References of "Joos, G"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detail(Ex-)smoking asthma patients in general and specialized Belgian practice.
Decramer, M.; Louis, Renaud ULg; Joos, G. et al

in Respiratory medicine (2011), 105(8), 1203-1210

INTRODUCTION: Smokers are often excluded from asthma studies. In the present study, data are presented on the prevalence, characteristics and management approach of this patient population in the Belgian ... [more ▼]

INTRODUCTION: Smokers are often excluded from asthma studies. In the present study, data are presented on the prevalence, characteristics and management approach of this patient population in the Belgian practice both at the level of general practitioners (GPs) and specialists. MATERIALS AND METHODS: One hundred and nineteen smoking, non-smoking and ex-smoking patients (25-65 yrs) with asthma, COPD or both, were recruited by 33 GPs and 33 specialists. Data were obtained retrospectively from medical records. However, only a small number of files were complete. RESULTS: The majority of COPD patients were (ex-)smokers: 94% in the specialist group, 78% in the GP group. Cardiovascular comorbidity appeared in both groups in the same frequency order: COPD>(ex-)smoking patients with asthma (AS)>non-smoking patients with asthma (ANS), with a significant difference between AS and ANS in the specialist population. Chronic cough during more than 3 months in two consecutive years was reported in 97% of COPD patients, in 71% of the AS patients and in only 25% of the ANS patients. The type of cough differed between AS and ANS in the GP group, with a higher prevalence of productive cough in the former. Treatment patterns observed were as expected according to diagnosis except for a disproportionate use of Tiotropium in AS in the GP group. CONCLUSION: AS were somewhere in between COPD patients and ANS for a large number of the characteristics studied, suggesting that they are an intermediate phenotype between COPD and asthma. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 26 (16 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailThe impact of concomitant rhinitis on asthma-related quality of life and asthma control.
Vandenplas, O.; Dramaix, M.; Joos, G. et al

in Allergy (2010)

To cite this article: Vandenplas O, Dramaix M, Joos G, Louis R, Michils A, Verleden G, Vincken W, Vints A-M, Herbots E, Bachert C. The impact of concomitant rhinitis on asthma-related quality of life and ... [more ▼]

To cite this article: Vandenplas O, Dramaix M, Joos G, Louis R, Michils A, Verleden G, Vincken W, Vints A-M, Herbots E, Bachert C. The impact of concomitant rhinitis on asthma-related quality of life and asthma control. Allergy 2010; DOI: 10.1111/j.1398-9995.2010.02365.x. Abstract Background: Characterizing the interactions between the upper and lower airways is important for the management of asthma. This study aimed at assessing the specific impact of concomitant rhinitis on asthma-related quality of life (QOL) and asthma control. Methods: A cross-sectional, observational survey was conducted among 1173 patients with asthma (aged 12-45) recruited by general practitioners and chest physicians. AR was defined by self-reported rhinitis symptoms and previously documented sensitization to inhalant allergens. The primary outcomes were (1) asthma control assessed by the Asthma Control Questionnaire (ACQ) and (2) asthma-specific QOL evaluated through the Mini Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire (mAQLQ). Results: AR was present in 73.9% of the population with asthma and nonallergic rhinitis (NAR) in 13.6%. AR and NAR were associated with an increased risk of uncontrolled asthma (i.e. ACQ score > 1.5) with adjusted odds ratios (OR) of 2.00 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.35-2.97) and 1.77 (95%CI: 1.09-2.89), respectively. Multivariate linear regression analysis showed that AR and NAR had a modest, although significant, negative impact on the global mAQLQ score (beta coefficient: -0.293, standard error [SE]: 0.063 and beta coefficient: -0.221, SE: 0.080, P < 0.001, respectively), even after adjustment for the level of asthma control and demographic characteristics. Conclusion: This survey provides direct evidence that AR and NAR are associated with an incremental adverse impact on the disease-specific QOL of patients with asthma and the level of asthma control. Further investigations are required to determine whether appropriate treatment of rhinitis would efficiently reduce asthma morbidity. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 28 (3 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailA comparison of budesonide/formoterol maintenance and reliever therapy vs. conventional best practice in asthma management.
Louis, Renaud ULg; Joos, G.; Michils, A. et al

