References of "Joris, Jean"
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See detailA More Than 20% Increase in Deceased-Donor Organ Procurement and Transplantation Activity After the Use of Donation After Circulatory Death.
Le Dinh, H.; MONARD, Josée ULg; DELBOUILLE, Marie-Hélène ULg et al

in Transplantation proceedings (2014), 46(1), 9-13

BACKGROUND: Organ procurement and transplant activity from controlled donation after circulatory death (DCD) was evaluated over an 11-year period to determine whether this program influenced the ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Organ procurement and transplant activity from controlled donation after circulatory death (DCD) was evaluated over an 11-year period to determine whether this program influenced the transplant and donation after brain death (DBD) activities. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Deceased donor (DD) procurement and transplant data were prospectively collected in a local database for retrospective review. RESULTS: There was an increasing trend in the potential and actual DCD numbers over time. DCD accounted for 21.9% of the DD pool over 11 years, representing 23.7% and 24.2% of the DD kidney and liver pool, respectively. The DBD retrieval and transplant activity increased during the same time period. Mean conversion rate turning potential into effective DCD donors was 47.3%. Mean DCD donor age was 54.6 years (range, 3-83). Donors >/=60 years old made up 44.1% of the DCD pool. Among referred donors, reasons for nondonation were medical contraindications (33.7%) and family refusals (19%). Mean organ yield per DCD donor was 2.3 organs. Mean total procurement warm ischemia time was 19.5 minutes (range, 6-39). In 2012, 17 DCD and 37 DBD procurements were performed in the Liege region, which has slightly >1 million inhabitants. CONCLUSIONS: This DCD program implementation enlarged the DD pool and did not compromise the development of DBD programs. The potential DCD pool might be underused and seems to be a valuable organ donor source. [less ▲]

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See detailDoes comfort therapy during controlled donation after circulatory death shorten the life of potential donors?
LEDOUX, Didier ULg; DELBOUILLE, Marie-Hélène ULg; DE ROOVER, Arnaud ULg et al

in Clinical transplantation (2014), 28(1), 47-51

INTRODUCTION: Controlled donation after circulatory death (DCD) remains ethically controversial. The authors developed a controlled DCD protocol in which comfort therapy is regularly used. The aim of this ... [more ▼]

INTRODUCTION: Controlled donation after circulatory death (DCD) remains ethically controversial. The authors developed a controlled DCD protocol in which comfort therapy is regularly used. The aim of this study was to determine whether this policy shortens the DCD donors' life. METHODS: The authors retrospectively analyzed prospectively collected data on patients proposed for DCD at the University Hospital of Liege, Belgium, over a 56-month period. The survival duration of these patients, defined as duration between the time of proposal for DCD and the time of circulatory arrest, was compared between patients who actually donated organs and those who did not. RESULTS: About 128 patients were considered for controlled DCD and 54 (43%) became donors. Among the 74 non-donor patients, 34 (46%) objected to organ donation, 38 patients (51%) were denied by the transplant team for various medical reasons, and two potential DCD donors did not undergo procurement due to logistical and organizational reasons. The survival durations were similar in the DCD donor and non-donor groups. No non-donor patient survived. CONCLUSIONS: Survival of DCD donors is not shortened when compared with non-donor patients. These data support the ethical and respectful approach to potential DCD donors in the authors' center, including regular comfort therapy. [less ▲]

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See detailDonor age as a risk factor in donation after circulatory death liver transplantation in a controlled withdrawal protocol programme.
DETRY, Olivier ULg; DE ROOVER, Arnaud ULg; MEURISSE, Nicolas ULg et al

in The British journal of surgery (2014)

