References of "Huynen, Marie-Claude"
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See detailGastrointestinal Parasites in Captive and Free-ranging Cebus albifrons in the Western Amazon, Ecuador.
Martin, Sarah ULg; Carrillo Bilbao, Gabriel Alberto; Ramirez, William et al

in International Journal for Parasitology: Parasites and Wildlife (2017)

Currently, there is a lack of surveys that report the occurrence of gastrointestinal parasites in the white-headed capuchin monkey (Cebus albifrons). We therefore assessed the presence and richness ... [more ▼]

Currently, there is a lack of surveys that report the occurrence of gastrointestinal parasites in the white-headed capuchin monkey (Cebus albifrons). We therefore assessed the presence and richness (= number of different parasite genera) of parasites in C. albifrons in wildlife refuges (n = 11) and in a free-ranging group near a human village (n = 15) in the Ecuadorian Amazon. In the 78 samples collected (median of 3 samples per animal), we identified a total of 6 genera of gastrointestinal parasites, representing protozoa, nematodes, acantocephalan and cestodes. We observed a high prevalence (84%) across the 26 individuals, with the most prevalent parasite being Strongyloides sp. (76.9%), followed by Hymenolepis sp. (38.5%) and Prosthenorchis elegans (11.5%). We found Entamoeba histolytica/dispar/moskovskii/nuttalli and Capillaria sp. in only a minority of the animals (3.8%). In addition, we observed unidentified strongyles in approximately one-third of the animals (34.6%). We found a total of 6 parasite genera for the adult age group, which showed higher parasite richness than the subadult age group (5) and the juvenile age group (3). Faecal egg/cyst counts were not significantly different between captive and free-ranging individuals or between sexes or age groups. The free-ranging group had a higher prevalence than the captive group; however, this difference was not significant. The only genus common to captive and free-ranging individuals was Strongyloides sp. The high prevalence of gastrointestinal parasites and the presence of Strongyloides in both populations support results from previous studies in Cebus species. This high prevalence could be related to the high degree of humidity in the region. For the free-ranging group, additional studies are required to gain insights into the differences in parasite prevalence and intensity between age and sex groups. Additionally, our study demonstrated that a serial sampling of each individual increases the test sensitivity. [less ▲]

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See detailIntergroup variation in robbing and bartering by long-tailed macaques at Uluwatu Temple (Bali, Indonesia)
Brotcorne, Fany ULg; Giraud, Gwennan; Gunst, Noelle et al

in Primates : Journal of Primatology (2017)

Robbing and bartering (RB) is a behavioral practice anecdotally reported in free-ranging commensal macaques. It usually occurs in two steps: after taking inedible objects (e.g., glasses) from humans, the ... [more ▼]

Robbing and bartering (RB) is a behavioral practice anecdotally reported in free-ranging commensal macaques. It usually occurs in two steps: after taking inedible objects (e.g., glasses) from humans, the macaques appear to use them as tokens, returning them to humans in exchange for food. While extensively studied in captivity, our research is the first to investigate the object/food exchange between humans and primates in a natural setting. During a 4-month study in 2010, we used both focal and event sampling to record 201 RB events in a population of long-tailed macaques (Macaca fascicularis), including four neighboring groups ranging freely around Uluwatu Temple, Bali (Indonesia). In each group, we documented the RB frequency, prevalence and outcome, and tested the underpinning anthropogenic and demographic determinants. In line with the environmental opportunity hypothesis, we found a positive qualitative relation at the group level between time spent in tourist zones and RB frequency or prevalence. For two of the four groups, RB events were significantly more frequent when humans were more present in the environment. We also found qualitative partial support for the male-biased sex ratio hypothesis [i.e., RB was more frequent and prevalent in groups with higher ratios of (sub)adult males], whereas the group density hypothesis was not supported. This preliminary study showed that RB is a spontaneous, customary (in some groups), and enduring population-specific practice characterized by intergroup variation in Balinese macaques. As such, RB is a candidate for a new behavioral tradition in this species. [less ▲]

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See detailReproduction control as management strategy for local overpopulation of primates in tropical human-dominated habitats: a review
Brotcorne, Fany ULg; Wandia, Nengah; Poncin, Pascal ULg et al

Conference (2017, February 08)

Today, anthropogenic pressures are posing major challenges to Asian primates, forced either to adapt ecologically and behaviourally to the human massive encroachment into natural habitats, or to disappear ... [more ▼]

Today, anthropogenic pressures are posing major challenges to Asian primates, forced either to adapt ecologically and behaviourally to the human massive encroachment into natural habitats, or to disappear. Species ability to survive in human-modified habitats greatly varies, with generalist species, such as Cercopithecines, being more likely to thrive. Several macaque species in particular proliferate in situations of commensal association with humans, which leads sometimes to local overpopulation. High density of primates, resulting from the combined effect of population spatial compression and positive demographics, systematically induces conflicts with humans over crop-raiding and nuisance issues. Different management strategies have been deployed these last decades, going from culling or trapping programmes to sterilization campaigns. Sterilization is an ethical and flourishing solution to mitigate the human-macaque conflict by limiting the population expansion, but very few empirical data are available about their efficiency and potential side effects. We propose here to review various macaque sterilization programmes conducted in Asia, highlighting the pros and cons as well as the short- and long-term effects. As a study case, we will present data on population dynamics and side behavioural effects, as the base for an ongoing sterilization programme in a population of long-tailed macaques (M. fascicularis) in Bali (Indonesia). This population has experienced a tenfold increase over the last 30 years. Vasectomy undergone by several males in a former approach was not efficient to limit births. With others, we argue that macaque’s reproductive profile requires female sterilization. The goal here is to stimulate discussion over management of forced coexistence scenarios between human and primates, since this phenomenon is an integrative part of conservation in this rapidly changing world. [less ▲]

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See detailPersistence of the effec of frugivore identity on post-dispersal seed fate: consequences for the assessment of functional redundancy
Lugon, Ana Paula; Boutefeu, Marion; Bovy, Emilie et al

in Biotropica (2017)

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See detailStructure and floristic composition of Kibira rainforest, Burundi
Hakizimana, Dismas; Huynen, Marie-Claude ULg; Hambuckers, Alain ULg

in Tropical Ecology (2016), 57(4), 739-749

This paper gives the results of the first census of trees in the 32.15 ha plot in order to provide tree species richness in Kibira rainforest (Burundi). All trees ≥ 10 cm dbh were permanently tagged and ... [more ▼]

This paper gives the results of the first census of trees in the 32.15 ha plot in order to provide tree species richness in Kibira rainforest (Burundi). All trees ≥ 10 cm dbh were permanently tagged and their girth measured. The forest structure pattern analysed were diameter at breast height (dbh), basal area, relative dominance, and relative density, Importance Value Index (IVI) and Family Importance Value (FIV). In total, 6504 trees representing 70 species, 67 genera and 37 families were recorded. Tree density was 202 stems/ha, with a basal area of 21.05m²/ha. Seventeen families were represented by a single species each, eleven families were represented by two species each, five families were represented by three species each, and four families were represented by four species each. The most important families in relation to FIV were Euphorbiaceae, Myrtaceae and Araliaceae. Macaranga kilimandscharica, Syzygium guineense and Polyscias fulva were the most important species in relation to IVI. Two tree species were found to be endemic to the Albertine Rift and one species probably endemic to the Albertine Rift. The Shannon-Weiner index (H') and eveness index (J') were respectively 3.18 and 0.75. This study provides a baseline for the management of Kibira National Park. As local communities still depend on forest resources, conservation awareness-raising and education actions have to focus in nearby villages, and growing some fast-growing native trees in the vicinity of the settlement, would be helpful for local communities, this would reduce their dependence on forest resources. [less ▲]

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See detailEcosystem services provided by a large endangered primate in a forest-savanna mosaic landscape
Trolliet, Franck ULg; Serckx, Adeline ULg; Forget, Pierre-Michel et al

in Biological Conservation (2016)

Forested landscapes are increasingly affected by human activities, but little is known about the role of large endangered frugivores as seed dispersers in such ecosystems. We investigated the role played ... [more ▼]

Forested landscapes are increasingly affected by human activities, but little is known about the role of large endangered frugivores as seed dispersers in such ecosystems. We investigated the role played by the bonobo (Pan paniscus) in a human-altered forest-savannamosaic in Democratic Republic of the Congo. The studied groups are part of a community-based conservation programme but live at the interface with human activities. We identified dispersed species via faecal analysis, classified them into a regeneration guild and a seed size category, determined the effect of gut transit on seed germination, and the habitat use of bonobos. Bonobos dispersed intact seeds of 77 species, 80.8% of which were large-seeded (≥10mmlong), ofwhich fewcan be dispersed by sympatric frugivores. They dispersed a majority (49%) of shade-bearers that thrive in forest understory with limited amount of light, all of whichwere large-seeded. Transit had an overall positive effect on seed germination. Bonobos used various habitat types, showing preferences for understorywith intermediate light availability and dominated by woody or herbaceous vegetation. This dispersal pattern probably enhances recruitment of shadebearers, and we thus hypothesized that those species benefited from directed dispersal by bonobos. This threatened frugivore provides unique dispersal services and likely plays a paramount functional role in the regeneration of late successional forests in this mosaic landscape. Management plans should pay particular attention to the role of large and rare frugivores in human-dominated regions as their disappearance could disrupt forest succession to a climax state. [less ▲]

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See detailEffect of hunting pressure and forest fragmentation on seed dispersal of Staudtia kamerunensis (Myristicaceae) in the Western Congolian forest-savanna mosaic
Trolliet, Franck ULg; Forget, Pierre-Michel; Huynen, Marie-Claude ULg et al

Conference (2015, June 22)

Numerous studies have investigated the impact of hunting and forest fragmentation on seed dispersal processes, but few of them in Africa. The African continent, however, holds the greatest abundance of ... [more ▼]

Numerous studies have investigated the impact of hunting and forest fragmentation on seed dispersal processes, but few of them in Africa. The African continent, however, holds the greatest abundance of large frugivores on Earth and is subject to increasing levels of hunting and forest fragmentation. Frugivory and seed dispersal in the pan-tropical family Myristicaceae has been well studied in the Neotropics, but remain barely known in Afro-tropical forests. Here we investigated how hunting, forest cover, and fruit availability influence the dispersal capacities of Staudtia kamerunensis in a mosaic composed of forest patches and savannas in D.R. Congo. We selected 34 fertile female S. kamerunensis trees distributed, at a landscape scale (300 km²), across 5 sites characterized by a gradient of hunting pressures and density of the study trees. The trees varied in size and surrounding forest cover (patch and corridors). We quantified the percentages of seed dispersal failure using litter trap and fruit remains during the entire 2013 fruiting season, and identified fruit eaters through focal observations. The most frequently observed frugivore was the White-thighed Hornbill (Bycanistes albotibialis). Our GLMM analyses show that increasing hunting pressure, decreasing abundance of B. albotibialis and decreasing forest cover near focal trees significantly increased dispersal failure. The limited forest cover of some patches, resulting from the highly fragmented feature of the landscape, and hunting pressure, are likely to impact negatively the abundance of B. albotibialis. Consequently, we suggest the dispersal system reached saturation because of a lack of effective seed dispersal away from parent trees. [less ▲]

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See detailChanges in Activity Patterns and Intergroup Relationships After a Significant Mortality Event in Commensal Long- Tailed Macaques (Macaca Fascicularis) in Bali, Indonesia
Brotcorne, Fany ULg; Fuentes, Agustin; Wandia, I Nengah et al

in International Journal of Primatology (2015), 36(3), 548566

Little is known regarding behavioral and social responses of free-ranging primates to demographic changes emerging from significant mortality events. Here, we report on the activity patterns and ... [more ▼]

Little is known regarding behavioral and social responses of free-ranging primates to demographic changes emerging from significant mortality events. Here, we report on the activity patterns and intergroup sociospatial relationships in a commensal population of long-tailed macaques (Macaca fascicularis) in Bali, Indonesia, that underwent a significant mortality event in summer 2012. During the period of interest, we noted heightened mortality in three of the five social groups present in this population, with adult females and juveniles experiencing higher mortality rates than adult and subadult males. Limited diagnostic data regarding pathogen identification and a lack of any conclusive etiology of the deaths prevent our ascertainment of the agent(s) responsible for the observed mortality, but given the characteristics of the event we assume it was caused by a transmissible disease outbreak. Comparing the pre- and postmortality event periods, we found significant differences in activity patterns, including a decreased proportion of affiliation in adult females. This result is likely indicative of enhanced social instability induced by the high mortality of adult females that constitute the stable core of macaque social structure. A higher social tension between groups after the mortality event was indicated by more frequent and intense agonistic intergroup encounters. Intergroup conflict success was inversely proportional to the rate of mortality a group suffered. Our results illustrate how changes in demographic structure caused by significant mortality events may have substantial consequences on behavior and social dynamics in primate groups and at the level of a population. [less ▲]

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See detailFood provioning influences ranging patterns in northern pigtailed macaques (Macaca leonina)
Huynen, Marie-Claude ULg; Savini, Tommaso ULg; Asensio, Norberto et al

in International Journal of Primatology (2015, January)

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See detailMonkey business: Inter-group differences in the object/food bartering practice in Balinese macaques (Macaca fascicularis) at the Uluwatu Temple, Indonesia
Brotcorne, Fany ULg; Leca, Jean-Baptiste; Gunst, Noelle et al

in Folia Primatologica : International Journal of Primatology = Internationale Zeitschrift für Primatologie = Journal international de Primatologie (2015), 86

While there is increasing evidence for the social transmission of behavioural innovations and intergroup behavioural variation in a wide range of nonhuman primate taxa, some behavioural domains (e.g ... [more ▼]

While there is increasing evidence for the social transmission of behavioural innovations and intergroup behavioural variation in a wide range of nonhuman primate taxa, some behavioural domains (e.g., tool use) are far more represented than others (e.g., arbitrary social conventions) in the literature. Our study explores the ‘object/food bartering’ activity in the free-ranging long-tailed macaques, Macaca fascicularis, living around the Uluwatu temple, southern Bali (Indonesia). This practice occurs in two steps: after robbing temple visitors of non-edible objects, the monkeys use these objects as tokens, by returning them in exchange for specific food rewards. This spontaneous population-level activity is customary and enduring at Uluwatu, whereas it is very rare or absent at other macaque-tourism sites across the island. During a fourmonth study in 2010 at Uluwatu, we used the all-occurrence sampling technique to record 186 successful events of object-robbing, where 95 (51%) were followed by object/food bartering attempts. In line with the ‘needing-to-learn’ hypothesis, we found that older individuals were significantly more efficient at robbing valuable objects and more successful at exchanging them for food than younger individuals. We also found substantial differences in the frequency and form of the bartering practice (n = 95 events) among the four social groups constituting the Uluwatu population, with two groups (‘Temple’: 60% of the bartering events, ‘Tear’: 34%) being responsible for more frequent bartering events than the two other groups (‘Scarface’: 4%, ‘Nez’: 2%). We investigated the role of group-specific environmental and anthropic influences (food provisioning and degree of human presence) in such intergroup differences. Taken together, these preliminary results suggest that the bartering practice could be a local behavioural tradition in Balinese macaques. [less ▲]

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See detailModelling the distribution of key tree species used by lion tamarins in the Brazilian Atlantic forest under a scenario of future climate change
Raghunathan, Poornima ULg; François, Louis ULg; Huynen, Marie-Claude ULg et al

in Regional Environmental Change (2015), 15

We used three IPCC climate change scenarios (A1B, A2 and B1) in a dynamic vegetation model (CARAIB), to determine the potential future distribution of 75 tree species used by two endemic primate species ... [more ▼]

We used three IPCC climate change scenarios (A1B, A2 and B1) in a dynamic vegetation model (CARAIB), to determine the potential future distribution of 75 tree species used by two endemic primate species from the Brazilian Atlantic Forest (BAF). Habitat conservation is a vital part of strategies to protect endangered species, and this is a new approach to understanding how key plant species needed for survival of golden lion tamarins (Leontopithecus rosalia) and golden-headed lion tamarins (L. chrysomelas) might be affected by climate change and what changes to their distribution are likely. The model accurately predicted the current distribution of BAF vegetation types, for 66 % of the individual tree species with 70 % agreement obtained for presence. In the simulation experiments for the future, 72 out of 75 tree species maintained more than 95 % of their original distribution and all species showed a range expansion. At the biome level, we note a substantial decrease in the sub-tropical forest area. There is some fragmentation of the savannah, which is encroached mostly by tropical seasonal forest. Where the current distribution shows a large sub-tropical forest biome, it has been replaced or encroached by tropical rainforest. The results suggested that the trees may benefit from an increase in temperature, if and only if soil water availability is not altered significantly, as was the case with climate simulations that were used. However, these results must be coupled with other information to maximise usefulness to conservation since BAF is already highly fragmented and subject to high anthropic pressure. © 2014 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg. [less ▲]

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See detailFeeding ecology of bonobos living in forest-savannah mosaics: diet seasonal variation and importance of fallback foods
Serckx, Adeline ULg; Kühl, Hjalmar; Beudels-Jamar, Roseline et al

in American Journal of Primatology (2015)

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See detailExploring the multiple functions of sleeping sites in Northern Pigtail macaques (Macaca leonina)
Jose Dominguez, Juan Manuel; Asensio, Norberto; Garcia Garcia, Carmen J et al

in International Journal of Primatology (2015), 36(4), 948-966

the seasonal variation, maximizing daily activities. Overall, predator avoidance and food efficiency were the main factors influencing the selection of sleeping sites. Our observations differ from those ... [more ▼]

the seasonal variation, maximizing daily activities. Overall, predator avoidance and food efficiency were the main factors influencing the selection of sleeping sites. Our observations differ from those found in a semiprovisioned group inhabiting the same Abstract Sleeping site selection in nonhuman primates may respond to various eco- logical factors, including predation avoidance, range defense, and foraging efficiency. We studied the sleeping sites used by a group of northern pigtailed macaques on 124 nights to test these hypotheses. The macaques used 57 different sleeping sites, of which 33 were used only once. They rarely used the same site on consecutive nights. These selection patterns are consistent with an antipredatory function, but may also be related to an antipathogenic strategy. Sleeping sites were located principally in the most heavily used areas of the home range and were generally away from areas of intergroup encounters. However, some of the most heavily used sleeping sites were in the area where intergroup encounters occurred, and intergroup encounters at sleeping sites always showed high levels of agonism, indicating possible intergroup competition over sleeping sites. On 77 % of nights, the study group selected the sleeping site nearest to either the last feeding area that day or to the first feeding area used the next morning, suggesting a foraging efficiency strategy. The mean distances from the sleeping site to the last and first feeding area were 227 m and 127 m, respectively, suggesting a multiple central place foraging strategy. The macaques entered sleeping sites a mean of 27 min before sunset and left 24 min after sunrise, and these times varied in line withstudy site, which used fewer sleeping sites and reused them much more often. This difference highlights the impact anthropogenic activities may have on sleeping site selection and the flexibility of sleeping patterns in a single species. Such flexibility may have helped the tree-to-ground evolutionary transition of sleep habits in primates [less ▲]

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See detailHabitat Use by White-Thighed Colobus in the Kikélé Sacred Forest: Activity Budget, Feeding Ecology and Selection of Sleeping Trees
Djègo-Djossou, Sylvie; Koné, I; Fandohan, A.B. et al

in Primate conservation (2015), 29

Abstract: Understanding habitat preference and use is an important aspect of primate ecology, and is essential for setting conservation strategies. This study examined the activity budget, feeding ecology ... [more ▼]

Abstract: Understanding habitat preference and use is an important aspect of primate ecology, and is essential for setting conservation strategies. This study examined the activity budget, feeding ecology and selection of sleeping trees of a population of white-thighed colobus (Colobus vellerosus). A group of 18 was followed during 72 days over a full annual cycle in the Kikélé Sacred Forest of the Bassila administrative region in central Benin (West Africa). Activity budget and diet were determined using scan sampling. The structure of the habitat and the physical characteristics of sleeping trees were determined using plot surveys. Resting, feeding, moving, social interactions and other activities accounted for 56.6%, 26.3%, 13.0%, 3.3%, and 0.7% of the activity budget, respectively. The group spent more time feeding and less time moving in the dry season compared to the rainy season. The diet was composed of 35 plant species belonging to 16 families, with items including leaves, fruits, seeds, buds, bark, flowers, gum, and inflorescences. Only three tree species were used as sleeping trees: Celtis integrifolia, Cola cordifolia, and Holoptelea grandis. Our findings suggest that the monkeys prefer tall (22.53 ± SD 3.76 m) and large-trunked (112.07 ± SD 14.23 cm) sleeping trees. The results of this study can be used for sound management of the white-thighed colobus in the study area and elsewhere. [less ▲]

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See detailNon-territorial Macaques Can Range Like Territorial Gibbons When Partially Provisioned With Food
José Dominguez, Juan Manuel; Huynen, Marie-Claude ULg; Garcia, Carmen J et al

in Biotropica (2015)

Human food supplementation can affect components of animal socioecology by altering the abundance and distribution of available food. We studied the effect of food supplementation by comparing the ranging ... [more ▼]

Human food supplementation can affect components of animal socioecology by altering the abundance and distribution of available food. We studied the effect of food supplementation by comparing the ranging patterns and intergroup interactions of two groups of northern pigtailed macaques (Macaca leonina), a non-territorial primate species. One group was partially reliant on food provisioning, whereas the other group foraged wild food. We also compared the macaques’ movement with that of a group of white-handed gibbons (Hylobates lar), a territorial species inhabiting the same site. Home range, core area, and daily path lengths were significantly smaller for the semi-provisioned group than for the wild-feeding group. In contrast to wild-feeding macaques, supplemented macaques showed higher fidelity to home range, core area, and particularly to the region where human food was most accessible and abundant. The rela- tionship of daily path length and home range indicated a low defendability index for wild-feeding macaques; the higher index for the semi-provisioned group was consistent with the territorial pattern found in gibbons. Semi-provisioned macaques showed further traits of territoriality with aggression during intergroup encounters. These findings indicate that human modification of food availability can sig- nificantly affect movement patterns and intergroup competition in macaques. The observed ranging dynamics related to food provision- ing may decrease the efficiency of macaques as seed dispersers and increase predation on their home range, and thus have important consequences for plant regeneration and animal diversity. [less ▲]

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See detailCharacterization of Nest Sites of Chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes schweinfurthii) in Kibira National Park, Burundi
Hakizimana, Dismas; Hambuckers, Alain ULg; Brotcorne, Fany ULg et al

in African Primates (2015), 10

Abstract: Kibira National Park is the only site in Burundi that harbors a large number of chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes schweinfurthii). While information on factors influencing the selection of nest sites ... [more ▼]

Abstract: Kibira National Park is the only site in Burundi that harbors a large number of chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes schweinfurthii). While information on factors influencing the selection of nest sites by chimpanzees is available for other locations of the species’ range, this information is lacking for Kibira National Park. This is mainly due to the political troubles that prevailed in the country from 1993 until 2007, making study there difficult. To better protect this chimpanzee population, it is crucial to survey nest sites to identify the tree species, physical characteristics of the trees and habitat type that chimpanzees preferentially use for nesting. Therefore, in this study, we investigated: 1) the tree species used by chimpanzees for building their nests; 2) nest tree availability in the study area; 3) whether chimpanzee selection of a nest tree is based on physical characteristics such as diameter at breast height, lowest branch height, tree size and crown height; and 4) whether chimpanzees choose their nest sites according to topography and canopy types. We collected data monthly along 16 transects of 3 km each, from September 2011 to February 2013 (18 months). However, data related to the measurements of nests and nest trees were collected for only the last 12 months, from March 2012 to February 2013. We identified tree species used for nesting, and measured physical characteristics of trees used as opposed to surrounding trees unused. The results showed that chimpanzees select certain tree species to build their nests. Among the 32 species of trees bearing nests, chimpanzees used 12 species significantly more frequently than expected and 11 species significantly less frequently than expected. In addition, trees bearing nests were significantly larger and taller than the surrounding trees and had higher lowest branch and bigger canopies. [less ▲]

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