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See detailDiurnal thermosphere scale height from MEX/SPICAM grazing limb data
Stiepen, Arnaud ULg; Gérard, Jean-Claude ULg; Bougher, S et al

Conference (2014, July 01)

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See detailAnomalous OI-989 Å intensity profile: solving an old mystery.
Hubert, Benoît ULg; Gérard, Jean-Claude ULg; Shematovich, Valery I. et al

Poster (2012, December 06)

Sounding rocket measurements conducted in 1988 under high solar activity conditions had revealed that the intensity of the thermospheric OI emission at 989 Å presents an anomalous vertical profile ... [more ▼]

Sounding rocket measurements conducted in 1988 under high solar activity conditions had revealed that the intensity of the thermospheric OI emission at 989 Å presents an anomalous vertical profile. Observation presents an intensity much higher than what can be expected compared with theoretical results including the photochemical sources of excited oxygen and the radiative transfer of the photons of the OI-989 sextuplet especially above the exobase. Attempts were conducted to clarify the discrepancy by including the non-thermal O(3P) population that appears around the exobase and higher, and that can scatter Doppler-shifted photons of the line profile farther from the rest wavelength. All attempts based on detail modeling of the photochemical processes and radiative transfer revealed unable to account for the discrepancy. Recently the FUV and EUV solar flux has been obtained at very high spectral resolution with the SOHO-SUMER instrument, revealing a significant solar oxygen emission at 989 Å, i.e. a source of photons that had never been accounted for before. In this study, we compute the radiative transfer of the OI-989 Å multiplet including the photochemical sources of excited oxygen, the scattering of incident solar photons and the effect of non-thermal atoms. We find a good agreement with the previous sounding rocket observation, solving the old mystery. We also compare the model simulations with the observations of the STP-78 satellite to better determine the relative importance of the various parameters at work in the radiative transfer of the OI-989 Å multiplet. [less ▲]

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See detailKuaFu: exploring the Sun-Earth connection
Milan, Steve; Dunlop, Malcolm; Fazakerley, Andrew et al

in Astronomy and Geophysics (2012), 53

Steve Milan and the KuaFu team explain why this space mission will provide space weather data that will help to understand and mitigate the risks it poses to our increasingly technological society.

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See detailJupiter system Ultraviolet Dynamics Explorer (JUDE), an instrument proposed for the ESA-JUICE mission
Grodent, Denis ULg; Bunce, Emma J.; Renotte, Etienne ULg et al

Report (2012)

In the proposal that follows we present a detailed concept for the science case, instrument requirements, technical design, calibration and operations, management structure, and financial plan for the ... [more ▼]