BACKGROUND: Results of donation after circulatory death (DCD) liver transplantation are impaired by graft loss, resulting mainly from non-anastomotic biliary stricture. Donor age is a risk factor in ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Results of donation after circulatory death (DCD) liver transplantation are impaired by graft loss, resulting mainly from non-anastomotic biliary stricture. Donor age is a risk factor in deceased donor liver transplantation, and particularly in DCD liver transplantation. At the authors' institute, age is not an absolute exclusion criterion for discarding DCD liver grafts, DCD donors receive comfort therapy before withdrawal, and cold ischaemia is minimized. METHODS: All consecutive DCD liver transplantations performed from 2003 to 2012 were studied retrospectively. Three age groups were compared in terms of donor and recipient demographics, procurement and transplantation conditions, peak laboratory values during the first post-transplant 72 h, and results at 1 and 3 years. RESULTS: A total of 70 DCD liver transplants were performed, including 32 liver grafts from donors aged 55 years or less, 20 aged 56-69 years, and 18 aged 70 years or more. The overall graft survival rate at 1 month, 1 and 3 years was 99, 91 and 72 per cent respectively, with no graft lost secondary to non-anastomotic stricture. No difference other than age was noted between the three groups for donor or recipient characteristics, or procurement conditions. No primary non-function occurred, but one patient needed retransplantation for artery thrombosis. Biliary complications were similar in the three groups. Graft and patient survival rates were no different at 1 and 3 years between the three groups (P = 0.605). CONCLUSION: Results for DCD liver transplantation from younger and older donors were similar. Donor age above 50 years should not be a contraindication to DCD liver transplantation if other donor risk factors (such as warm and cold ischaemia time) are minimized. [less ▲]

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See detailDONATION AFTER CIRCULATORY DEATH INCREASES THE CADAVERIC DONOR POOL
Le Dinh, H.; DE ROOVER, Arnaud ULg; SQUIFFLET, Jean-Paul ULg et al

in Transplant International (2013, December), 26(S2), 54-101

Background: There is a controversy on the possibility to increase the organ donor pool by donation-after-circulatory-death (DCD) and the possible decrease in donation-after-brain-death (DBD) by DCD ... [more ▼]

Background: There is a controversy on the possibility to increase the organ donor pool by donation-after-circulatory-death (DCD) and the possible decrease in donation-after-brain-death (DBD) by DCD programs. Our aim is to report the DCD experience at the University Hospital of Liege, Belgium, from 2002 through 2012, in a donor region of about 1 million inhabitants. Methods: The prospective organ donor and recipient databases were retrospectively reviewed. Results: 94 and 331 procurements were performed from controlled DCD and DBD donors in the time period, respectively. DCD donors contributed to 22.1% of the deceased donor (DD) organ procurement activity from Jan 2002 to Dec 2012, and up to one-third annually since 2009. DCD liver and kidneys contributed 23.7% and 24.2% of the DD liver and kidney transplantation activity, respectively. There was no decrease of the DBD procurement in the study period. In 2012, overall 54 DD were procured in the Liege region, reaching a high procurement activity.Conclusions: Controlled DCD donors are a valuable source of transplantable liver and kidney grafts, and in our experience do not adversely affect DBD organ procurement activity. [less ▲]

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See detailIS ULTRA-SHORT COLD ISCHEMIA THE KEY TO ISCHEMIC CHOLANGIOPATHY AVOIDANCE IN DCD- LT?
DETRY, Olivier ULg; DE ROOVER, Arnaud ULg; Cheham, Samir et al

in Transplant International (2013, December), 26(S2), 53-98

Introduction: Donation after circulatory death (DCD) donors have been proposed to partially overcome the organ donor shortage. DCD-LT remains controversial, with reported increased risk of ischemic ... [more ▼]

