., emission and excitation spectra) since 88.6% of correct classification was observed. Concatenation technique applied to the five fluorescence spectra improved the rate of classification between the four groups since 44 out of 50 samples were correctly classified. No misclassification was observed between milk samples collected from ewes with pasture feeding from the pen feeding. It was concluded from the obtained results that fluorescence spectroscopy could be considered as a powerful tool for differentiating between raw milks according to both genotype and feeding system. [less ▲]

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See detailEffect of air-drying conditions on physical and nutritional properties of osmotically pre-treated pomegranate seeds
Bchir, Brahim ULg; Besbes, Souhail; Karoui, Romdhane et al

Poster (2012, June 01)

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See detailMid infrared and fluorescence spectroscopies coupled with factorial discriminant analysis technique to identify sheep milk from different feeding systems
Karoui, Romdhane; Hammami, Moncef; Rouissi, Hamadi et al

in Food Chemistry (2011), 127(2), 743-748

Mid infrared spectroscopy (MIR) combined with multivariate data analysis was used to discriminate between ewes milk samples according to their feeding systems (controls, ewes fed scotch bean and ewes fed ... [more ▼]

Mid infrared spectroscopy (MIR) combined with multivariate data analysis was used to discriminate between ewes milk samples according to their feeding systems (controls, ewes fed scotch bean and ewes fed soybean). The MIR spectra were scanned throughout the first 11 weeks of the lactation stage. When factorial discriminant analysis (FDA) with leave one-out cross-validation was applied, separately, to the three spectral regions in the MIR (i.e. 3000-2800, 1700-1500 and 1500-900 cm(-1)), the classification rate was not satisfactory. Therefore, the first principal component (PCs) scores (corresponding to 3, 10 and 10 for, respectively, the 3000-2800, 1700-1500 and 1500-900 cm(-1)) of the principal component analysis (PCA) extracted from each of the data sets were pooled (concatenated) into a single matrix and analysed by FDA. Correct classification amounting to 71.7% was obtained. Finally, the same procedure was applied to the MIR and fluorescence data sets and 98% of milk samples were found to be correctly classified. Milk samples belonging to control and soybean groups were 100% correctly classified. Regarding milk samples originating from the scotch bean group, only 2 out of 33 samples were misclassified. It was concluded that concatenation of the data sets collected from the two spectroscopic techniques is an efficient tool for authenticating milk samples according to their feeding systems, regardless of the lactation stage. (C) 2011 Published by Elsevier Ltd. [less ▲]

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See detailEffect of Air-Drying Conditions on Physico-chemical Properties of Osmotically Pre-treated Pomegranate Seeds
Bchir, Brahim ULg; Besbes, Souhail; Karoui, Romdhane et al

in Food and Bioprocess Technology (2010)

The drying of pomegranate seeds was investigated <br />at 40 °C, 50 °C and 60 °C with air velocity of 2 m/s. <br />Prior to drying, seeds were osmodehydrated in 55 °Brix <br />sucrose solution for 20 min ... [more ▼]

The drying of pomegranate seeds was investigated <br />at 40 °C, 50 °C and 60 °C with air velocity of 2 m/s. <br />Prior to drying, seeds were osmodehydrated in 55 °Brix <br />sucrose solution for 20 min at 50 °C. The drying kinetics <br />and the effects of osmotic dehydration (OD) and air-drying <br />temperature on antioxidant capacity, total phenolics, colour <br />and texture were determined. Analysis of variance revealed <br />that OD and air-drying temperature have a significant <br />influence on the quality of seeds. Both anthocyanin and <br />total phenolic contents decreased when air-drying temperature <br />increased. The radical diphenylpicril-hydrazyl activity <br />showed the lowest antioxidant activity at 60 °C. Both <br />chromatic parameters (L*, C* and h°) and browning index <br />were affected by drying temperatures, which contributed to <br />the discolouring of seeds. The final product has 22%, 20% <br />and 16% of moisture; 0.630, 0.478 and 0.414 of aw; 151, <br />141 and 134 mg gallic acid equivalent/100 g fresh matter <br />(FM) of total phenolics; 40, 24, 20 mg/100 g FM of <br />anthocyanins and 46%, 39% and 31% of antioxidant <br />activity, for drying temperatures of 40 °C, 50 °C and <br />60 °C, respectively. In view of these results, the temperature <br />of 40 °C is recommended as it has the lowest impact on <br />the quality parameters of the seeds. Differential scanning <br />calorimetry data provided complementary information on <br />the mobility changes of water during drying. Glass <br />transition temperature (Tg′) depends on moisture content <br />and as consequence, on drying conditions. In fact, Tg′ of <br />seeds dried at 60 °C (Tg′=−21 °C) was higher than those <br />dried at 50 °C (Tg′=−28 °C) or 40 °C (Tg′=−31 °C) and <br />osmodehydrated seeds (Tg′=−34 °C). During OD and <br />drying process, the texture of seeds changed. The thickness <br />of seeds shrank by 55% at 60 °C. [less ▲]

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See detailUtilisation du jus de datte comme milieu d’immersion pour la déshydratation osmotique des graines de grenade
Bchir, Brahim ULg; Besbes, Souhail; Karoui, Romdhane et al

Poster (2010, October 14)

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See detailOsmotic Dehydration Kinetics of Pomegranate Seeds Using Date Juice as an Immersion Solution Base
Bchir, Brahim ULg; Besbes, Souhail; Karoui, Romdhane et al

in Food and Bioprocess Technology (2010)

Pomegranate seeds were osmodehydrated using date juice added with sucrose (final °Brix, 55) as immersion solution. The kinetics of osmotic dehydration showed that the most significant changes of mass ... [more ▼]

Pomegranate seeds were osmodehydrated using date juice added with sucrose (final °Brix, 55) as immersion solution. The kinetics of osmotic dehydration showed that the most significant changes of mass transfer took place during the first 20 min of the process, regardless of date juice <br />varieties. During this time, seed water loss and solid gain were estimated to be ∼39% and ∼6%, respectively. After 20 min of the process, the percentage of water loss and solid gain varied slightly and ranged on average close to ∼40% and ∼9%, respectively. During osmotic dehydration, there was a leaching <br />of natural solutes from seeds into the solution, which is <br />quantitatively not negligible, and might have an important <br />impact on the sensorial and nutritional value of seeds and date <br />juices. Both scanning electron microscopy and texture <br />(compression) analysis revealed that osmotic dehydration <br />process induced modifications of seed texture and cell <br />structure. Sucrose was found to be the essential element which <br />influences the texture of seed and the viscosity of date juice. <br />Additionally, natural sugar present in date juice permits <br />substituting 35% of the total quantity of sucrose added to the <br />osmotic solution. [less ▲]

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See detailFluorescence spectroscopy coupled with factorial discriminant analysis technique to identify sheep milk from different feeding systems.
Hammami, M.; Rouissi, H.; Salah, N. et al

in Food Chemistry (2010)

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