References of "Huybrechts, P"
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See detailEffect of uncertainty in surface mass balance–elevation feedback on projections of the future sea level contribution of the Greenland ice sheet
Edwards, T.; Fettweis, Xavier ULg; Gagliardini, O. et al

in Cryosphere (The) (2014), 8

We apply a new parameterisation of the Greenland ice sheet (GrIS) feedback between surface mass balance (SMB: the sum of surface accumulation and surface ablation) and surface elevation in the MAR ... [more ▼]

We apply a new parameterisation of the Greenland ice sheet (GrIS) feedback between surface mass balance (SMB: the sum of surface accumulation and surface ablation) and surface elevation in the MAR regional climate model (Edwards et al., 2014) to projections of future climate change using five ice sheet models (ISMs). The MAR (Modèle Atmosphérique Régional: Fettweis, 2007) climate projections are for 2000–2199, forced by the ECHAM5 and HadCM3 global climate models (GCMs) under the SRES A1B emissions scenario. The additional sea level contribution due to the SMB–elevation feedback averaged over five ISM projections for ECHAM5 and three for HadCM3 is 4.3% (best estimate; 95% credibility interval 1.8–6.9%) at 2100, and 9.6% (best estimate; 95% credibility interval 3.6–16.0%) at 2200. In all results the elevation feedback is significantly positive, amplifying the GrIS sea level contribution relative to the MAR projections in which the ice sheet topography is fixed: the lower bounds of our 95% credibility intervals (CIs) for sea level contributions are larger than the "no feedback" case for all ISMs and GCMs. Our method is novel in sea level projections because we propagate three types of modelling uncertainty – GCM and ISM structural uncertainties, and elevation feedback parameterisation uncertainty – along the causal chain, from SRES scenario to sea level, within a coherent experimental design and statistical framework. The relative contributions to uncertainty depend on the timescale of interest. At 2100, the GCM uncertainty is largest, but by 2200 both the ISM and parameterisation uncertainties are larger. We also perform a perturbed parameter ensemble with one ISM to estimate the shape of the projected sea level probability distribution; our results indicate that the probability density is slightly skewed towards higher sea level contributions. [less ▲]

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See detailSensitivity of Greenland ice sheet projections to model formulations
Goelzer, H.; Huybrechts, P.; Furst, J. et al

in Journal of Glaciology (2013), 59(216), 733749

Physically based projections of the Greenland ice sheet contribution to future sea-level change are subject to uncertainties of the atmospheric and oceanic climatic forcing and to the formulations within ... [more ▼]

Physically based projections of the Greenland ice sheet contribution to future sea-level change are subject to uncertainties of the atmospheric and oceanic climatic forcing and to the formulations within the ice flow model itself. Here a higher-order, three-dimensional thermomechanical ice flow model is used, initialized to the present-day geometry. The forcing comes from a high-resolution regional climate model and from a flowline model applied to four individual marine-terminated glaciers, and results are subsequently extended to the entire ice sheet. The experiments span the next 200 years and consider climate scenario SRES A1B. The surface mass-balance (SMB) scheme is taken either from a regional climate model or from a positive-degree-day (PDD) model using temperature and precipitation anomalies from the underlying climate models. Our model results show that outlet glacier dynamics only account for 6–18% of the sea-level contribution after 200 years, confirming earlier findings that stress the dominant effect of SMB changes. Furthermore, interaction between SMB and ice discharge limits the importance of outlet glacier dynamics with increasing atmospheric forcing. Forcing from the regional climate model produces a 14–31% higher sea-level contribution compared to a PDD model run with the same parameters as for IPCC AR4. [less ▲]

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See detailClimat: nous n'avons pas de temps à perdre
Berger, A; Callens, I; Bouckaert, T et al

Article for general public (2012)

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See detailASsessment of modelling uncertainties in long-TERm climate and sea level change projections"Aster" : final report
Fichefet, T; Loutre, M.-F.; Goosse, H. et al