Introduction: Donation after circulatory death (DCD) donors have been proposed to partially overcome the organ donor shortage. DCD-LT remains controversial, with reported increased risk of ischemic cholangiopathy leading to graft loss. The authors retrospectively reviewed a single centre experience with DCD-LT in a 9-year period. Patients and Methods: 70 DCD-LT were performed from 2003 to November 2012. All DCD procedures were performed in operative rooms. Median donor age was 59 years. Most grafts were flushed with HTK solution. Allocation was centre-based. Median total DCD warm ischemia was 19.5 min. Mean follow-up was 36 months. No patient was lost to follow-up. Results: Median MELD score at LT was 15. Median cold ischemia was 235 min. Median peak AST was 1,162 U/L. Median peak bilirubin was 31.2 mg/dL. Patient and graft survivals were 92.8% and 91.3% at one year and 79% and 77.7% at 3 years, respectively. One graft was lost due to hepatic artery thrombosis. No PNF or graft loss due to ischemic cholangiopathy was observed in this series. Causes of death were malignancies in 8 cases. Discussion: In this series, DCD LT appears to provide results equal to classical LT. Short cold ischemia and recipient selection with low MELD score may be the keys to good results in DCD LT, in terms of graft survival and avoidance of ischemic cholangiopathy. [less ▲]

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See detailIs ultra-short cold ischemia the key to ischemic cholangiopathy avoidance in DCD-LT?
DETRY, Olivier ULg; DE ROOVER, Arnaud ULg; Cheham, S et al

in Acta Chirurgica Belgica (2013, May), Supplement 113(3), 6729

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See detailWhat is the potential increase in the heart graft pool by cardiac donation after circulatory death?
Noterdaeme, Timothée; HANS, Marie-France ULg; NELLESSEN, Eric ULg et al

Conference (2013, February 09)

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See detailWhat is the potential increase in the heart graft pool by cardiac donation after circulatory death?
NOTERDAEME, Timothée; DETRY, Olivier ULg; HANS, Marie-France ULg et al

in Transplant International (2013), 26(1), 61-66

Heart transplantation remains the only definite treatment option for end-stage heart diseases. The use of hearts procured after donation after circulatory death (DCD) could help decrease the heart graft ... [more ▼]

Heart transplantation remains the only definite treatment option for end-stage heart diseases. The use of hearts procured after donation after circulatory death (DCD) could help decrease the heart graft shortage. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential increase in heart graft pool by developing DCD heart transplantation. We retrospectively reviewed our local donor database from 2006 to 2011, and screened the complete controlled DCD donor population for potential heart donors, using the same criteria as for donation after brain death (DBD) heart transplantation. Acceptable donation warm ischemic time (DWIT) was limited to 30 min. During this period 177 DBD and 70 DCD were performed. From the 177 DBD, a total of 70 (39.5%) hearts were procured and transplanted. Of the 70 DCD, eight (11%) donors fulfilled the criteria for heart procurement with a DWIT of under 30 min. Within the same period, 82 patients were newly listed for heart transplantation, of which 53 were transplanted, 20 died or were unlisted, and 9 were waiting. It could be estimated that 11% of the DCD might be heart donors, representing a 15% increase in heart transplant activity, as well as potential reduction in the deaths on the waiting list by 40%. [less ▲]

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See detailWhat is the potential increase of the heart graft pool by cardiac donation after circulatory death?
NOTERDAEME, Timothée; NELLESSEN, Eric ULg; HANS, Marie-France ULg et al

in Transplantation (2012, November), 94

Background: Heart transplantation remains to date the only definite treatment option for end-stage heart diseases. Currently only heart procured from brain death (DBD) donors are used. Combined with an ... [more ▼]

Background: Heart transplantation remains to date the only definite treatment option for end-stage heart diseases. Currently only heart procured from brain death (DBD) donors are used. Combined with an increasing demand, the constant heart graft shortage leads to an increase of deaths on cardiac transplantation waiting lists. The use of hearts procured after donation after circulatory death (DCD) could help to partly decrease the heart graft shortage. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential increase of heart graft pool by development of DCD heart transplantation. Methods: The authors retrospectively reviewed their local donor database for the period 2006-2011, and screened the complete controlled DCD donor population for potential heart donors, using the same criteria as for DBD heart transplantation. The acceptable warm ischemic time (WIT) was limited to 30min from life support withdrawal to aortic cannulation. Results: During the analyzed timespan, 177 DBD and 70 DCD were effectively performed. From the 177 DBD, a total of 70 (39.5%) hearts were procured and transplanted locally or in another center. Out of the 70 DCD, 8 (11%) donors fulfilled the criteria for heart graft procurement and had a WIT of less than 30 minutes. During the same period, 82 patients were newly listed for heart transplantation, of which 53 were transplanted, 20 died or were unlisted, and 9 were still awaiting transplantation. Conclusions: Based on our database and a WIT of less than 30min, it could be estimated that 11% of the DCD might be heart graft donors, representing a 11% increase in heart graft procurement, as well as potential reduction of the deaths on the waiting list by 40%. [less ▲]

