References of "Jones, N"
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See detailInterdisciplinary approaches to the phenomenology of auditory verbal hallucinations
Woods, A; Jones, N; Bernini, M et al

in Schizophrenia Bulletin (2014), 40

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See detailGround-based remote sensing of tropospheric water vapour isotopologues within the project MUSICA
Schneider, M.; Barthlott, S.; Hase, F. et al

in Atmospheric Measurement Techniques (2012), 5(2012), 3007-3027

Within the project MUSICA (MUlti-platform remote Sensing of Isotopologues for investigating the Cycle of Atmospheric water), long-term tropospheric water vapour isotopologue data records are provided for ... [more ▼]

Within the project MUSICA (MUlti-platform remote Sensing of Isotopologues for investigating the Cycle of Atmospheric water), long-term tropospheric water vapour isotopologue data records are provided for ten globally distributed ground-based mid-infrared remote sensing stations of the NDACC (Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change). We present a new method allowing for an extensive and straightforward characterisation of the complex nature of such isotopologue remote sensing datasets. We demonstrate that the MUSICA humidity profiles are representative for most of the troposphere with a vertical resolution ranging from about 2 km (in the lower troposphere) to 8 km (in the upper troposphere) and with an estimated precision of better than 10%. We find that the sensitivity with respect to the isotopologue composition is limited to the lower and middle troposphere, whereby we estimate a precision of about 30‰ for the ratio between the two isotopologues HD16O and H216O. The measurement noise, the applied atmospheric temperature profiles, the uncertainty in the spectral baseline, and the cross-dependence on humidity are the leading error sources. We introduce an a posteriori correction method of the cross-dependence on humidity, and we recommend applying it to isotopologue ratio remote sensing datasets in general. In addition, we present mid-infrared CO2 retrievals and use them for demonstrating the MUSICA network-wide data consistency. In order to indicate the potential of long-term isotopologue remote sensing data if provided with a well-documented quality, we present a climatology and compare it to simulations of an isotope incorporated AGCM (Atmospheric General Circulation Model). We identify differences in the multi-year mean and seasonal cycles that significantly exceed the estimated errors, thereby indicating deficits in the modeled atmospheric water cycle. [less ▲]

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See detailValidation of IASI FORLI carbon monoxide retrievals using FTIR data from NDACC
Kerzenmacher, T; Dils, B; Kumps, N et al

in Atmospheric Measurement Techniques (2012), 5

Carbon monoxide (CO) is retrieved daily and globally from space-borne IASI radiance spectra using the Fast Optimal Retrievals on Layers for IASI (FORLI) software developed at the Université Libre de ... [more ▼]

Carbon monoxide (CO) is retrieved daily and globally from space-borne IASI radiance spectra using the Fast Optimal Retrievals on Layers for IASI (FORLI) software developed at the Université Libre de Bruxelles (ULB). The IASI CO total column product for 2008 from the most recent FORLI retrieval version (20100815) is evaluated using correlative CO profile products retrieved from groundbased solar absorption Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) observations at the following FTIR spectrometer sites from the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC): Ny-Alesund, Kiruna, Bremen, Jungfraujoch, Izana and Wollongong. In order to have good statistics for the comparisons, we included all IASI data from the same day, within a 100 km radius around the ground-based stations. The individual ground-based data were adjusted to the lowest altitude of the co-located IASI CO profiles. To account for the different vertical resolutions and sensitivities of the ground-based and satellite measurements, the averaging kernels associated with the various retrieved products have been used to properly smooth coincident data products. It has been found that the IASI CO total column products compare well on average with the co-located ground-based FTIR total columns at the selected NDACC sites and that there is no significant bias for the mean values at all stations. [less ▲]

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See detailValidation of version-4.61 methane and nitrous oxide observed by MIPAS
Payan, S.; Camy-Peyret, C.; Oelhaf, H. et al

in Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (2009), 9(2), 413-442

The ENVISAT validation programme for the atmospheric instruments MIPAS, SCIAMACHY and GOMOS is based on a number of balloon-borne, aircraft, satellite and ground-based correlative measurements. In ... [more ▼]

The ENVISAT validation programme for the atmospheric instruments MIPAS, SCIAMACHY and GOMOS is based on a number of balloon-borne, aircraft, satellite and ground-based correlative measurements. In particular the activities of validation scientists were coordinated by ESA within the ENVISAT Stratospheric Aircraft and Balloon Campaign or ESABC. As part of a series of similar papers on other species [this issue] and in parallel to the contribution of the individual validation teams, the present paper provides a synthesis of comparisons performed between MIPAS CH4 and N2O profiles produced by the current ESA operational software (Instrument Processing Facility version 4.61 or IPF v4.61, full resolution MIPAS data covering the period 9 July 2002 to 26 March 2004) and correlative measurements obtained from balloon and aircraft experiments as well as from satellite sensors or from ground-based instruments. In the middle stratosphere, no significant bias is observed between MIPAS and correlative measurements, and MIPAS is providing a very consistent and global picture of the distribution of CH4 and N2O in this region. In average, the MIPAS CH4 values show a small positive bias in the lower stratosphere of about 5%. A similar situation is observed for N2O with a positive bias of 4%. In the lower stratosphere/upper troposphere (UT/LS) the individual used MIPAS data version 4.61 still exhibits some unphysical oscillations in individual CH4 and N2O profiles caused by the processing algorithm (with almost no regularization). Taking these problems into account, the MIPAS CH4 and N2O profiles are behaving as expected from the internal error estimation of IPF v4.61 and the estimated errors of the correlative measurements. [less ▲]