in International Journal of Clinical Practice (2009), 63(10), 1479-88

OBJECTIVE: To study the effectiveness and safety of budesonide/formoterol (Symbicort) Maintenance And Reliever Therapy (Symbicort SMART, AstraZeneca, Sodertalje, Sweden), a simplified management approach ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVE: To study the effectiveness and safety of budesonide/formoterol (Symbicort) Maintenance And Reliever Therapy (Symbicort SMART, AstraZeneca, Sodertalje, Sweden), a simplified management approach with one inhaler compared with conventional best practice (CBP) with multiple inhalers in patients with persistent asthma. DESIGN: Open-label randomised controlled parallel group trial, 6-month treatment. PARTICIPANTS: A total of 908 patients > or = 12 years of age, with persistent asthma receiving treatment with inhaled corticosteroids (ICS), either alone or in conjunction with long-acting beta(2)-agonist. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Time to first severe asthma exacerbation and number of severe asthma exacerbations. RESULTS: No difference between groups was seen in time to first severe exacerbation (p = 0.75). Exacerbation rates were low in both groups. A total of 12 patients in the Symbicort SMART group experienced a total of 14 severe asthma exacerbations, and 19 patients in the CBP group experienced a total of 25 severe asthma exacerbations (annual rate 0.07 vs. 0.13 p = 0.09). The mean daily dose of ICS expressed in BDP equivalent was significantly lower in the Symbicort SMART group (including as-needed use) vs. in the CBP group (749 microg vs. 1059 microg; p < 0.0001). Mean scores in Asthma Control Questionnaire, 5 question version improved significantly in the SMART group compared with the CBP group (p = 0.0026). Symbicort SMART and CBP were equally well tolerated. The mean drug cost/patient/month was significantly lower for the patients in the Symbicort SMART group compared with patients receiving CBP (51.3 euros vs. 66.5 euros; p < 0.0001). CONCLUSIONS: In Belgian patients, a simplified regimen using budesonide/formoterol maintenance and reliever therapy was at least as effective at improving clinical control compared with CBP with a significantly lower ICS dose and significantly lower drug costs. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 24 (2 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailThe triple neurokinin-receptor antagonist CS-003 inhibits neurokinin A-induced bronchoconstriction in patients with asthma
Schelfhout, V.; Louis, Renaud ULg; Lenz, W. et al

in Pulmonary Pharmacology & therapeutics (2006), 19(6), 413-418

Neurokinin A (NKA) causes bronchoconstriction in asthmatic patients. In vitro both NK1 and NK2 receptors can mediate airway contraction. Moreover in guinea pigs, NK3 receptors facilitate cholinergic ... [more ▼]

Neurokinin A (NKA) causes bronchoconstriction in asthmatic patients. In vitro both NK1 and NK2 receptors can mediate airway contraction. Moreover in guinea pigs, NK3 receptors facilitate cholinergic neurotransmission. Dual tachykinin NK1/NK2 receptor antagonism results in prevention of NKA-induced bronchoconstriction. We have now examined the effect of a single dose of the triple tachykinin receptor antagonist CS-003 on NKA-induced bronchoconstriction in asthmatics. A double blind, crossover, placebo-controlled trial in 16 mild asthmatics was performed. One single dose of CS-003 (200 mg, solution in distilled water) or matched placebo was given orally on the assessment days. NKA-provocation tests were performed pre-dose and 1, 8 and 24h after dosing. There was a significant shift to the right of the dose-response curve at 1 and 8 h after intake of CS-003. PC20 was not reached in 12/16 patients at 1 h post-dose and in 5/16 patients at 8h post-dose. This did not occur under placebo treatment. A single dose of 200 mg CS-003 protected significantly against NKA-induced bronchoconstriction at 1 and 8 h post-dose in mild asthmatics. (c) 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 26 (1 ULg)