References of "Jerusalem, Guy"
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See detailL'âgisme et ses conséquences cliniques en oncogériatrie: état des lieux et pistes d'interventions
Schroyen, Sarah ULg; Adam, Stéphane ULg; Jerusalem, Guy ULg et al

in Revue Médicale de Liège (in press), 69(5-6),

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See detailLE DÉFI DU CONTRÔLE LOCAL DANS LE CANCER PULMONAIRE NON A PETITES CELLULES, LOCALEMENT AVANCE, NON OPERABLE
BARTHELEMY, Nicole ULg; LENNERTS, Evelyne ULg; MEYNS, Mia ULg et al

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2014), 69(Supp 1), 75-80

Le cancer broncho-pulmonaire non à petites cellules (CBNPC) est fréquent. Pour près d’un patient sur cinq, au moment du diagnostic, la maladie est déjà localement avancée et inopérable. A ce stade, le ... [more ▼]

Le cancer broncho-pulmonaire non à petites cellules (CBNPC) est fréquent. Pour près d’un patient sur cinq, au moment du diagnostic, la maladie est déjà localement avancée et inopérable. A ce stade, le pronostic de cette affection est mauvais, caractérisé, entre autres, par un taux élevé de réci - dive locale, malgré la chimiothérapie et la radiothérapie. Le but de cette revue est de décrire l’hétérogénéité de ce groupe de patients, de clarifier les modalités de traitement combinant la chimiothérapie et la radiothérapie et de préciser l’intérêt des techniques modernes de radiothérapie pour améliorer le contrôle local [less ▲]

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See detailLe traitement multidisciplinaire du glioblastome
BARTHELEMY, Nicole ULg; GENNIGENS, Christine ULg; Scholtes, Félix ULg et al

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2014), 69

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See detailDisease management patterns for postmenopausal women in Europe with hormone-receptor-positive, human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 negative advanced breast cancer.
Andre, Fabrice; Neven, Patrick; Marinsek, Nina et al

in Current medical research and opinion (2014)

Abstract Background: International guidelines for hormone-receptor-positive (HR+), human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 negative (HER2-) advanced breast cancer (BC) recommend sequential lines of ... [more ▼]

Abstract Background: International guidelines for hormone-receptor-positive (HR+), human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 negative (HER2-) advanced breast cancer (BC) recommend sequential lines of hormonal therapy (HT), and only recommend chemotherapy for patients with extensive visceral involvement or rapidly progressive disease. This study evaluated actual physician-reported treatments for advanced BC in Europe. Methods: We conducted a retrospective chart review of 355 postmenopausal women with HR+, HER2- advanced BC who progressed on >/=1 line of HT (adjuvant or advanced) and completed >/=1 line of chemotherapy (advanced). Treatment choice was evaluated for each line of therapy. Results: Of 355 patients, 111 (31%) received first-line chemotherapy, whereas 218 (61%) and 26 (7%) switched from HT to chemotherapy in second and third line, respectively. More patients receiving first-line HT had bone metastases (73% vs 27% chemotherapy). Patients treated with first-line chemotherapy had more brain (12% vs 3% HT) or extensive liver (13% vs 6% HT) metastases. Subgroup analysis of 188 patients who received first-line HT and had de novo advanced BC or relapsed/recurrent disease more than 1 year after adjuvant therapy found that the majority (89%; n = 167) of these patients switched to chemotherapy in second line. However, among these 167 patients, 27% had no significant changes in metastases between first and second line. Among the 73% of patients who had significant changes in metastases, 20% had no brain metastases or extensive visceral disease. Conclusions: Our study suggests that the guideline-recommended use of multiple HT lines is open to interpretation and that optimal treatment for European postmenopausal women with HR+, HER2- advanced BC who responded to HT may not be achieved. [less ▲]

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See detailFinal Overall Survival: Fulvestrant 500 mg vs 250 mg in the Randomized CONFIRM Trial.
Leo, Angelo Di; Leo, Angelo Di; Jerusalem, Guy ULg et al

