References of "Kaltenegger, L"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
See detailTechnology for a Mid-IR Flagship Mission to Characterize Earth-like Exoplanets
Lawson, P. R.; Absil, Olivier ULg; Akeson, R. L. et al

E-print/Working paper (2009)

The exploration of Earth-like exoplanets will be enabled at mid-infrared wavelengths through technology and engineering advances in nulling interferometry and precision formation flying. Nulling ... [more ▼]

The exploration of Earth-like exoplanets will be enabled at mid-infrared wavelengths through technology and engineering advances in nulling interferometry and precision formation flying. Nulling interferometry provides the dynamic range needed for the detection of biomarkers. Formation flying provides the angular resolution required in the mid-infrared to separately distinguish the spectra of planets in multi-planet systems. The flight performance requirements for nulling have been met and must now be validated in a flight-like environment. Formation-flying algorithms have been demonstrated in the lab and must now be validated in space. Our proposed technology program is described. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 28 (3 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailDarwin-A Mission to Detect and Search for Life on Extrasolar Planets
Cockell, C. S.; Léger, A.; Fridlund, M. et al

in Astrobiology (2009), 9(1)

The discovery of extrasolar planets is one of the greatest achievements of modern astronomy. The detection of planets that vary widely in mass demonstrates that extrasolar planets of low mass exist. In ... [more ▼]

The discovery of extrasolar planets is one of the greatest achievements of modern astronomy. The detection of planets that vary widely in mass demonstrates that extrasolar planets of low mass exist. In this paper, we describe a mission, called Darwin, whose primary goal is the search for, and characterization of, terrestrial extrasolar planets and the search for life. Accomplishing the mission objectives will require collaborative science across disciplines, including astrophysics, planetary sciences, chemistry, and microbiology. Darwin is designed to detect rocky planets similar to Earth and perform spectroscopic analysis at mid-infrared wavelengths (6-20 mum), where an advantageous contrast ratio between star and planet occurs. The baseline mission is projected to last 5 years and consists of approximately 200 individual target stars. Among these, 25-50 planetary systems can be studied spectroscopically, which will include the search for gases such as CO[SUB]2[/SUB], H[SUB]2[/SUB]O, CH[SUB]4[/SUB], and O[SUB]3[/SUB]. Many of the key technologies required for the construction of Darwin have already been demonstrated, and the remainder are estimated to be mature in the near future. Darwin is a mission that will ignite intense interest in both the research community and the wider public. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 181 (18 ULg)
Full Text
See detailOverview of the DARWIN mission
Kaltenegger, L.; Karlsson, A.; Fridlund, M. et al

in Fridlund, Malcolm; Henning, Thomas (Eds.) Towards Other Earths: DARWIN/TPF and the Search for Extrasolar Terrestrial Planets (2003, October 01)

Detailed reference viewed: 1 (0 ULg)
Full Text
See detailCould GENIE detect hot Jupiters?
den Hartog, Roland; Absil, Olivier ULg; Kaltenegger, L. et al

in Fridlund, Malcolm; Henning, Thomas (Eds.) Towards Other Earths: DARWIN/TPF and the Search for Extrasolar Terrestrial Planets (2003, October 01)

The prime objective of GENIE (Ground-based European Nulling Interferometry Experiment) is to obtain experience with the design, construction and operation of an IR nulling interferometer, as a preparation ... [more ▼]

The prime objective of GENIE (Ground-based European Nulling Interferometry Experiment) is to obtain experience with the design, construction and operation of an IR nulling interferometer, as a preparation for the DARWIN/TPF mission. In this context, the detection of a planet orbiting another star would provide an excellent demonstration of nulling interferometry. Doing this through the atmosphere, however, is a formidable task. In this paper we assess the prospects of detecting, with nulling interferometry on ESO's VLT, a Hot Jupiter, a giant planet in a close orbit around its parent star. First we discuss the definition of the optimal target. Then we present a simulated observation of the Tau Bootis system, which suggests that GENIE, in a L'-band single Bracewell configuration, could detect the hot Jupiter in a few hours time with a signal-to-noise ratio of up to ~80. Although there are strong requirements on the control-loop performance, background subtraction and accuracy of the photometry calibration, we conclude that at present there do not seem to be fundamental problems that would prevent GENIE from detecting hot Jupiters. Hence the answer to the question in the title is yes. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 8 (0 ULg)
Full Text
See detailThe Ground-based European Nulling Interferometry Experiment (DARWIN-GENIE)
Gondoin, P.; Absil, Olivier ULg; den Hartog, R. et al

in Fridlund, Malcolm; Henning, Thomas (Eds.) Towards Other Earths: DARWIN/TPF and the Search for Extrasolar Terrestrial Planets (2003, October 01)

Darwin is one of the most challenging space projects ever considered by the European Space Agency (ESA). Its principal objectives are to detect Earth-like planets around nearby stars and to characterise ... [more ▼]