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See detailGeophysical validation of MIPAS-ENVISAT operational ozone data
Cortesi, U.; Lambert, J. C.; De Clercq, C. et al

in Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (2007), 7(18), 4807-4867

The Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS), on-board the European ENVIronmental SATellite (ENVISAT) launched on 1 March 2002, is a middle infrared Fourier Transform spectrometer ... [more ▼]

The Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS), on-board the European ENVIronmental SATellite (ENVISAT) launched on 1 March 2002, is a middle infrared Fourier Transform spectrometer measuring the atmospheric emission spectrum in limb sounding geometry. The instrument is capable to retrieve the vertical distribution of temperature and trace gases, aiming at the study of climate and atmospheric chemistry and dynamics, and at applications to data assimilation and weather forecasting. MIPAS operated in its standard observation mode for approximately two years, from July 2002 to March 2004, with scans performed at nominal spectral resolution of 0.025 cm(-1) and covering the altitude range from the mesosphere to the upper troposphere with relatively high vertical resolution (about 3 km in the stratosphere). Only reduced spectral resolution measurements have been performed subsequently. MIPAS data were re-processed by ESA using updated versions of the Instrument Processing Facility (IPF v4.61 and v4.62) and provided a complete set of level-2 operational products (geo-located vertical profiles of temperature and volume mixing ratio of H2O, O-3, HNO3, CH4, N2O and NO2) with quasi continuous and global coverage in the period of MIPAS full spectral resolution mission. In this paper, we report a detailed description of the validation of MIPAS-ENVISAT operational ozone data, that was based on the comparison between MIPAS v4.61 (and, to a lesser extent, v4.62) O-3 VMR profiles and a comprehensive set of correlative data, including observations from ozone sondes, ground-based lidar, FTIR and microwave radiometers, remote-sensing and in situ instruments on-board stratospheric aircraft and balloons, concurrent satellite sensors and ozone fields assimilated by the European Center for Medium-range Weather Forecasting. A coordinated effort was carried out, using common criteria for the selection of individual validation data sets, and similar methods for the comparisons. This enabled merging the individual results from a variety of independent reference measurements of proven quality (i.e. well characterized error budget) into an overall evaluation of MIPAS O-3 data quality, having both statistical strength and the widest spatial and temporal coverage. Collocated measurements from ozone sondes and ground-based lidar and microwave radiometers of the Network for the Detection Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC) were selected to carry out comparisons with time series of MIPAS O-3 partial columns and to identify groups of stations and time periods with a uniform pattern of ozone differences, that were subsequently used for a vertically resolved statistical analysis. The results of the comparison are classified according to synoptic and regional systems and to altitude intervals, showing a generally good agreement within the comparison error bars in the upper and middle stratosphere. Significant differences emerge in the lower stratosphere and are only partly explained by the larger contributions of horizontal and vertical smoothing differences and of collocation errors to the total uncertainty. Further results obtained from a purely statistical analysis of the same data set from NDACC ground-based lidar stations, as well as from additional ozone soundings at middle latitudes and from NDACC ground-based FTIR measurements, confirm the validity of MIPAS O-3 profiles down to the lower stratosphere, with evidence of larger discrepancies at the lowest altitudes. The validation against O-3 VMR profiles using collocated observations performed by other satellite sensors (SAGE II, POAM III, ODIN-SMR, ACE-FTS, HALOE, GOME) and ECMWF assimilated ozone fields leads to consistent results, that are to a great extent compatible with those obtained from the comparison with ground-based measurements. Excellent agreement in the full vertical range of the comparison is shown with respect to collocated ozone data from stratospheric aircraft and balloon instruments, that was mostly obtained in very good spatial and temporal coincidence with MIPAS scans. This might suggest that the larger differences observed in the upper troposphere and lowermost stratosphere with respect to collocated ground-based and satellite O-3 data are only partly due to a degradation of MIPAS data quality. They should be rather largely ascribed to the natural variability of these altitude regions and to other components of the comparison errors. By combining the results of this large number of validation data sets we derived a general assessment of MIPAS v4.61 and v4.62 ozone data quality. A clear indication of the validity of MIPAS O-3 vertical profiles is obtained for most of the stratosphere, where the mean relative difference with the individual correlative data sets is always lower than +/- 10%. Furthermore, these differences always fall within the combined systematic error (from 1 hPa to 50 hPa) and the standard deviation is fully consistent with the random error of the comparison (from 1 hPa to similar to 30-40 hPa). A degradation in the quality of the agreement is generally observed in the lower stratosphere and upper troposphere, with biases up to 25% at 100 hPa and standard deviation of the global mean differences up to three times larger than the combined random error in the range 50-100 hPa. The larger differences observed at the bottom end of MIPAS retrieved profiles can be associated, as already noticed, to the effects of stronger atmospheric gradients in the UTLS that are perceived differently by the various measurement techniques. However, further components that may degrade the results of the comparison at lower altitudes can be identified as potentially including cloud contamination, which is likely not to have been fully filtered using the current settings of the MIPAS cloud detection algorithm, and in the linear approximation of the forward model that was used for the a priori estimate of systematic error components. The latter, when affecting systematic contributions with a random variability over the spatial and temporal scales of global averages, might result in an underestimation of the random error of the comparison and add up to other error sources, such as the possible underestimates of the p and T error propagation based on the assumption of a 1 K and 2% uncertainties, respectively, on MIPAS temperature and pressure retrievals. At pressure lower than 1 hPa, only a small fraction of the selected validation data set provides correlative ozone data of adequate quality and it is difficult to derive quantitative conclusions about the performance of MIPAS O-3 retrieval for the topmost layers. [less ▲]