Report (2012)

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See detailEvaluating climate model performance with various parameter sets using observations over the recent past
Loutre, M.-F.; Mouchet, Anne ULg; Fichefet, T. et al

in Climate of the Past (2011), 7

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See detailImpact of Greenland and Antarctic ice sheet interactions on climate sensitivity
Goelzer, H.; Huybrechts, P.; Loutre, M.-F. et al

in Climate Dynamics (2011), 37(5-6), 1005-1018

We use the Earth system model of intermediate complexity LOVECLIM to show the effect of coupling interactive ice sheets on the climate sensitivity of the model on a millennial time scale. We compare the ... [more ▼]

We use the Earth system model of intermediate complexity LOVECLIM to show the effect of coupling interactive ice sheets on the climate sensitivity of the model on a millennial time scale. We compare the response to a 2xCO2 warming scenario between fully coupled model versions including interactive Greenland and Antarctic ice sheet models and model versions with fixed ice sheets. For this purpose an ensemble of different parameter sets have been defined for LOVECLIM, covering a wide range of the model's sensitivity to greenhouse warming, while still simulating the present-day climate and the climate evolution over the last millennium within observational uncertainties. Additional freshwater fluxes from the melting ice sheets have a mitigating effect on the model's temperature response, leading to generally lower climate sensitivities of the fully coupled model versions. The mitigation is effectuated by changes in heat exchange within the ocean and at the sea-air interface, driven by freshening of the surface ocean and amplified by sea-ice-related feedbacks. The strength of the effect depends on the response of the ice sheets to the warming and on the model's climate sensitivity itself. With the ensemble approach in this study we cover a wide range of possible model responses. [less ▲]

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See detailAssessment of modelling uncertainties in long-term climate projections: the ASTER project
Loutre, M. F.; Mouchet, Anne ULg; Fichefet, T. et al

Conference (2010, October)

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See detailEarth and sea-level change projections with the Earth system model of intermediate complexity LOVECLIM
Goelzer, H.; Huybrechts, P.; Loutre, M. F. et al

Conference (2010, May)

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See detailDescription of the Earth system model of intermediate complexity LOVECLIM version 1.2
Goosse, H.; Brovkin, V.; Fichefet, T. et al

in Geoscientific Model Development (2010), 3(2), 603-633

The main characteristics of the new version 1.2 of the three-dimensional Earth system model of intermediate complexity LOVECLIM are briefly described. LOVECLIM 1.2 includes representations of the ... [more ▼]

The main characteristics of the new version 1.2 of the three-dimensional Earth system model of intermediate complexity LOVECLIM are briefly described. LOVECLIM 1.2 includes representations of the atmosphere, the ocean and sea ice, the land surface (including vegetation), the ice sheets, the icebergs and the carbon cycle. The atmospheric component is ECBilt2, a T21, 3-level quasi-geostrophic model. The ocean component is CLIO3, which consists of an ocean general circulation model coupled to a comprehensive thermodynamic-dynamic sea-ice model. Its horizontal resolution is of 3° by 3°, and there are 20 levels in the ocean. ECBilt-CLIO is coupled to VECODE, a vegetation model that simulates the dynamics of two main terrestrial plant functional types, trees and grasses, as well as desert. VECODE also simulates the evolution of the carbon cycle over land while the ocean carbon cycle is represented by LOCH, a comprehensive model that takes into account both the solubility and biological pumps. The ice sheet component AGISM is made up of a three-dimensional thermomechanical model of the ice sheet flow, a visco-elastic bedrock model and a model of the mass balance at the ice-atmosphere and ice-ocean interfaces. For both the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets, calculations are made on a 10 km by 10 km resolution grid with 31 sigma levels. LOVECLIM1.2 reproduces well the major characteristics of the observed climate both for present-day conditions and for key past periods such as the last millennium, the mid-Holocene and the Last Glacial Maximum. However, despite some improvements compared to earlier versions, some biases are still present in the model. The most serious ones are mainly located at low latitudes with an overestimation of the temperature there, a too symmetric distribution of precipitation between the two hemispheres, and an overestimation of precipitation and vegetation cover in the subtropics. In addition, the atmospheric circulation is too weak. The model also tends to underestimate the surface temperature changes (mainly at low latitudes) and to overestimate the ocean heat uptake observed over the last decades. [less ▲]

