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See detailWASP-22 b: A Transiting "Hot Jupiter" Planet in a Hierarchical Triple System
Maxted, P. F. L.; Anderson, D. R.; Gillon, Michaël ULg et al

in Astrophysical Journal (2010), 140(6), 2007-2012

We report the discovery of a transiting planet orbiting the star TYC 6446-326-1. The star, WASP-22, is a moderately bright (V = 12.0) solar-type star (T[SUB]eff[/SUB] = 6000 ± 100 K, [Fe/H] = –0.05 ± 0.08 ... [more ▼]

We report the discovery of a transiting planet orbiting the star TYC 6446-326-1. The star, WASP-22, is a moderately bright (V = 12.0) solar-type star (T[SUB]eff[/SUB] = 6000 ± 100 K, [Fe/H] = –0.05 ± 0.08). The light curve of the star obtained with the WASP-South instrument shows periodic transit-like features with a depth of about 1% and a duration of 0.14 days. The presence of a transit-like feature in the light curve is confirmed using z-band photometry obtained with Faulkes Telescope South. High-resolution spectroscopy obtained with the CORALIE and HARPS spectrographs confirms the presence of a planetary mass companion with an orbital period of 3.533 days in a near-circular orbit. From a combined analysis of the spectroscopic and photometric data assuming that the star is a typical main-sequence star we estimate that the planet has a mass M [SUB]p[/SUB] = 0.56 ± 0.02M [SUB]Jup[/SUB] and a radius R [SUB]p[/SUB] = 1.12 ± 0.04R [SUB]Jup[/SUB]. In addition, there is a linear trend of 40 m s[SUP]–1[/SUP] yr[SUP]–1[/SUP] in the radial velocities measured over 16 months, from which we infer the presence of a third body with a long-period orbit in this system. The companion may be a low mass M-dwarf, a white dwarf, or a second planet. [less ▲]

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See detailWASP-16b: A New Jupiter-Like Planet Transiting a Southern Solar Analog
Lister, T. A.; Anderson, D. R.; Gillon, Michaël ULg et al

in Astrophysical Journal (2009), 703

We report the discovery from WASP-South of a new Jupiter-like extrasolar planet, WASP-16b, which transits its solar analog host star every 3.12 days. Analysis of the transit photometry and radial velocity ... [more ▼]

We report the discovery from WASP-South of a new Jupiter-like extrasolar planet, WASP-16b, which transits its solar analog host star every 3.12 days. Analysis of the transit photometry and radial velocity spectroscopic data leads to a planet with R [SUB]p[/SUB] = 1.008 ± 0.071 R [SUB]Jup[/SUB] and M [SUB]p[/SUB] = 0.855 ± 0.059 M [SUB]Jup[/SUB], orbiting a host star with R [SUB]*[/SUB] = 0.946 ± 0.054 R [SUB]sun[/SUB] and M [SUB]*[/SUB] = 1.022 ± 0.101 M [SUB]sun[/SUB]. Comparison of the high resolution stellar spectrum with synthetic spectra and stellar evolution models indicates the host star is a near-solar metallicity ([Fe/H] =0.01 ± 0.10) solar analog (T [SUB]eff[/SUB] = 5700 ± 150 K and log g = 4.5 ± 0.2) of intermediate age (tau = 2.3[SUP]+5.8[/SUP] [SUB]--2.2[/SUB] Gyr). [less ▲]

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See detailAn orbital period of 0.94days for the hot-Jupiter planet WASP-18b
Hellier, Coel; Anderson, D. R.; Cameron, A Collier et al

in Nature (2009), 460

The `hot Jupiters' that abound in lists of known extrasolar planets are thought to have formed far from their host stars, but migrate inwards through interactions with the proto-planetary disk from which ... [more ▼]

The `hot Jupiters' that abound in lists of known extrasolar planets are thought to have formed far from their host stars, but migrate inwards through interactions with the proto-planetary disk from which they were born, or by an alternative mechanism such as planet-planet scattering. The hot Jupiters closest to their parent stars, at orbital distances of only ~0.02 astronomical units, have strong tidal interactions, and systems such as OGLE-TR-56 have been suggested as tests of tidal dissipation theory. Here we report the discovery of planet WASP-18b with an orbital period of 0.94days and a mass of ten Jupiter masses (10M[SUB]Jup[/SUB]), resulting in a tidal interaction an order of magnitude stronger than that of planet OGLE-TR-56b. Under the assumption that the tidal-dissipation parameter Q of the host star is of the order of 10[SUP]6[/SUP], as measured for Solar System bodies and binary stars and as often applied to extrasolar planets, WASP-18b will be spiralling inwards on a timescale less than a thousandth that of the lifetime of its host star. Therefore either WASP-18 is in a rare, exceptionally short-lived state, or the tidal dissipation in this system (and possibly other hot-Jupiter systems) must be much weaker than in the Solar System. [less ▲]