in Journal of the National Cancer Institute (2014), 106(1), 337

BACKGROUND: At the time of the initial analysis of overall survival (OS) for the Comparison of Faslodex in Recurrent or Metastatic Breast Cancer (CONFIRM) randomized, double-blind, phase III trial ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: At the time of the initial analysis of overall survival (OS) for the Comparison of Faslodex in Recurrent or Metastatic Breast Cancer (CONFIRM) randomized, double-blind, phase III trial, approximately 50% of patients had died. A final analysis of OS was subsequently planned for when 75% of patients had died. METHODS: Patients were randomly assigned 1:1 to fulvestrant 500 mg administered as two 5-mL intramuscular injections on days 0, 14, and 28 and every 28 (+/-3) days thereafter or fulvestrant 250 mg administered as two 5-mL intramuscular injections (one fulvestrant and one placebo [identical in appearance to study drug]) on days 0, 14 (two placebo injections only), and 28 and every 28 (+/-3) days thereafter. OS was analyzed using an unadjusted log-rank test. No adjustments were made for multiplicity. Serious adverse events (SAEs) and best response to subsequent therapy were also reported. All statistical tests were two-sided. RESULTS: In total, 736 women (median age = 61.0 years) were randomly assigned to fulvestrant 500mg (n = 362) or 250mg (n = 374). At the final survival analysis, 554 of 736 (75.3%) patients had died. Median OS was 26.4 months for fulvestrant 500mg and 22.3 months for 250mg (hazard ratio = 0.81; 95% confidence interval = 0.69-0.96; nominal P = .02). There were no clinically important differences in SAE profiles between the treatment groups; no clustering of SAEs could be detected in either treatment group. Type of first subsequent therapy and objective responses to first subsequent therapy were well balanced between the two treatment groups. CONCLUSIONS: In patients with locally advanced or metastatic estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer, fulvestrant 500mg is associated with a 19% reduction in risk of death and a 4.1-month difference in median OS compared with fulvestrant 250mg. Fulvestrant 500mg was well tolerated, and no new safety concerns were identified. [less ▲]

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See detailBOLERO-3 : Everolimus plus Trastuzumab and Vinorelbine in asian patients with HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer
Toi, Masakazu; Masuda, Norikazu; ANDRE, Fabrice et al

Poster (2013, December)

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See detailmTOR inhibitors in advanced breast cancer: ready for prime time?
Martin, Lesley-Ann; Andre, Fabrice; Campone, Mario et al

in Cancer Treatment Reviews (2013), 39(7), 742-52

Current therapeutic approaches for advanced breast cancer frequently target receptors mediating cell survival and proliferation, such as the estrogen receptor and/or progesterone receptor and human ... [more ▼]

Current therapeutic approaches for advanced breast cancer frequently target receptors mediating cell survival and proliferation, such as the estrogen receptor and/or progesterone receptor and human epidermal growth factor receptor-2. Although these approaches are effective for many patients, treatment resistance is common. Therefore, new treatment approaches are needed for patients with advanced breast cancer. Mammalian target of rapamycin is a highly conserved serine-threonine kinase that acts as a major signaling hub that integrates and synergizes with cellular proliferation, survival, and/or motility signals mediated by estrogen receptor, human epidermal growth factor receptor-2, and other receptor tyrosine kinases. Dysregulation of mammalian target of rapamycin signaling occurs in various tumor types, including breast cancer, and has been associated with cancer pathogenesis, disease progression, and treatment resistance. Recent clinical trials show that combined inhibition of mammalian target of rapamycin and estrogen receptor represents an effective strategy for treating hormone receptor-positive advanced breast cancer progressing on nonsteroidal aromatase inhibitor therapy, and data from ongoing trials combining mammalian target of rapamycin inhibition with human epidermal growth factor receptor-2-targeted therapy are awaited. This review focuses on the molecular rationale underlying strategies to enhance sensitivity to treatment in hormone receptor-positive and human epidermal growth factor receptor-2-positive advanced breast cancer, the clinical efficacy of such approaches, and future perspectives. [less ▲]

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See detailEvaluation of Everolimus (EVE) in HER2+ advanced breast cancer (BC) with activated PI3K/mTOR pathway : exploratory biomarker observations from the BOLERO-3 trial
JERUSALEM, Guy ULg; ANDRE, Fabrice; CHEN, David et al

in European Journal of Cancer (2013, September), 49(Supplement 3), 8

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See detailEverolimus Plus Exemestane Versus Everolimus or Capecitabine Monotherapy in Breast Cancer : BOLERO-6
Ejlertsen, Bent; JERUSALEM, Guy ULg; Hurvitz, Sara et al

Poster (2013, March)

The data from this trial will provide insight into the safety and efficacy of the combination of EVE and EXE versus EVE or capecitabine monotherapy in women with ER+, HER2- ABC progressing on/after prior ... [more ▼]

The data from this trial will provide insight into the safety and efficacy of the combination of EVE and EXE versus EVE or capecitabine monotherapy in women with ER+, HER2- ABC progressing on/after prior LET or ANA. [less ▲]