In the proposal that follows we present a detailed concept for the science case, instrument requirements, technical design, calibration and operations, management structure, and financial plan for the Jupiter system Ultraviolet Dynamics Experiment (JUDE), which will provide an outstanding solution to the UV instrumentation requirements for the JUICE mission. The JUDE instrument will represent a novel technical capability in UV instrumentation for planetary science, and will deliver the first true UV imaging capability beyond Earth orbit. The JUDE instrument design consists of two separate channels – the imaging channel (ImaC) and the spectrograph channel (SpeC), neither of which has any moving parts. This simple combination of two autonomous channels allows a true image and a spectrum at FUV wavelengths to be obtained simultaneously, allowing science goals to be realised which are not possible with a traditional scanning-slit imaging-spectrograph design The international consortium assembled to build the JUDE instrument is formed of two institutes from two European countries, and one from the United States. Prof. Denis Grodent (Université de Liège, Belgium) will act as the PI for the entire instrument team and the ULg/CSL team will provide a substantial hardware contribution to the instrument in the form of the optics, coatings, and Data Processing Unit (DPU). Dr Emma Bunce (University of Leicester, UK) will act as Co-PI for the instrument and the UoL team will supply the Micro-Channel Plate (MCP) detectors and read-out electronics. Prof. John Clarke (Co-I) of Boston University, USA will provide the grating element for the spectral channel of the instrument, in addition to instrument calibration activities. The science Co-Is are gathered from multiple institutes/nations including Belgium, UK, Germany, Italy, and the United States (see Part 1 for the full team list). Collectively, the team have decades of expertise in the areas of outer planet magnetospheres, planetary auroral and atmospheric emissions and surface UV observations from multiple platforms including Cassini UVIS, Juno UVS, Hubble Space Telescope, and numerous terrestrial missions. The team also have roles on non-UV instruments which will maximise the interpretation of the JUDE data. The two instrument channels are built on proven and robust technology with much flight heritage (e.g. Juno, Cassini, BepiColombo, IMAGE, ROSAT, Chandra, Voyager, Freja, DE-1, Swift). More specifically, the optics and focal plane detector proposed for the JUDE instrument are widely based on previous designs by CSL, at the ULg and UoL, for the FUV Spectro-Imager on the NASA IMAGE spacecraft, the UV Spectrograph on the NASA Juno mission to Jupiter, and the ROSAT Wide Field Camera. The data return from the instrument will greatly benefit the European and international science communities in planetary and terrestrial sciences, and the knowledge obtained will be generally applicable to broader astrophysics disciplines (e.g. extrasolar planetary physics). In answering the UV science objectives for the JUICE mission the JUDE instrument will clearly address the ESA Cosmic Vision Themes 1: What are the conditions for planet formation and the emergence of life? and 2: How does the Solar System work? The JUDE images (in particular) provide a clear path towards a high-level related programme of education and public outreach which the JUDE team are well equipped and keen to exploit. The JUDE instrument will contribute to all of the UV-related science objectives of JUICE, plus additional science objectives not listed in the Science Requirements Matrix. - At Ganymede and other moons (Europa and Callisto) JUDE will contribute directly to breakthroughs in the following scientific areas: 1) the characterisation of local environment, specifically through the first investigation of the morphology and variation of Ganymede’s aurora. A clear understanding of the auroral and atmospheric emissions at Ganymede will provide vital information on their formation mechanisms and will contribute to studies of the interaction of the Ganymede magnetosphere with Jupiter’s magnetosphere; 2) the first detailed observations of the satellites’ atmospheric (exosphere/ionosphere) composition and structure through measurements of their atmospheric emission and absorption spectra during multiple stellar occultation opportunities; and 3) the study of the satellites surface composition using surface reflectance measurements. The measurements at UV wavelengths are essential because they allow the study of the relationship between the satellites’ surface weathering, their atmospheres and the external environment which is mainly affected by the surrounding Jovian magnetosphere. By carefully studying processes at the surface and in the satellites’ atmospheres together, JUDE will provide the information required to distinguish between two classes of compositional heterogeneities at the satellites’ surfaces: 1) heterogeneities that arise from interaction with the external environment; 2) heterogeneities that arise from dynamical interaction with the subsurface. - With respect to Jupiter, JUDE will: 1) provide “state of the art” measurements of the Jovian atmospheric dynamics and transport through high temporal and spatial resolution auroral imaging; 2) allow a new understanding of the Jovian magnetosphere as a fast rotator through interpretation of the Jovian aurora as direct evidence for the 3D magnetosphere dynamics – a view which is continuously available in the planet’s upper atmosphere (independent of the spacecraft location within the magnetosphere); 3) investigate the magnetosphere as a giant accelerator through observations of the field-aligned current systems responsible for acceleration of electrons (and production of aurora); 4) discover the plasma sources and sinks of the moons through auroral imaging of the moon footprints in Jupiter’s atmosphere as a witness of the electromagnetic interactions taking place; 5) obtain new information on Jupiter’s atmospheric structure and composition through multiple stellar occultation opportunities. In addition, JUDE will make remote observations of the Io torus emissions and will provide the first in situ observation of the variability of the torus, over the lifetime of the mission, providing important information about the internal activity of the moon. JUDE offers a unique opportunity to obtain the first concurrent datasets of the different coupled elements of the Jupiter system: Io's atmosphere, aurora, the plasma torus, the Jovian plasma sheet and the Jovian aurora. The JUDE imaging and spectral channels are both designed to capture FUV lines from sulphur ions in the Io plasma torus. Finally, JUDE’s remote sensing capability offers an exciting opportunity to discover the Europa “plume” activity that may be present, through limb observations during flybys and from more distant observing locations. The Ganymede-focused and moon related science objectives will be addressed in the Ganymede orbit phase and during the multiple moon flybys, whilst the Jupiter science will be predominantly achieved during the Jupiter Equatorial Phases and during the high-inclination