Darwin is one of the most challenging space projects ever considered by the European Space Agency (ESA). Its principal objectives are to detect Earth-like planets around nearby stars and to characterise their atmospheres. Darwin is conceived as a space "nulling interferometer" which makes use of on-axis destructive interferences to extinguish the stellar light while keeping the off-axis signal of the orbiting planet. Within the frame of the Darwin program, the European Space Agency (ESA) and the European Southern Observatory (ESO) intend to build a ground-based technology demonstrator called GENIE (Ground based European Nulling Interferometry Experiment). Such a ground-based demonstrator built around the Very Large Telescope Interferometer (VLTI) in Paranal will test some of the key technologies required for the Darwin Infrared Space Interferometer. It will demonstrate that nulling interferometry can be achieved in a broad mid-IR band as a precursor to the next phase of the Darwin program. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 8 (0 ULg)
Full Text
See detailGENIEsim: the GENIE simulation software
Absil, Olivier ULg; den Hartog, R.; Erd, C. et al

in Fridlund, Malcolm; Henning, Thomas (Eds.) Towards Other Earths: DARWIN/TPF and the Search for Extrasolar Terrestrial Planets (2003, October 01)

GENIEsim, the GENIE simulation software, is an IDL-based code to simulate future observations with the Ground-based European Nulling Interferometer Experiment, which should be commissioned on the Very ... [more ▼]

GENIEsim, the GENIE simulation software, is an IDL-based code to simulate future observations with the Ground-based European Nulling Interferometer Experiment, which should be commissioned on the Very Large Telescope Interferometer (VLTI) in 2007. The code simulates operation in the mid-infrared (L' and N bands) and includes all major noise sources. The atmospheric turbulence is described by a Kolmogorov power spectrum, from which random time series are computed for perturbations to the optical paths. The effect of turbulence is reduced by means of control loops, which are either included in the VLTI facility (MACAO, PRIMA) or specific to the GENIE instrument. The output of GENIEsim is a time series of fluxes computed by integration of a source field multiplied by the GENIE transmission map, projected onto the plane of the sky. Simulations have already allowed to identify critical points in the design of the instrument, such as OPD and dispersion control, calibration of stellar leakage and background subtraction. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 11 (0 ULg)
Full Text
See detailCan GENIE characterize debris disks around nearby stars?
Absil, Olivier ULg; Kaltenegger, L.; Eiroa, C. et al

in Fridlund, Malcolm; Henning, Thomas (Eds.) Towards Other Earths: DARWIN/TPF and the Search for Extrasolar Terrestrial Planets (2003, October 01)

The Ground-based European Nulling Interferometer Experiment will combine the light collected by two or more VLT telescopes and make them interfere in a destructive way, thereby revealing the close ... [more ▼]

The Ground-based European Nulling Interferometer Experiment will combine the light collected by two or more VLT telescopes and make them interfere in a destructive way, thereby revealing the close neighborhood of nearby stars. Operating at mid-infrared wavelengths, GENIE will be particularly sensible to warm circumstellar dust. This paper presents simulated observations of the debris disk around the nearby A2V star zeta Leporis obtained with the GENIE simulation software. Parameters such as inclination, density power-law exponent and inner radius can be retrieved with a relative precision of 1% or better using only six observations of 15 minutes. In the context of the DARWIN/TPF mission, warm circumstellar dust could be a serious limitation to the detection of Earth-like exoplanets. This paper shows that GENIE will detect disks as faint as 23 times our local zodiacal cloud around Sun-like stars at 10 pc, and will thus allow to discard unsuitable targets for DARWIN/TPF. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 12 (0 ULg)
Full Text
See detailDetails on DARWIN and the Search for Extrasolar Planets
Kaltenegger, L.; Fridlund, M.; Absil, Olivier ULg

in Deming, Drake; Seager, Sara (Eds.) Scientific Frontiers in Research on Extrasolar Planets (2003)

The direct detection of an earth-like planet close to its parent star is challenging because the signal detected from the parent star is between 10[SUB]9[/SUB] and 10[SUB]6[/SUB] times brighter than the ... [more ▼]

The direct detection of an earth-like planet close to its parent star is challenging because the signal detected from the parent star is between 10[SUB]9[/SUB] and 10[SUB]6[/SUB] times brighter than the signal of a planet in the visual and infrared (IR), respectively. Future space based missions like DARWIN and TPF concentrate on the region between 6 and 18 microns, a region that contains the carbon dioxide, water, and ozone spectral features of the atmosphere. Using several small collecting telescopes and a beam combiner allows us to build an instrument with an angular resolution normally associated with monolithic telescopes of much larger diameters. The relative positions of the telescopes, forming the interferometer, are selected such that when the optical signals, collected by the individual telescopes, are coherently combined, the small angular distance between the planet and the star can be resolved. Different configurations of the free flying interferometer array influence the performance of the nulling array. The concepts for space nulling interferometers and the influence of different schemes of beam combination on the detected signal are investigated. The contribution of background noise to the detected signal is examined. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 5 (0 ULg)