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See detailDiscovery and characterization of WASP-6b, an inflated sub-Jupiter mass planet transiting a solar-type star
Gillon, Michaël ULg; Anderson, D. R.; Triaud, A H M J et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2009), 501

We report the discovery of WASP-6b, an inflated sub-Jupiter mass planet transiting every 3.3610060[SUP]+ 0.0000022 [/SUP][SUB]- 0.0000035 [/SUB] days a mildly metal-poor solar-type star of magnitude V ... [more ▼]

We report the discovery of WASP-6b, an inflated sub-Jupiter mass planet transiting every 3.3610060[SUP]+ 0.0000022 [/SUP][SUB]- 0.0000035 [/SUB] days a mildly metal-poor solar-type star of magnitude V = 11.9. A combined analysis of the WASP photometry, high-precision followup transit photometry and radial velocities yield a planetary mass M[SUB]p[/SUB] = 0.503[SUP]+0.019[/SUP][SUB]-0.038[/SUB] M[SUB]J[/SUB] and radius R[SUB]p[/SUB] = 1.224[SUP]+0.051[/SUP][SUB]-0.052[/SUB] R_J, resulting in a density rho[SUB]p[/SUB] = 0.27 ± 0.05 rho_J. The mass and radius for the host star are M_ast = 0.88[SUP]+0.05[/SUP][SUB]-0.08[/SUB] M_o and R_ast = 0.870[SUP]+0.025[/SUP][SUB]-0.036[/SUB] R_o. The non-zero orbital eccentricity e = 0.054^+0.018[SUB]-0.015[/SUB] that we measure suggests that the planet underwent a massive tidal heating 1 Gyr ago that could have contributed to its inflated radius. High-precision radial velocities obtained during a transit allow us to measure a sky-projected angle between the stellar spin and orbital axis beta = 11[SUP]+14[/SUP][SUB]-18[/SUB] deg. In addition to similar published measurements, this result favors a dominant migration mechanism based on tidal interactions with a protoplanetary disk. Based on data collected with the HARPS spectrograph at ESO La Silla Observatory in the programs 082.C-0040(E) and 082.C-0608. The photometric time-series and radial velocities (Tables 4, 5) used in this work are only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/501/785 [less ▲]

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See detailThe Low Density Transiting Exoplanet WASP-15b
West, R. G.; Anderson, D. R.; Gillon, Michaël ULg et al

in Astronomical Journal (The) (2009), 137

We report the discovery of a low-density exoplanet transiting an 11th magnitude star in the Southern hemisphere. WASP-15b, which orbits its host star with a period P = 3.7520656 ± 0.0000028 d, has a mass ... [more ▼]

We report the discovery of a low-density exoplanet transiting an 11th magnitude star in the Southern hemisphere. WASP-15b, which orbits its host star with a period P = 3.7520656 ± 0.0000028 d, has a mass M [SUB]p[/SUB] = 0.542 ± 0.050 M [SUB]J[/SUB] and radius R [SUB]p[/SUB] = 1.428 ± 0.077 R [SUB]J[/SUB], and is therefore one of the least dense transiting exoplanets so far discovered (rho[SUB]p[/SUB] = 0.247 ± 0.035 g cm[SUP]--3[/SUP]). An analysis of the spectrum of the host star shows it to be of spectral type around F5, with an effective temperature T [SUB]eff[/SUB] = 6300 ± 100 K and [Fe/H] = --0.17 ± 0.11. [less ▲]

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See detailWasp-7: A Bright Transiting-Exoplanet System in the Southern Hemisphere
Hellier, Coel; Anderson, D. R.; Gillon, Michaël ULg et al

in Astrophysical Journal (2009), 690

We report that a Jupiter-mass planet, WASP-7b, transits the V = 9.5 star HD 197286 every 4.95 d. This is the brightest discovery from the WASP-South transit survey so far and is currently the brightest ... [more ▼]

We report that a Jupiter-mass planet, WASP-7b, transits the V = 9.5 star HD 197286 every 4.95 d. This is the brightest discovery from the WASP-South transit survey so far and is currently the brightest transiting-exoplanet system in the southern hemisphere. WASP-7b is among the densest of the known Jupiter-mass planets, suggesting that it has a massive core. The planet mass is 0.96[SUP]+0.12[/SUP] [SUB]--0.18[/SUB] M [SUB]Jup[/SUB], the radius is 0.915[SUP]+0.046[/SUP] [SUB]--0.040[/SUB] R [SUB]Jup[/SUB], and the density is 1.26[SUP]+0.25[/SUP] [SUB]--0.21[/SUB] rho[SUB]Jup[/SUB] (1.67[SUP]+0.33[/SUP] [SUB]--0.28[/SUB] g cm[SUP]--3[/SUP]). [less ▲]

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See detailWASP-5b: a dense, very hot Jupiter transiting a 12th-mag Southern-hemisphere star
Anderson, D. R.; Gillon, Michaël ULg; Hellier, C. et al

in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society (2008), 387

We report the discovery of WASP-5b, a Jupiter-mass planet orbiting a 12th-mag G-type star in the Southern hemisphere. The 1.6-d orbital period places WASP-5b in the class of very hot Jupiters and leads to ... [more ▼]

We report the discovery of WASP-5b, a Jupiter-mass planet orbiting a 12th-mag G-type star in the Southern hemisphere. The 1.6-d orbital period places WASP-5b in the class of very hot Jupiters and leads to a predicted equilibrium temperature of 1750K. WASP-5b is the densest of any known Jovian-mass planet, being a factor of 7 denser than TrES-4, which is subject to similar stellar insolation, and a factor of 3 denser than WASP-4b, which has a similar orbital period. We present transit photometry and radial velocity measurements of WASP-5 (= USNO-B10487-0799749), from which we derive the mass, radius and density of the planet: M[SUB]P[/SUB] = 1.58[SUP]+0.13[/SUP][SUB]-0.08[/SUB]M[SUB]J[/SUB],R[SUB]P[/SUB] = 1.090[SUP]+0.094[/SUP][SUB]-0.058[/SUB]R[SUB]J[/SUB] and rho[SUB]P[/SUB] = 1.22[SUP]+0.19[/SUP][SUB]-0.24[/SUB]rho[SUB]J[/SUB]. The orbital period is P = 1.6284296[SUP]+0.0000048[/SUP][SUB]-0.0000037[/SUB]d and the mid-transit epoch is T[SUB]C[/SUB](HJD) = 2454375.62466[SUP]+0.00026[/SUP][SUB]-0.00025[/SUB]. [less ▲]

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See detailWASP-4b: A 12th Magnitude Transiting Hot Jupiter in the Southern Hemisphere
Wilson, D. M.; Gillon, Michaël ULg; Hellier, C. et al

in Astrophysical Journal (2008), 675

We report the discovery of WASP-4b, a large transiting gas-giant planet with an orbital period of 1.34 days. This is the first planet to be discovered by the SuperWASP-South observatory and CORALIE ... [more ▼]

We report the discovery of WASP-4b, a large transiting gas-giant planet with an orbital period of 1.34 days. This is the first planet to be discovered by the SuperWASP-South observatory and CORALIE collaboration and the first planet orbiting a star brighter than 16th magnitude to be discovered in the southern hemisphere. A simultaneous fit to high-quality light curves and precision radial velocity measurements leads to a planetary mass of 1.22[SUP]+0.09[/SUP][SUB]-0.08[/SUB] M[SUB]Jup[/SUB] and a planetary radius of 1.42[SUP]+0.07[/SUP][SUB]-0.04[/SUB] R[SUB]Jup[/SUB]. The host star is USNO-B1.0 0479-0948995, a G7 V star of visual magnitude 12.5. As a result of the short orbital period, the predicted surface temperature of the planet is 1761 K, making it an ideal candidate for detections of the secondary eclipse at infrared wavelengths. [less ▲]

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See detailWASP-1b and WASP-2b: two new transiting exoplanets detected with SuperWASP and SOPHIE
Cameron, A Collier; Bouchy, F.; Hébrard, G. et al

in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society (2007), 375

We have detected low-amplitude radial-velocity variations in two stars, USNO-B1.0 1219-0005465 (GSC 02265-00107 = WASP-1) and USNO-B1.0 0964-0543604 (GSC 00522-01199 = WASP-2). Both stars were identified ... [more ▼]

We have detected low-amplitude radial-velocity variations in two stars, USNO-B1.0 1219-0005465 (GSC 02265-00107 = WASP-1) and USNO-B1.0 0964-0543604 (GSC 00522-01199 = WASP-2). Both stars were identified as being likely host stars of transiting exoplanets in the 2004 SuperWASP wide-field transit survey. Using the newly commissioned radial-velocity spectrograph SOPHIE at the Observatoire de Haute-Provence, we found that both objects exhibit reflex orbital radial-velocity variations with amplitudes characteristic of planetary-mass companions and in-phase with the photometric orbits. Line-bisector studies rule out faint blended binaries as the cause of either the radial-velocity variations or the transits. We perform preliminary spectral analyses of the host stars, which together with their radial-velocity variations and fits to the transit light curves yield estimates of the planetary masses and radii. WASP-1b and WASP-2b have orbital periods of 2.52 and 2.15 d, respectively. Given mass estimates for their F7V and K1V primaries, we derive planet masses 0.80-0.98 and 0.81-0.95 times that of Jupiter, respectively. WASP-1b appears to have an inflated radius of at least 1.33 R[SUB]Jup[/SUB], whereas WASP-2b has a radius in the range 0.65-1.26 R[SUB]Jup[/SUB]. [less ▲]

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