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See detailModel sensitivities and carbon cycle - climate feedbacks: a study with an Earth System Model
Mouchet, Anne ULg; Loutre, M. F.; Goelzer, H. et al

Poster (2009, November)

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See detailAssessment of modelling uncertainties in long-term climate and sea level change projections "Aster"
Fichefet, T.; Loutre, M.-F.; Goosse, H. et al

Report (2009)

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See detailHydrologic response of the Greenland ice sheet: the role of oceanographic warming
Hanna, E.; Cappelen, J.; Fettweis, Xavier ULg et al

in Hydrological Processes (2009), 23(1), 7-30

The response of the Greenland ice sheet to ongoing climate change remains an area of great uncertainty, with most previous studies having concentrated on the contribution of the atmosphere to the ice mass ... [more ▼]

The response of the Greenland ice sheet to ongoing climate change remains an area of great uncertainty, with most previous studies having concentrated on the contribution of the atmosphere to the ice mass-balance signature. Here we systematically assess for the first time the influence of oceanographic changes on the ice sheet. The first part of this assessment involves a statistical analysis and interpretation of the relative changes and variations in sea-surface temperatures (SSTs) and air temperatures around Greenland for the period 1870-2007. This analysis is based on HadISST1 and Reynolds OI.v2 SST analyses, in situ SST and deeper ocean temperature series, surface-air-temperature records for key points located around the Greenland coast, and examination of atmospheric pressure and geopotential height from NCEP/NCAR reanalysis. Second, we carried out a novel sensitivity experiment in which SSTs were perturbed as input to a regional climate model, and document the resulting effects on simulated Greenland climate and surface mass balance. We conclude that sea-surface/ocean temperature forcing is not sufficient to strongly influence precipitation/snow accumulation and melt/runoff of the ice sheet. Additional evidence from meteorological reanalysis suggests that high Greenland melt anomalies of summer 2007 are likely to have been primarily forced by anomalous advection of warm air masses over the ice sheet and to have therefore had a more remote atmospheric origin. However, there is a striking correspondence between ocean warming and dramatic accelerations and retreats of key Greenland outlet glaciers in both southeast and southwest Greenland during the late 1990s and early 2000s. [less ▲]

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See detailCarbon Cycle and Climate Sensitivity in an Earth System Model
Mouchet, Anne ULg; Loutre, M.; Fichefet, T. et al

Poster (2008, December)

The sensitivity of the potential feedbacks between climate and biogeochemical cycles (BGC) is adressed with the help of LOVECLIM, a global three-dimensional Earth system model of intermediate complexity ... [more ▼]

The sensitivity of the potential feedbacks between climate and biogeochemical cycles (BGC) is adressed with the help of LOVECLIM, a global three-dimensional Earth system model of intermediate complexity. Key physical or biogeochemical parameters of LOVECLIM are varied within their range of uncertainty in order to provide an ensemble of parameter sets resulting in contrasted climate and global carbon cycle sensitivities. The selected climate parameter sets lead to a climate sensitivity ranging from 2 to 4°C and a reduction of the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (MOC) ranging from 20 to 60% after 1 kyr in response to identical external forcings. The key parameters for the carbon cycle were chosen among those with the largest impact on the marine biogeochemical cycle and on the response of atmospheric CO2 to emission scenario. We then analyze the results of freshwater hosing experiments in which both the climate parameters and the BGC parameters are modified. These experiments allow to examine the impact of changes in climate sensitivity and of MOC reduction over the biogeochemical cycles as well as to assess the potential feedback from the carbon cycle onto the climate. A decreasing MOC directly impacts the ocean biogeochemistry. Most of the model setups show a decline in export production although some parameter sets yield reorganisation of the large scale ocean circulation, which leads to different behaviour of the ocean biogeochemistry. The atmospheric carbon is also affected by a decrease of the MOC. While most parameter sets cause a modest increase in atmospheric CO2, consecutive to the decrease of the continental vegetation, some model versions exhibit an amplification of the atmospheric CO2 response to the forcing. The mechanisms leading to the different responses for the different parameter sets are examined and discussed. [less ▲]