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See detailDonation after cardio-circulatory death liver transplantation.
Le Dinh; DE ROOVER, Arnaud ULg; KABA, Abdourahmane ULg et al

in World Journal of Gastroenterology (2012), 18(33), 4491-506

The renewed interest in donation after cardio-circulatory death (DCD) started in the 1990s following the limited success of the transplant community to expand the donation after brain-death (DBD) organ ... [more ▼]

The renewed interest in donation after cardio-circulatory death (DCD) started in the 1990s following the limited success of the transplant community to expand the donation after brain-death (DBD) organ supply and following the request of potential DCD families. Since then, DCD organ procurement and transplantation activities have rapidly expanded, particularly for non-vital organs, like kidneys. In liver transplantation (LT), DCD donors are a valuable organ source that helps to decrease the mortality rate on the waiting lists and to increase the availability of organs for transplantation despite a higher risk of early graft dysfunction, more frequent vascular and ischemia-type biliary lesions, higher rates of re-listing and re-transplantation and lower graft survival, which are obviously due to the inevitable warm ischemia occurring during the declaration of death and organ retrieval process. Experimental strategies intervening in both donors and recipients at different phases of the transplantation process have focused on the attenuation of ischemia-reperfusion injury and already gained encouraging results, and some of them have found their way from pre-clinical success into clinical reality. The future of DCD-LT is promising. Concerted efforts should concentrate on the identification of suitable donors (probably Maastricht category III DCD donors), better donor and recipient matching (high risk donors to low risk recipients), use of advanced organ preservation techniques (oxygenated hypothermic machine perfusion, normothermic machine perfusion, venous systemic oxygen persufflation), and pharmacological modulation (probably a multi-factorial biologic modulation strategy) so that DCD liver allografts could be safely utilized and attain equivalent results as DBD-LT. [less ▲]

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See detailWhat is the potential increase of the heart graft pool by cardiac donation after circulatory death?
NOTERDAEME, Timothée; HANS, Marie-France ULg; NELLESSEN, Eric ULg et al

in Acta Chirurgica Belgica (2012, May), 112(3), 668

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See detailBénéfices démontrés et potentiels de l'administration intraveineuse périopératoire de lidocaïne
Giudice, Véronica; LAUWICK, Séverine ULg; KABA, Abdourahmane ULg et al

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2012), 67(2), 81-84

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See detailCardiac paraganglioma : diagnostic work up and review of the literature.
Sooknunden, Marvyn ULg; HAMOIR, Etienne ULg; de Leval, Laurence ULg et al

in Acta Chirurgica Belgica (2012), 112

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See detailDCD liver transplantation: is donor age an issue?
DETRY, Olivier ULg; Le dinh, Hieu; DE ROOVER, Arnaud ULg et al

in Liver Transplantation (2011, July), 17(6S1), 112

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See detailEnd of life care in the operating room for non-heart-beating donors: organization at the University Hospital of Liege.
JORIS, Jean ULg; KABA, Abdourahmane ULg; LAUWICK, Séverine ULg et al

in Transplantation Proceedings (2011), 43(9), 3441-4

Non-heart-beating (NHB) organ donation has become an alternative source to increase organ supply for transplantation. A NHB donation program was implemented in our institution in 2002. As in many ... [more ▼]

Non-heart-beating (NHB) organ donation has become an alternative source to increase organ supply for transplantation. A NHB donation program was implemented in our institution in 2002. As in many institutions the end of life care of the NHB donor (NHBD) is terminated in the operating room (OR) to reduce warm ischemia time. Herein we have described the organization of end of life care for these patients in our institution, including the problems addressed, the solution proposed, and the remaining issues. Emphasis is given to our protocol elaborated with the different contributors of the chain of the NHB donation program. This protocol specifies the information mandatory in the medical records, the end of life care procedure, the determination of death, and the issue of organ preservation measures before NHBD death. The persisting malaise associated with NHB donation reported by OR nurses is finally documented using an anonymous questionnaire. [less ▲]

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See detailRenal transplantation from living related donors: a single center experience in viet nam.
Ledinh, H.; Detry, Olivier ULg; Pham, M. S. et al

in Transplantation Proceedings (2010), 42(10), 4389-91

INTRODUCTION: End-stage renal disease is a major public health problem in Viet Nam. A cooperative project between the University of Liege, Belgium, and the University of Medicine Pham Ngoc Thach, Ho Chi ... [more ▼]

INTRODUCTION: End-stage renal disease is a major public health problem in Viet Nam. A cooperative project between the University of Liege, Belgium, and the University of Medicine Pham Ngoc Thach, Ho Chi Minh City, Viet Nam, has permitted the establishment of an autonomous program of renal transplantation from living-related donors at the Peoples' Hospital No 115. The aim of this paper was to report the primary results of the project and to draw conclusions for the future. PATIENTS AND METHODS: From January 2004 to July 2008, we performed 33 living-related renal transplantations. Mean ages of donors and recipients were 31.8 +/- 9.5 and 41.6 +/- 13.5 years, respectively. Laparoscopic nephrectomy was performed in 6 donors. The immunosuppressive regimen consisted of three drugs associated with induction therapy using anti-interleukin-2 receptor monoclonal antibody. RESULTS: The 33 donors are in good health at follow-up. Four developed major intra- or postoperative hemorrhage necessitating transfusion, with a surgical re-exploration in 1 donor. Wound infection occurred in 2 donors. Posttransplant recipient and graft survivals at 1 versus 3 years were 82% and 73% versus 82% and 65%, respectively. Eight recipients presented 13 biopsy-proven acute rejection episodes that were reversible in 7, but 1 patient lost his graft due to an irreversible rejection. Two recipients developed cancer. CONCLUSIONS: These initial results have encouraged us to continue the program of renal transplantation from living-related donors. However, they also pointed out the need to develop other donor sources. [less ▲]

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See detailContribution of donors after cardiac death to the deceased donor pool: 2002 to 2009 university of liege experience.
Ledinh, H.; Meurisse, Nicolas ULg; Delbouille, Michèle ULg et al

in Transplantation Proceedings (2010), 42(10), 4369-72

OBJECTIVE: In this study, we have evaluated the organ procurement and transplantation activity from donors after cardiac death (DCD) at our institution over an 8-year period. Our aim was to determine ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVE: In this study, we have evaluated the organ procurement and transplantation activity from donors after cardiac death (DCD) at our institution over an 8-year period. Our aim was to determine whether this program influenced transplantation programs, or donation after brain death (DBD) activity. METHODS: We prospectively collected our procurement and transplantation statistics in a database for retrospective review. RESULTS: We observed an increasing trend in potential and actual DCD number. The mean conversion rate turning potential into effective donors was 58.1%. DCD accounted for 16.6% of the deceased donor (DD) pool over 8 years. The mean age for effective DCD donors was 53.9 years (range, 3-79). Among the effective donors, 63.3% (n = 31) came from the transplant center and 36.7% (n = 18) were referred from collaborative hospitals. All donors were Maastricht III category. The number of kidney and liver transplants using DCD sources tended to increase. DCD kidney transplants represented 10.8% of the DD kidney pool and DCD liver transplants made up 13.9% of the DD liver pool over 8 years. The DBD program activity increased in the same time period. In 2009, 17 DCD and 33 DBD procurements were performed in a region with a little >1 million inhabitants. CONCLUSION: The establishment of a DCD program in our institution enlarged the donor pool and did not compromise the development of the DBD program. In our experience, DCD are a valuable source for abdominal organ transplantation. [less ▲]

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