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See detailAntiplasmodial Alkaloids from the Stem Bark of Strychnos malacoclados.
Tchinda Tiabou, Alembert ULg; Ngono, A. R.; Tamze, V. et al

in Planta Medica (2012), 78

From the stem bark of STRYCHNOS MALACOCLADOS, one new bisindole alkaloid, 3-hydroxylongicaudatine Y ( 1), was isolated along with the known alkaloids vomicine ( 2), bisnordihydrotoxiferine ( 3), divarine ... [more ▼]

From the stem bark of STRYCHNOS MALACOCLADOS, one new bisindole alkaloid, 3-hydroxylongicaudatine Y ( 1), was isolated along with the known alkaloids vomicine ( 2), bisnordihydrotoxiferine ( 3), divarine ( 4), longicaudatine ( 5), longicaudatine Y ( 6), and longicaudatine F ( 7). All the compounds were tested for their antimalarial activity against the chloroquine-sensitive 3D7 and -resistant W2 strains of PLASMODIUM FALCIPARUM. Longicaudatine was the most active compound with IC (50) values of 0.682 and 0.573 microM, respectively. The activity of compounds 1, 3, 4, 6, and 7 against the two strains ranged from 1.191 to 6.220 microM and 0.573 to 21.848 microM, respectively. Vomicine ( 2), the only monomer isolated, was inactive. The alkaloids of the longicaudatine-type ( 1, 5- 7) were more active than those of the caracurine-type ( 3- 4). The presence of the ether bridge in the molecule seems to increase the antiplasmodial activity. Compounds 1, 5, and 7 were tested against the WI-38 human fibroblast cell line. Longicaudatine was the most cytotoxic compound with an IC (50) of 2.721 microM. Longicaudatine F was 40-46 times more active against the two strains of P. FALCIPARUM than against the human fibroblasts and was thus considered as the more selective alkaloid. The structures of the compounds were determined based on the analysis of their spectral data. [less ▲]

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See detailAntiplasmodial, anti-inflammatory and cytotoxic activities of various plant extracts from the Mascarene Archipelago.
Jonville, Marie ULg; Kodja, H.; Strasberg, D. et al

in Journal of Ethnopharmacology (2011), 136

AIM OF THE STUDY: Antiplasmodial activity, inhibition of nitric oxide (NO) overproduction, and anti-proliferative activity were investigated in vitro to evaluate the bioactive potential of the traditional ... [more ▼]

AIM OF THE STUDY: Antiplasmodial activity, inhibition of nitric oxide (NO) overproduction, and anti-proliferative activity were investigated in vitro to evaluate the bioactive potential of the traditional pharmacopoeia of the Mascarene Archipelago, which is known for its biodiversity and for the richness of its endemic flora. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 45 methanol (MeOH) and dichloromethane (DCM) extracts were prepared from 19 plant species collected on Reunion and Mauritius Islands. Ninety-six-well microplate assays were performed on chloroquine sensitive Plasmodium falciparum 3D7 strain, on LPS-stimulated Raw 264.7 murine macrophages and on A-549, DLD-1 and WS1 human cells. Activity was evaluated through spectrophotometric methods. RESULTS: Activity was attributed to plant extracts expressing IC(50)<50mug/ml for antiplasmodial response, IC(50)<100mug/ml for cytotoxicity, and IC(50)<130mug/ml for anti-inflammatory reaction. The majority of the extracts tested (69%) exhibited potency in at least one of these three types of activity. This is the first report describing promising antiplasmodial activity (IC(50)<15mug/ml) for Psiadia dentata DCM extract and Terminalia bentzoe MeOH bark extract. NO inhibition assay revealed seven interesting plants, described for the first time as anti-inflammatory: Aphloia theiformis, Buddleja salviifolia, Eupatorium riparium, Hiptage benghalensis, Psiadia arguta, Psiadia dentata, and Scutia commersonii. Finally, anti-proliferative activity was observed for two endemic species, Geniostoma borbonicum and Nuxia verticillata. CONCLUSION: Using the criterion of endemism as part of the criteria for traditional medicinal use raises the chances of finding original active principles. In our case, 86% of the endemic plants tested displayed pharmacological interest. [less ▲]

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See detailNew strategy to in vitro evaluation of antimalarial drugs demonstre advantage of Artemisia annua crude extract on antimalarial effect by its tools to cross intestinal barrier
Melilo de Magalhaes, Pedro; Schneider, Y. J.; Dupont, Isabelle et al

Poster (2010, October 03)