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See detailOcean biogeochemical cycles and climate sensitivity in an Earth system model
Mouchet, Anne ULg; Loutre, M. F.; Fichefet, T. et al

Conference (2008, October)

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See detailOcean biogeochemical cycles and climate sensitivity in an Earth system model
Mouchet, Anne ULg; Loutre, M. F.; Fichefet, T. et al

Conference (2008, April)

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See detailModeling the influence of Greenland ice sheet melting on the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation during the next millennia
Driesschaert, E.; Fichefet, T.; Goosse, H. et al

in Geophysical Research Letters (2007), 34(10),

A three-dimensional Earth system model of intermediate complexity including a dynamic ice sheet component has been used to investigate the long-term evolution of the Greenland ice sheet and its effects on ... [more ▼]

A three-dimensional Earth system model of intermediate complexity including a dynamic ice sheet component has been used to investigate the long-term evolution of the Greenland ice sheet and its effects on the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC) in response to a range of stabilized anthropogenic forcings. Our results suggest that the Greenland ice sheet volume should experience a significant decrease in the future. For a radiative forcing exceeding 7.5 W m(-2), the modeled ice sheet melts away within 3000 years. A number of feedbacks operate during this deglaciation, implying a strong nonlinear relationship between the radiative forcing and the melting rate. Only in the most extreme scenarios considered, the freshwater flux from Greenland into the surrounding oceans ( of ca. 0.1 Sv during a few centuries) induces a noticeable weakening of the AMOC in the model. [less ▲]

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See detailFuture ocean carbon cycle: a study of feedbacks with the LOVECLIM model
Mouchet, Anne ULg; Driesschaert, E.; Brovkin, V. et al

Poster (2006, February)

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See detailLOVECLIM, a three-dimensional model of the Earth system for investigating long-term climate changes
Driesschaert, E.; Brovkin, V.; Fichefet, T. et al

Conference (2003, September)

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See detailLOVECLIM, a three-dimensional model of the Earth system for investigating long-term climate changes
Driesschaert, E.; Fichefet, T.; Goosse, G. et al

Poster (2003, April 08)

A three-dimensional global model of the Earth system suitable for studying the long-term evolution of climate (LOVECLIM) has been recently developed. This model is made up of a coarse-resolution three ... [more ▼]

A three-dimensional global model of the Earth system suitable for studying the long-term evolution of climate (LOVECLIM) has been recently developed. This model is made up of a coarse-resolution three-dimensional atmosphere-sea-ice-ocean model (ECBILT-CLIO), a dynamical model of the continental biosphere (VECODE), a comprehensive model of the oceanic carbon cycle (LOCH), and a high-resolution thermomechanical model of the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets (AGISM). The atmospheric component has the big advantage that it has been simplified to a level that makes runs on a multi-century time-scale computationaly feasible, while still being capable of producing results that, on the whole, are comparable to those of atmospheric general circulation models. The performance of the coupled model is evaluated by performing ensemble simulations over the period 1500-2000 and by comparing the model results to available climate reconstructions. In these simulations, the following forcings are taken into consideration : the variations in solar irradiance, the volcanic activity, the anthropogenic emissions of CO2, and the changes in concentration of other greenhouse gases and sulphate aerosols resulting from human activities. In the future, the model will be used to investigate the evolution of climate and sea level over the third millennium. [less ▲]

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