References of "Jacquinet, Adeline"
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See detailFemoral-facial syndrome: long term follow-up and associated array CGH abnormalities.
JACQUINET, Adeline ULg; VALDES SOCIN, Hernan Gonzalo ULg; LIBIOULLE, Cécile ULg et al

Poster (2013, October 22)

The femoral-facial syndrome is usually sporadic and its aetiology remains unknown. Non-genetic factors as maternal diabetes mellitus have been associated. Reports of familial cases have otherwise ... [more ▼]

The femoral-facial syndrome is usually sporadic and its aetiology remains unknown. Non-genetic factors as maternal diabetes mellitus have been associated. Reports of familial cases have otherwise suggested autosomal dominant inheritance. We report the 20 years clinical follow-up of a girl with femoral-facial syndrome diagnosed at birth. Recently, array CGH investigation identified a 1400 kb duplication at 9q31.1, including the gene SMC2, and a 343 kb deletion at 12q24.33 including the genes CHFR, ZNF26, ZNF140, ZNF10 and ZNF268. Moreover, the patient presents a Mayer-Rokitansky-Kuster-Hauser syndrome diagnosed at puberty. Femoral-facial syndrome and Mullerian agenesis may reflect different defects in the primary axial mesodermal development, being the consequences of same environmental or/and genetic factors during blastogenesis. Among these genetic factors, we suggest the possible involvement of the two copy number variants reported here [less ▲]

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See detailTemple-Baraitser syndrome: a rare and possibly unrecognized condition.
Jacquinet, Adeline ULg; Gerard, Marion; Gabbett, Michael T et al

in American Journal of Medical Genetics. Part A (2010), 152A(9), 2322-6

Temple-Baraitser syndrome, previously described in two unrelated patients, is the association of severe mental retardation and abnormal thumbs and great toes. We report two additional unrelated patients ... [more ▼]

Temple-Baraitser syndrome, previously described in two unrelated patients, is the association of severe mental retardation and abnormal thumbs and great toes. We report two additional unrelated patients with Temple-Baraitser syndrome, review clinical and radiological features of previously reported cases and discuss mode of inheritance. Patients share a consistent pattern of anomalies: hypo or aplasia of the thumb and great toe nails and broadening and/or elongation of the thumbs and halluces, which have a tubular aspect. All patients were born to unrelated parents and occurred as a single occurrence in multiple sibships, suggesting sporadic inheritance from a de novo mutation mechanism. Comparative genomic hybridization in Patients 1, 2 and 3 did not reveal any copy number variations. We confirm that Temple-Baraitser syndrome represents a distinct syndrome, probably unrecognized, possibly caused by a de novo mutation in a not yet identified gene. [less ▲]

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