phase. The JUDE UV imager and spectrograph will produce discovery level science at Ganymede and the first true 2D UV images from Jupiter orbit. The exceptional JUICE trajectory affords many opportunities for breakthrough science discoveries in accordance with the SciRD; in addition to those, it provides unprecedented opportunities to directly witness the electromagnetic connection between Ganymede and Jupiter by making the first simultaneous UV observations of the respective atmospheres within the JUDE field-of-view. This is possible as a direct consequence of the JUDE true imaging capability. To successfully meet the science requirements outlined above, the JUDE ImaC has a spatial resolution of 20 arcsec over a circular field-of-view with 6˚ diameter, which allows a 100 km spatial resolution on Jupiter from Ganymede orbital distances (and 20 m resolution on Ganymede from 200 km, for example). JUDE’s ImaC mirrors and detector window will be covered with multilayer coatings which efficiently select a narrow bandpass from 130 to 143 nm, to allow measurements of the faint Oxygen lines at 130.4 nm and 135.6 nm in Ganymede’s (and other moon’s) atmosphere. This bandpass also allows observations of the SIV lines (between 140.5 and 142.4 nm) emitted within the Io plasma torus and in Io’s atmosphere. The bright Jovian emissions will also be suppressed within this bandpass which will necessarily limit the count rate to an acceptable level. The Ly-α line at 122 nm will be largely excluded as will the reflected sunlight longward of 150 nm. The sensitivity of the ImaC is 50 Rayleigh (at 3-sigma). The SpeC has a spectral resolution of 0.5 nm in order to meet the requirements of the SciRD, and has a field-of-view which is a 6˚ x 0.1˚ slit co-aligned with, and centred on, the ImaC circular field-of-view. The lower wavelength of the SpeC bandpass is set to ~110 nm in order to include the bright Ly-α line (useful to study the H corona) in a region of reduced transmission. The upper wavelength limit, ~195 nm, is such that transmission is slowly decreasing in the 180-195 nm spectral region, allowing measurements of the moon’s albedos beyond 165 nm, as well as the detection of compounds such as CO2, SO2, O2, O3, H2CO3 and H2O2 by comparing JUDE reflectance spectra to those obtained in laboratory studies. FUV emission lines from S and O are also observable within the bandpass and B-type stars emitting within this waveband will allow occultation experiments to be performed, to determine the composition and structure of the moon’s atmospheres and the detection of a possible Europa plume. The same is true for the Jovian atmosphere for which attenuation by H2 and hydrocarbons allows determination of the atmospheric structure. The sensitivity of the SpeC is 10 R/nm (at 3-sigma). The JUDE instrument channels: ImaC and the co-aligned SpeC, are both operating within the 110–195 nm range. Each channel has independent optics and detector elements, providing a level of redundancy such that loss of either imager or spectrograph does not constitute an entire loss of science. In contrast to more conventional (e.g. scanning or pushbroom) imaging spectrographs, JUDE can provide high time resolution (<1 second) high throughput images over a wide field of view (6° diameter) with no time variation across the field – a capability which is critical in gaining a better understanding of the complex dynamical processes taking place in the Jovian magnetosphere. The primary optic in each channel is a multilayer-coated mirror operating at normal incidence, with flight heritage in the form of the scan mirror in the Ultraviolet Spectrograph (UVS) now en-route to Jupiter onboard JUNO. The imaging channel uses a secondary mirror to of a similar type to focus the image onto the focal plane detector, while in the spectrograph channel, the secondary is a spherical, holographic grating. The spectrograph design is simple, with heritage in airglow spectrographs flown on terrestrial UV missions, and the Imaging UV Spectrograph for MAVEN. The grating element is produced by Jobin-Yvon, who have produced diffraction gratings for major missions including SOHO and HST. Each channel includes an identical microchannel plate (MCP) detector with the robust, radiation-tolerant performance required for a mission in the formidable environment of Jupiter. Such detectors are well proven, having flown on many missions including ROSAT (UoL heritage). They have also operated in the vicinity of Jupiter, in the focal plane of the UV spectrograph onboard the Voyager probes. The detector readout is a new type of capacitive division image charge readout (C-DIR; invented by Dr Jon Lapington) which offers, simultaneously, high spatial resolution and high count rate performance. Adaptive signal processing capabilities allow JUDE to accommodate the very wide dynamic range expected, from observations of Jupiter’s auroral ovals which emit with intensities of mega Rayleighs, to the weak (few tens of Rayleigh) emissions found at Ganymede. The readout structure is simple and robust, and has already been demonstrated in laboratory trials, while the electronics chain has its heritage in particle physics detectors, and has therefore been designed with radiation tolerance as a primary consideration. Pre-launch and in-flight calibrations will be implemented to assure that the JUDE data are suitable for quantitative scientific analysis. The proposed JUDE configuration successfully meets the scientific objectives of the JUICE mission. Our decision to implement an imaging channel instead of covering the MUV waveband increases the whole mission’s scientific output while remaining compliant with the MPDD. Due to its high-temporal resolution read-out system, JUDE is capable of producing volumes of data that are incompatible with the limited telemetry allocated to the UV instrument, even after a modest compression factor is applied. We therefore have proposed a mode of operation (the JUDE reference mode) which takes 1 minute snapshots over an observation opportunity (for example during a flyby sequence). Using this reference mode, and taking the maximum count rate estimates for the various targets, we find that the JUDE data volume is compliant with the tight allocation for the UV instrumentation of 40 GBytes/year The JUDE design presented in this proposal is above the mass allocation. We believe that all components of our design are necessary to reach the scientific goals of JUICE mission and that any major changes (such as the descope of a channel) will be at the considerable expense of the expected science return. However, further optimisation will be performed during the Phase A to bring JUDE into the allocated mass envelope while compromising its scientific return only slightly. We propose an efficient management structure with clearly delineated responsibilities. The Principal Investigator, Prof. Denis Grodent (Be) will take on the responsibilities as specified in the JUICE payload Announcement of Opportunity, supported closely by the Co-PI Dr Emma Bunce (UK) and by the team of Co-Investigators. The contribution of each country is represented by lead Co-Investigators: Prof. John Clarke (Boston University), