References of "JERUSALEM, Guy"
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See detailA Belgian Survey on Geriatric Assessment in Oncology Focusing on Large-Scale Implementation and Related Barriers and Facilitators.
Kenis, C.; Heeren, P.; Decoster, L. et al

in The journal of nutrition, health & aging (2016), 20(1), 60-70

OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study is to describe a large-scale, Belgian implementation project about geriatric assessment (=GA) in daily oncology practice and to identify barriers and facilitators for ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study is to describe a large-scale, Belgian implementation project about geriatric assessment (=GA) in daily oncology practice and to identify barriers and facilitators for implementing GA in this setting. Design / setting / participants: The principal investigator of every participating hospital (n=22) was invited to complete a newly developed questionnaire with closed- and open-ended questions. The closed-ended questions surveyed how GA was implemented. The open-ended questions identified barriers and facilitators for the implementation of GA in daily oncology practice. Descriptive statistics and conventional content analysis were performed as appropriate. RESULTS: Qualifying criteria (e.g. disease status and cancer type) for GA varied substantially between hospitals. Thirteen hospitals (59.1%) succeeded to screen more than half of eligible patients. Most hospitals reported that GA data and follow-up data had been collected in almost all screened patients. Implementing geriatric recommendations and formulating new geriatric recommendations at the time of follow-up are important opportunities for improvement. The majority of identified barriers were organizational, with high workload, lack of time or financial/staffing problems as most cited. The most cited facilitators were all related to collaboration. CONCLUSION: Interventions to improve the implementation of GA in older patients with cancer need to address a wide range of factors, with organization and collaboration as key elements. All stakeholders, seeking to improve the implementation of GA in older patients with cancer, should consider and address the identified barriers and facilitators. [less ▲]

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See detailCirculating microRNA-based screening tool for breast cancer
Freres, Pierre ULg; Wenric, Stéphane ULg; Boukerroucha, Meriem et al

in Oncotarget (2015)

Circulating microRNAs (miRNAs) are increasingly recognized as powerful biomarkers in several pathologies, including breast cancer. Here, their plasmatic levels were measured to be used as an alternative ... [more ▼]

Circulating microRNAs (miRNAs) are increasingly recognized as powerful biomarkers in several pathologies, including breast cancer. Here, their plasmatic levels were measured to be used as an alternative screening procedure to mammography for breast cancer diagnosis. A plasma miRNA profile was determined by RT-qPCR in a cohort of 378 women. A diagnostic model was designed based on the expression of 8 miRNAs measured first in a profiling cohort composed of 41 primary breast cancers and 45 controls, and further validated in diverse cohorts composed of 108 primary breast cancers, 88 controls, 35 breast cancers in remission, 31 metastatic breast cancers and 30 gynecologic tumors. A receiver operating characteristic curve derived from the 8-miRNA random forest based diagnostic tool exhibited an area under the curve of 0.81. The accuracy of the diagnostic tool remained unchanged considering age and tumor stage. The miRNA signature correctly identified patients with metastatic breast cancer. The use of the classification model on cohorts of patients with breast cancers in remission and with gynecologic cancers yielded prediction distributions similar to that of the control group. Using a multivariate supervised learning method and a set of 8 circulating miRNAs, we designed an accurate, minimally invasive screening tool for breast cancer. [less ▲]

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See detailMT4-MMP, a potential prognostic factor in triple negative breast cancer
Yip, Cassandre ULg; FOIDART, Pierre ULg; SOMJA, Joan ULg et al

Scientific conference (2015, December 03)

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See detailAgeism among nurses in oncology
Schroyen, Sarah ULg; Missotten, Pierre ULg; JERUSALEM, Guy ULg et al

Poster (2015, October 14)

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See detailPsychological benefits of a multidisciplinary rehabilitation program after breast cancer
Leclerc, Anne-France ULg; FOIDART-DESSALLE, Marguerite ULg; Bury, Thierry ULg et al

Conference (2015, September 27)

Background : Breast cancer is the most frequent cancer in women, affecting 8 women out of 100. With early detection and improved treatments, the number of deaths linked to this disease has declined ... [more ▼]

Background : Breast cancer is the most frequent cancer in women, affecting 8 women out of 100. With early detection and improved treatments, the number of deaths linked to this disease has declined. However, the disease and its treatments are at the origin of many undesirable side effects such as fatigue, anxiety, weight gain and sleep disorders. The objective of this study is to determine the psychological benefits of a multidisciplinary rehabilitation program among women treated for breast cancer (on average six months after the end of the adjuvant radiotherapy or chimiotherapy). Material and methods : 122 patients were included into a control group (n = 61) and a treated group (n = 61). All participants were submitted to evaluations before the beginning of the trial and after three months. These evaluations included different questionnaires exploring the quality of life, anxiety, depression and various functions and other symptoms related to cancer (EORTC QLQ-C30, EQ-5D, STAI, HADS) and functional assessments. The control group has received no intervention unlike the treated group that received a three-month rehabilitation including supervised physical training (90 min) with three times a week and various psycho-educational sessions (120 min) once a week. Results : After three months, the health status (quality of life) (p < 0,0001), the functional role (p = 0,031), emotional state (p < 0,0001) and physical (p = 0,0045), cognitive (p = 0,0027) and social functions (p = 0,0018) improve significantly in the treated group. This observation also applies to symptoms of fatigue (p < 0,0001), insomnia (p < 0,0001), pain (p = 0,002), dyspnea (p = 0,009), loss of appetite (p = 0,04), anxiety (p < 0,0001) and depression (p < 0,0001) as well as physical parameters obtained through functional assessments. In the control group, these improvements do not appear. Conclusions : This study shows the feasibility and psychological benefits of such a multidisciplinary oncological rehabilitation program in women after their treatments for breast cancer. Additional studies are needed to know the optimal time of beginning (during treatments or after them) and the optimal management time for this support. [less ▲]

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See detailPhysical benefits of a multidisciplinary rehabilitation program after breast cancer
Leclerc, Anne-France ULg; FOIDART-DESSALLE, Marguerite ULg; Bury, Thierry ULg et al

Poster (2015, September 26)

Background : Breast cancer is the most frequent cancer in women, affecting 8 women out of 100. With early detection and improved treatments, the number of deaths linked to this disease has declined ... [more ▼]

Background : Breast cancer is the most frequent cancer in women, affecting 8 women out of 100. With early detection and improved treatments, the number of deaths linked to this disease has declined. However, the disease and its treatments are at the origin of many undesirable side effects such as fatigue, anxiety, weight gain and decreased physical fitness. The objective of this study is to determine the physical benefits of a multidisciplinary rehabilitation program among women treated for breast cancer (on average six months after the end of the adjuvant radiotherapy or chimiotherapy). Material and methods : 122 patients were included into a control group (n = 61) and a treated group (n = 61). All participants were submitted to evaluations before the beginning of the trial and after three months. These evaluations included functional assessments (a maximal incremental exercise protocol on a cycle ergometer, flexibility by Sit and Reach Test and walking distance by Six-Minute Walk Test), anthropometric and body composition measurements (Body Mass Index and body fat percentage) and different questionnaires on quality of life, anxiety and other symptoms related to cancer. The control group has received no intervention unlike the treated group that received a three-month rehabilitation including supervised physical training (90 min) with three times a week and various psycho-educational sessions (120 min) once a week. Results : After three months, maximal oxygen consumption (p < 0,0001), maximal aerobic power (p < 0,0001), peak of ventilation (p < 0,0001) and time to exhaustion (p = 0,0055) during the maximal incremental exercise protocol improve significantly in the treated group. This observation also applies to flexibility (p < 0,0001), walking distance in six minutes (p < 0,0001) and different physical and psychological parameters obtained through questionnaires. In the control group, these improvements do not appear and a significant increase in body mass index (p = 0,032) and body fat percentage (p = 0,034) is observed while these data remain constant in the treated group. Conclusions : This study shows the feasibility and physical benefits of such a multidisciplinary oncological rehabilitation program in women after their treatments for breast cancer. Additional studies are needed to know the optimal time of beginning (during treatments or after them) and the optimal management time for this support. [less ▲]

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See detailClinical significance of MT4-MMP and EGFR expression in Breast Cancer
Yip, Cassandre ULg; PAYE, Alexandra ULg; Truong, Alice ULg et al

Scientific conference (2015, September 11)

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See detailMT4-MMP, a potential therapeutic target in triple negative breast cancer
Yip, Cassandre ULg; FOIDART, Pierre ULg; SOMJA, Joan ULg et al

Poster (2015, September)

MT4-MMP and EGFR axis may have a significant role in patient outcome and response to EGFR targeted therapy. This axis is clinically relevant in TNBC, the most aggressive breast cancer subtype. TNBC are ... [more ▼]

MT4-MMP and EGFR axis may have a significant role in patient outcome and response to EGFR targeted therapy. This axis is clinically relevant in TNBC, the most aggressive breast cancer subtype. TNBC are known to express high level of EGFR and treatment options are limited due to the non response of to the EGFR targeted therapy. Expression levels of MT4-MMP and EGFR in TNBC may be used as prognosis factor for the selection of patient who may respond or not to EGFR targeted therapy. Also, our data shed light and the potential therapeutic option of targeting both MT4-MMP and EGFR in TNBC. [less ▲]

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See detailClinical significance of MT4-MMP and EGFR expression in Breast Cancer
Yip, Cassandre ULg; PAYE, Alexandra ULg; Truong, Alice ULg et al

Scientific conference (2015, June)

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See detailBRCA1 germline mutation and glioblastoma development: report of cases
Boukerroucha, Meriem ULg; Josse, Claire ULg; SEGERS, Karin ULg et al

in BMC Cancer (2015), 15

Background Germline mutations in breast cancer susceptibility gene 1 (BRCA1) increase the risk of breast and ovarian cancers. However, no association between BRCA1 germline mutation and glioblastoma ... [more ▼]

Background Germline mutations in breast cancer susceptibility gene 1 (BRCA1) increase the risk of breast and ovarian cancers. However, no association between BRCA1 germline mutation and glioblastoma malignancy has ever been highlighted. Here we report two cases of BRCA1 mutated patients who developed a glioblastoma (GBM). Cases presentation Two patients diagnosed with triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) were screened for BRCA1 germline mutation. They both carried a pathogenic mutation introducing a premature STOP codon in the exon 11 of the BRCA1 gene. Few years later, both patients developed a glioblastoma and a second breast cancer. In an attempt to clarify the role played by a mutated BRCA1 allele in the GBM development, we investigated the BRCA1 mRNA and protein expression in breast and glioblastoma tumours for both patients. The promoter methylation status of this gene was also tested by methylation specific PCR as BRCA1 expression is also known to be lost by this mechanism in some sporadic breast cancers. Conclusion Our data show that BRCA1 expression is maintained in glioblastoma at the protein and the mRNA levels, suggesting that loss of heterozygosity (LOH) did not occur in these cases. The protein expression is tenfold higher in the glioblastoma of patient 1 than in her first breast carcinoma, and twice higher in patient 2. In agreement with the high protein expression level in the GBM, BRCA1 promoter methylation was not observed in these tumours. In these two cases, despite of a BRCA1 pathogenic germline mutation, the tumour-suppressor protein expression is maintained in GBM, suggesting that the BRCA1 mutation is not instrumental for the GBM development. [less ▲]

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See detailMetabolomic, proteomic and preclinical imaging of patient-derived tumor xenografts for improving treatment of liver metastases patients
Perez Palacios, A; Blomme, A; Boutry, S et al

in Acta Gastro-Enterologica Belgica (2015, March), 78(1), 134

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See detailClinical significance of MT4-MMP and EGFR expression in Breast Cancer
Yip, Cassandre ULg; PAYE, Alexandra ULg; Truong, Alice ULg et al

Scientific conference (2015, February 11)

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See detailOncological and surgical outcome after oncoplastic breast surgery
NIZET, Jean-Luc ULg; MAWEJA, Sylvie ULg; LAKOSI, Ferenc ULg et al

in Acta Chirurgica Belgica (2015), 115

BACKGROUND: Oncoplastic surgery combines breast-conserving treatment and plastic surgery techniques. The aim of the study was to identify breast and tumor-related characteristics that contribute to the ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Oncoplastic surgery combines breast-conserving treatment and plastic surgery techniques. The aim of the study was to identify breast and tumor-related characteristics that contribute to the rate of complications and recurrence. METHODS: This retrospective study included 72 patients with a median follow-up of 32 months. For each patient, a comprehensive set of data was collected, including epidemiology, tumor characteristics, preoperative information, detailed pathology reports, radiotherapy treatment and type of surgical technique. The rate of complications, recurrence and survival were studied. RESULTS: Complete tumor removal was performed with clear margins in all patients but in 25 of them margins were less than 2 mm. One patient had local recurrence and another developed distant metastases. The study showed that the size of the margin was not predictive of recurrence as long as not positive; the greater the resection volume, the larger the excision margin. The resection size was the only factor influencing complications and no specific tumor-related factor significantly increased the complication rate. Surgical complications did not delay the initiation of chemotherapy and radiotherapy. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first oncoplastic study where both tumor and breast characteristics were analyzed using the most recent criteria of the literature. Oncoplastic surgery can be considered as oncologically safe. The resection size was the sole significant risk factor for postoperative complications. Complications after oncoplastic breast surgery did not differ neoadjuvant therapy. Long-term event-free survival was excellent (96% at 7 years). [less ▲]

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See detailClinical significance of MT4-MMP and EGFR expression in Breast Cancer
Yip, Cassandre ULg; PAYE, Alexandra ULg; Truong, Alice ULg et al

Scientific conference (2015, January 31)

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See detailPredictive biomarkers of everolimus efficacy in HER2+ advanced breast cancer : combined exploratory analysis from BOLERO-1 and BOLERO-3
Slamon, Dennis; Hurvitz, Sara; Chen, David et al

in Journal of Clinical Oncology (2015), 33(suppl ; abstr 512),

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See detailImplementation of geriatric assessment - based recommendations in older patients with cancer : a multicenter prospective study
Baitar, A; Kenis, C; Moor, R et al

in Journal of Geriatric Oncology (2015), 6

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See detailAvelumab (MSB0010718C), an anti-PD-L1 antibody, in patients with metastatic or locally advanced solid tumors : assessment of safety and tolerability in a phase I, open-label expansion study
Kelly, Karen; Patel, Manish R.; Infante, Jeffrey R. et al

in Journal of Clinical Oncology (2015), 33(suppl ; abstr 3044),

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See detailEffect of itraconazole and rifampin on the pharmacokinetics of olaparib table formulation in patients with advanced solid tumors : phase I open-label studies
Plummer, Elizabeth R.; Verheul, Henk M.W.; Rottey, Sylvie et al

in Journal of Clinical Oncology (2015), 33(suppl : abstr 2565),

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See detailAsporin Is a Fibroblast-Derived TGF-beta1 Inhibitor and a Tumor Suppressor Associated with Good Prognosis in Breast Cancer.
Maris, Pamela; Blomme, Arnaud; Palacios, Ana Perez et al

in PLoS medicine (2015), 12(9), 1001871

BACKGROUND: Breast cancer is a leading malignancy affecting the female population worldwide. Most morbidity is caused by metastases that remain incurable to date. TGF-beta1 has been identified as a key ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Breast cancer is a leading malignancy affecting the female population worldwide. Most morbidity is caused by metastases that remain incurable to date. TGF-beta1 has been identified as a key driving force behind metastatic breast cancer, with promising therapeutic implications. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Employing immunohistochemistry (IHC) analysis, we report, to our knowledge for the first time, that asporin is overexpressed in the stroma of most human breast cancers and is not expressed in normal breast tissue. In vitro, asporin is secreted by breast fibroblasts upon exposure to conditioned medium from some but not all human breast cancer cells. While hormone receptor (HR) positive cells cause strong asporin expression, triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) cells suppress it. Further, our findings show that soluble IL-1beta, secreted by TNBC cells, is responsible for inhibiting asporin in normal and cancer-associated fibroblasts. Using recombinant protein, as well as a synthetic peptide fragment, we demonstrate the ability of asporin to inhibit TGF-beta1-mediated SMAD2 phosphorylation, epithelial to mesenchymal transition, and stemness in breast cancer cells. In two in vivo murine models of TNBC, we observed that tumors expressing asporin exhibit significantly reduced growth (2-fold; p = 0.01) and metastatic properties (3-fold; p = 0.045). A retrospective IHC study performed on human breast carcinoma (n = 180) demonstrates that asporin expression is lowest in TNBC and HER2+ tumors, while HR+ tumors have significantly higher asporin expression (4-fold; p = 0.001). Assessment of asporin expression and patient outcome (n = 60; 10-y follow-up) shows that low protein levels in the primary breast lesion significantly delineate patients with bad outcome regardless of the tumor HR status (area under the curve = 0.87; 95% CI 0.78-0.96; p = 0.0001). Survival analysis, based on gene expression (n = 375; 25-y follow-up), confirmed that low asporin levels are associated with a reduced likelihood of survival (hazard ratio = 0.58; 95% CI 0.37-0.91; p = 0.017). Although these data highlight the potential of asporin to serve as a prognostic marker, confirmation of the clinical value would require a prospective study on a much larger patient cohort. CONCLUSIONS: Our data show that asporin is a stroma-derived inhibitor of TGF-beta1 and a tumor suppressor in breast cancer. High asporin expression is significantly associated with less aggressive tumors, stratifying patients according to the clinical outcome. Future pre-clinical studies should consider options for increasing asporin expression in TNBC as a promising strategy for targeted therapy. [less ▲]

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