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See detailIntercomparisons of MIPAS operational N2O and HNO3 profiles with ground based FTIR data
Vigouroux, C.; De Mazière, M.; Wood, S. et al

Poster (2004, July)

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See detailComparisons between SCIAMACHY Scientific Products and Ground-Based FTIR Data for Total Columns of CO, CH4 and N2O
De Mazière, M.; Barret, B.; Blumenstock, T. et al

Scientific conference (2004, May)

Total column amounts of CO, CH4 and N2O retrieved from SCIAMACHY nadir observations in its near-infrared channels have been compared to data from a ground-based network of Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR ... [more ▼]

Total column amounts of CO, CH4 and N2O retrieved from SCIAMACHY nadir observations in its near-infrared channels have been compared to data from a ground-based network of Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometers as well as to data obtained with an FTIR instrument during a ship cruise in January-February 2003, along the African West Coast. The SCIAMACHY data considered here have been produced by two different scientific retrieval algorithms, wfm-doas (version 4.0) and IMLM (version 5.1), and cover different time periods, making the number of reliable coincidences that satisfy the temporal and spatial collocation criteria rather limited and different for both. Also the quality of the SCIAMACHY Level 1 data, and thus of the Level 2 data for the different time periods is very different. Still the comparisons demonstrate the capability of SCIAMACHY, using one of both algorithms, to deliver geophysically valuable products for the target species under consideration, on a global scale. [less ▲]

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See detailVALIDATION OF ENVISAT-1 LEVEL-2 PRODUCTS RELATED TO LOWER ATMOSPHERE O3 AND NOy CHEMISTRY BY A FTIR QUASI-GLOBAL NETWORK
De Mazière, M.; Coosemans, T.; Barret, B. et al

Scientific conference (2002, December)

A coordinated action involving eleven stations of the ground-based Network for Detection of Stratospheric Change (NDSC) equipped with Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) instruments was conducted to ... [more ▼]

A coordinated action involving eleven stations of the ground-based Network for Detection of Stratospheric Change (NDSC) equipped with Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) instruments was conducted to contribute to the validation of the three atmospheric chemistry instruments onboard ENVISAT, that are MIPAS, SCIAMACHY and GOMOS. The target products for validation are total columns of O3, CH4, CO and some important NOy species (NO2, HNO3, NO) and the source gas N2O. Together the eleven stations cover the latitudes between 79 °N and 78°S, including polar, mid -latitude and subtropical and tropical locations. The goal is to contribute to the assessment of the data quality of the aforementioned ENVISAT instruments, from a quasi-global perspective. The period of intensive ground-based data collection for the benefit of the ENVISAT Validation Commissioning Phase that is dealt with in the present paper is July 15 to December 1, 2002. The FTIR network involved collected a data set corresponding to an equivalent of approximately 400 days of measurements; about three quarter of the data have already been submitted to the ENVISAT Calval database and are included in the present work. Unfortunately, the distribution of ENVISAT data has been slow and limited. Only a limited number of coincidences has been found for making data inter-comparisons. Therefore, the conclusions drawn in this paper are very preliminary and cover only a limited set of data products from SCIAMACHY only. Our findings up to now concerning the above mentioned target products are the following: (1) SCIAMACHY near infrared operational products (CO, CH4, N2O) have no scientific meaning yet, (2), the operational SCIAMACHY total vertical O3 column product derived in the ultraviolet window has undergone some improvements with changing versions of the processor(s) but it still underestimates the column by about 5 – 10 %, (3), the operational SCIAMACHY total vertical O3 column product derived in the visible window is unrealistically large, and (3), the operational NO2 total column product from SCIAMACHY seems to largely overestimate the real column, but very few coincidences and large dispersions of the data do inhibit any further conclusion at present. In a next phase, the same ground-based correlative data set will be exploited to further validate the ENVISAT data as soon as more and reprocessed data will be distributed. [less ▲]

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