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See detailLe cas clinique du mois. Metastase musculaire en presence d'un cancer de l'ovaire.
Benoit, A.; Jerusalem, Guy ULg; GENNIGENS, Christine ULg

in Revue medicale de Liege (2013), 68(11), 557-61

We report the case of a patient with a sero-papillary ovarian cancer and a pectoral muscle metastasis. Muscular metastases are more common than previously suspected; any physician could encounter this ... [more ▼]

We report the case of a patient with a sero-papillary ovarian cancer and a pectoral muscle metastasis. Muscular metastases are more common than previously suspected; any physician could encounter this type of case in his daily practice. This paper summarizes the literature on the subject. [less ▲]

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See detailCancer risk in immune-mediated inflammatory diseases (IMID).
Beyaert, Rudi; Beaugerie, Laurent; Van Assche, Gert et al

in Molecular cancer (2013), 12(1), 98

Inflammation and cancer have a profound yet ambiguous relationship. Inflammation - especially chronic inflammation - has protumorigenic effects, but inflammatory cells also mediate an immune response ... [more ▼]

Inflammation and cancer have a profound yet ambiguous relationship. Inflammation - especially chronic inflammation - has protumorigenic effects, but inflammatory cells also mediate an immune response against the tumor and immunosuppression is known to increase the risk for certain tumors.This article reviews current literature on the role of inflammation in cancer and the cancer risk in immune-mediated inflammatory diseases (IMIDs). We discuss the effect on cancer risk of different drug classes used in the treatment of IMIDs treatment, including biologicals such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitors.Overall cancer incidence and mortality risk are similar to the general population in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), and slightly increased for rheumatoid arthritis and psoriasis, with risk profiles differing for different tumor types. Increased risk for non-melanoma skin cancer is associated with thiopurine treatment in IBD, with the combination of anti-TNF and methotrexate in rheumatoid arthritis and with PUVA, cyclosporine and anti-TNF treatment in psoriasis. Data on the safety of using biologic or immunosuppressant therapy in IMID patients with a history of cancer are scarce.This review provides clinicians with a solid background to help them in making decisions about treatment of immune-mediated diseases in patients with a tumor history.This article is related to another review article in Molecular Cancer: http://www.molecular-cancer.com/content/12/1/86. [less ▲]

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See detailComparative efficacy of everolimus plus exemestane versus fulvestrant for hormone-receptor-positive advanced breast cancer following progression/recurrence after endocrine therapy: a network meta-analysis.
Bachelot, Thomas; McCool, Rachael; Duffy, Steven et al

in Breast cancer research and treatment (2013)

Postmenopausal women with advanced breast cancer recurring/progressing on or after initial (adjuvant or first-line) endocrine therapy may be treated multiple times with one of several endocrine or ... [more ▼]

Postmenopausal women with advanced breast cancer recurring/progressing on or after initial (adjuvant or first-line) endocrine therapy may be treated multiple times with one of several endocrine or combinatorial targeted treatment options before initiating chemotherapy. In the absence of direct head-to-head comparisons of these treatment options, an indirect comparison can inform treatment choice. This network meta-analysis compared the efficacy of everolimus plus exemestane with that of fulvestrant 250 and 500 mg in the advanced breast cancer setting following adjuvant or first-line endocrine therapy. The reported hazard ratios (HRs) for progression-free survival (PFS) or time to progression from six studies that formed a network to compare everolimus plus exemestane (BOLERO-2 trial) with fulvestrant were analyzed by means of a Bayesian network meta-analysis. In the primary comparison (PFS analysis based on the local review of disease progression from BOLERO-2 with the data from the other studies), everolimus plus exemestane appeared to be more efficacious than both fulvestrant 250 mg (HR = 0.47; 95 % credible interval [CrI] 0.38-0.58) and 500 mg (HR = 0.59; 95 % CrI 0.45-0.77). Similar results were obtained in an alternate comparison based on central review of disease progression from BOLERO-2 with the data from the other studies (HR = 0.40; 95 % CrI 0.31-0.51 and HR = 0.50; 95 % CrI 0.37-0.67, respectively), and in a subgroup analysis of patients who had received prior aromatase inhibitor therapy (HR = 0.47; 95 % CrI 0.38-0.58 and HR = 0.55; 95 % CrI 0.40-0.76, respectively). These results suggest that everolimus plus exemestane may be more efficacious than fulvestrant in patients with advanced breast cancer who progress on or after adjuvant or first-line therapy with a nonsteroidal aromatase inhibitor. [less ▲]

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See detailAttitudes of young patients with breast cancer toward fertility loss related to adjuvant systemic therapies. EORTC study 10002 BIG 3-98.
Senkus, Elzbieta; Gomez, Henry; Dirix, Luc et al

in Psycho-oncology (2013)

OBJECTIVE: Infertility due to anticancer treatments is a major source of distress for young patients with cancer. A survey was performed among breast cancer patients younger than 35 years, to evaluate the ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVE: Infertility due to anticancer treatments is a major source of distress for young patients with cancer. A survey was performed among breast cancer patients younger than 35 years, to evaluate the acceptance of chemotherapy in the context of infertility risk. METHODS: After obtaining written informed consent, we asked 400 premenopausal, early stage breast cancer patients aged </=35 years to complete a short, previously pilot-tested questionnaire. Three hundred and eighty-nine patients were evaluable. The association between the explanatory variables and the outcome variables was assessed using logistic regression. RESULTS: Two hundred and twenty-eight (59%) participants wanted to have (more) children in the future, whereas 158 (41%) did not. Fifty-seven (36%) of the latter did not want additional children because of fear of cancer recurrence. Thirty-two women (8%) stated they would not accept chemotherapy should it reduce their fertility. This was dependent upon already having children, the wish to have (further) children, geographical area, disease stage, and already planned chemotherapy. One hundred and seventy-one women who would agree to chemotherapy (48%) would accept a risk of infertility of 76-100%. This acceptance was dependent on already having children and the wish to have (more) children. Of the 355 participants (91%) accepting chemotherapy, 48 would accept it only for >/=20% gain in cure. CONCLUSION: For the majority of young patients with breast cancer, cure remains their first priority; for this, they are willing to accept a considerable decrease in future fertility, and only less than 10% will forego chances of cure to preserve fertility. Copyright (c) 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [less ▲]

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See detailTwo schedules of etirinotecan pegol (NKTR-102) in patients with previously treated metastatic breast cancer: a randomised phase 2 study.
Awada, Ahmad; Garcia, Agustin A.; Chan, Stephen et al

in The lancet oncology (2013)

BACKGROUND: New therapeutic options are needed for patients with heavily pretreated breast cancer. Etirinotecan pegol is a long-acting topoisomerase-I inhibitor designed to provide prolonged tumour-cell ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: New therapeutic options are needed for patients with heavily pretreated breast cancer. Etirinotecan pegol is a long-acting topoisomerase-I inhibitor designed to provide prolonged tumour-cell exposure to SN38, the active metabolite. We aimed to assess the efficacy and safety of two etirinotecan pegol dosing schedules in patients with previously treated metastatic breast cancer to determine an optimum dosing schedule for phase 3 trials. METHODS: In this randomised, two-stage, open-label phase 2 trial, we recruited patients aged 18 years or older who had received taxane therapy and undergone two or fewer previous chemotherapy regimens for metastatic breast cancer, with an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status of 0 or 1, from 18 sites in three countries. Eligible patients were randomly assigned (1:1) to etirinotecan pegol 145 mg/m2 every 14 days or every 21 days. The primary endpoint was the proportion of patients with a confirmed objective response as defined by Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors version 1.0, analysed by intention to treat. Safety was assessed in all patients who received at least one dose of study drug. This trial is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00802945. FINDINGS: 70 patients (35 in each group) were randomly assigned to treatment between Feb 17, 2009 and April 13, 2010. Of the 70 patients, 20 (29%; 95% CI 18.4-40.6) achieved an objective response (two [3%] had a complete response and 18 [26%] had a partial response). Ten patients on the 14-day schedule achieved an objective response (29%; 95% CI 14.6-46.3; eight partial responses, two complete responses) as did ten on the 21-day schedule (29%; 95% CI 14.6-46.3; all partial responses). The most common grade 3 or worse adverse events were delayed diarrhoea (seven [20%] of 35 patients on the 14-day schedule vs eight [23%] of 35 patients on the 21-day schedule), fatigue (five [14%] vs three [9%]), neutropenia (four [11%] vs four [11%]), and dehydration (three [9%] vs four [11%]); 14 [20%] patients discontinued treatment because of drug-related toxicity. There were two possible drug-related deaths (acute renal failure and septic shock) in the 14-day group; other drug-related serious adverse events reported by more than one patient included ten [14%] patients with diarrhoea (six [17%] patients on the 14-day schedule vs four [11%] on the 21-day schedule), six [9%] with dehydration (two [6%] vs four [11%]), two [3%] with nausea (two [6%] vs none), and two [3%] with vomiting (two [6%] vs none). INTERPRETATION: On the basis of the overall clinical data, pharmacokinetics, and tolerability profile, etirinotecan pegol 145 mg/m2 every 21 days has been selected for a phase 3 trial against treatment of physician's choice in patients with advanced breast cancer. FUNDING: Nektar Therapeutics. [less ▲]

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