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See detailAnti-inflammatory potency of the traditionally used antimalarial plant Fagraea fragrans
Jonville, Marie ULg; Baghdikian, Béatrice; Ollivier, Evelyne et al

in Planta Medica (2010, September), 76(12), 1171

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See detailIn vitro antiplasmodial activity of plants used in Benin in traditional medicine to treat malaria
Bero, Joanne; Ganfon, Habib; Jonville, Marie ULg et al

in Journal of Ethnopharmacology (2009), 122

Aim of the study: The aim of the studywas to evaluate the in vitro antiplasmodial activity of crude extracts of 12 plant species traditionally used in Benin for the treatment of malaria in order to ... [more ▼]

Aim of the study: The aim of the studywas to evaluate the in vitro antiplasmodial activity of crude extracts of 12 plant species traditionally used in Benin for the treatment of malaria in order to validate their use. Materials and methods: For each species, dichloromethane, methanol and total aqueous extracts were tested. The antiplasmodial activity of extracts was evaluated using the measurement of the plasmodial lactate dehydrogenase activity on chloroquine-sensitive (3D7) and resistant (W2) strains of Plasmodium falciparum. The selectivity of the different extractswas evaluated using the MTT test on J774 macrophagelike murine cells and WI38 human normal fibroblasts. Results: The best growth inhibition of both strains of Plasmodium falciparum was observed with the dichloromethane extracts of Acanthospermum hispidum DC. (Asteraceae) (IC50 =7.5 g/ml on 3D7 and 4.8 g/ml on W2), Keetia leucantha (K. Krause) Bridson (syn. Plectronia leucantha Krause) (Rubiaceae) leaves and twigs (IC50 = 13.8 and 11.3 g/ml on 3D7 and IC50 = 26.5 and 15.8 g/ml on W2, respectively), Carpolobia lutea G.Don. (Polygalaceae) (IC50 = 19.4 g/ml on 3D7 and 8.1 g/ml on W2) and Strychnos spinosa Lam. (Loganiaceae) leaves (IC50 = 15.6 g/ml on 3D7 and 8.9 g/ml on W2). All these extracts had a low cytotoxicity. Conclusion: Our study gives some justifications for the traditional uses of some investigated plants. [less ▲]

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See detailFagraldehyde, a Secoiridoid Isolated from Fagraea fragrans
Jonville, Marie ULg; Capel, Marie; Frederich, Michel ULg et al

in Journal of Natural Products (2008), 71(12), 2038-2040

A secoiridoid aglycone with atypical skeleton, named fagraldehyde (1), together with several known secoiridoids (gentiopicroside (2), sweroside (3) and swertiamarin (4)) were isolated from the bark and ... [more ▼]

A secoiridoid aglycone with atypical skeleton, named fagraldehyde (1), together with several known secoiridoids (gentiopicroside (2), sweroside (3) and swertiamarin (4)) were isolated from the bark and leaves of Fagraea fragrans collected in Cambodia. The conformations of 1 were evaluated on the basis of molecular modeling and NOESY correlations. A hypothetical biogenesis of fagraldehyde was proposed to explain the unusual skeleton. Compound 1 was weakly active in vitro against Plasmodium falciparum. [less ▲]

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See detailEvaluation of medicinal plants from Reunion Island for antimalarial and cytotoxic activities
Jonville, Marie ULg; Kodja, H.; Humeau, L. et al

in Planta Medica (2008), 74(9), 1002-1002

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See detailIn vitro antiplasmodial activity of ethnobotanically selected plants from Burkina Faso
Jansen, Olivia ULg; Angenot, Luc ULg; Tits, Monique ULg et al

in Planta Medica (2008), 74(9), 1142-1142

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See detailAntiplasmodial and antitrypanosomal activity of Triclisia sacleuxii (Pierre) Diels
Murebwayire, Sangabo; Frederich, Michel ULg; Hannaert, V. et al

in Phytomedicine : International Journal of Phytotherapy and Phytopharmacology (2008), 15(9), 728-733

The antiplasmodial and antitrypanosomal activities of Triclisia sacleuxii (Pierre) Diels were investigated on three Plasmodium falciparum strains [FcB1, 3D7 (chloroquine – sensitive) and W2 (chloroquine – ... [more ▼]

The antiplasmodial and antitrypanosomal activities of Triclisia sacleuxii (Pierre) Diels were investigated on three Plasmodium falciparum strains [FcB1, 3D7 (chloroquine – sensitive) and W2 (chloroquine – resistant) strains] and on Trypanosoma brucei Tbsf 221. Roots, stems and leaves ethanolic extracts as well as crude tertiary and quaternary alkaloids fractions were considered. Whereas the ethanolic extracts and quaternary crude alkaloids fractions exhibited no significant activity, the roots and stems tertiary alkaloid fractions revealed interesting growth inhibition against the Plasmodium FcB1 and Trypanosoma Tbsf 221 strains. The IC50 were 1.04 and 0.89 g/ml (roots), 2.50 and 0.91 g/ml (stems), respectively. The leaves tertiary alkaloids fraction also showed a promising antitrypanosomal activity (IC50 : 1.85 g/ml). Phytochemical analysis of the roots tertiary alkaloids fraction yielded four major compounds, phaeanthine, N-methylapateline, 1,2-dehydroapateline and 1,2-dehydrotelobine, which were identified on the basis of their spectroscopic data. The four compounds displayed (in vitro) antitrypanosomal activity with IC50 of 2.68, 1.19, 1.06 and 1.11 µM, respectively. They also demonstrated antiplasmodial activity on Plasmodium falciparum 3D7, with IC50 of 1.72, 0.93, 1.39 and 12.4 µM respectively and on the chloroquine – resistant W2 with IC50 of 0.35, 1.10, 1.63, 1.52 µM. [less ▲]

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See detailScreening of medicinal plants from Reunion Island for antimalarial and cytotoxic activity.
Jonville, Marie ULg; Kodja, H.; Humeau, L. et al

in Journal of Ethnopharmacology (2008), 120(3), 382-6

AIM OF THE STUDY: Nine plants from Reunion Island, selected using ethnopharmacology and chemotaxonomy, were investigated for their potential antimalarial value. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Thirty-eight ... [more ▼]

AIM OF THE STUDY: Nine plants from Reunion Island, selected using ethnopharmacology and chemotaxonomy, were investigated for their potential antimalarial value. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Thirty-eight extracts were prepared by maceration using CH(2)Cl(2) and MeOH, and were tested for in vitro activity against the 3D7 and W2 strain of Plasmodium falciparum. The most active extracts were then tested for in vitro cytotoxicity on human WI-38 fibroblasts to determine the selectivity index. Those extracts were also investigated in vivo against Plasmodium berghei infected mice. RESULTS: Most active of the extracts tested were the dichloromethane leaves extracts of Nuxia verticillata Lam. (Buddlejaceae), Psiadia arguta Voigt. (Asteraceae), Lantana camara L. (Verbenaceae), the methanol extracts from Aphloia theiformis (Vahl) Benn. (Aphloiaceae) bark, and Terminalia bentzoe L. (Combretaceae) leaves displaying in vitro IC(50) values ranging from 5.7 to 14.1mug/ml. Extracts from Psiadia, Aphloia at 200mg/(kgday) and Teminalia at 50mg/(kgday) also exhibited significant (p<0.0005) parasite inhibition in mice: 75.5%, 65.6% and 83.5%, respectively. CONCLUSION: Two plants showed interesting antimalarial activity with good selectivity: Aphloia theiformis and Terminalia bentzoe. Nuxia verticillata still needs to be tested in vivo, with a new batch of plant material. [less ▲]

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See detailApproche ethnopharmacologique de plantes utilisées en médecine traditionnelle au Cambodge dans le traitement des maladies infectieuses, des fièvres et du paludisme
Cheng, S. K.; Chea, Aun; Hout, Sothera et al

in Ethnopharmacologia (2007), 40

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See detailIn vitro antimicrobial activity of plants used in Cambodian traditional medicine
Chea, Aun; Jonville, Marie ULg; Bun, Sok-Siya et al

in American Journal of Chinese Medicine (The) (2007), 35(5), 867-873

The purpose of the present study was to screen 27 plant species used in the traditional medicine of Cambodia for in vitro antibacterial and antifungal activities. Thirty-three methanolic extracts were ... [more ▼]

The purpose of the present study was to screen 27 plant species used in the traditional medicine of Cambodia for in vitro antibacterial and antifungal activities. Thirty-three methanolic extracts were tested against Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Mycobacterium smegmatis and Candida albicans. Screened by disk diffusion assay, the extracts showed antimicrobial activity especially on Gram-positive bacteria. None of the crude methanolic extracts showed activity against P. aeruginosa. Twenty-five selected extracts were evaluated using a micro-dilution test. Harrisonia perforata (roots) and Hymenodictyon excelsum (bark) exhibited a bactericidal effect against S. aureus at a concentration of 500 μg/ml. Azadirachta indica (bark), Harrisonia perforata (roots and stem) and Shorea obtusa (roots) exhibited a bactericidal effect against M. smegmatis at 250 μg/ml. [less ▲]

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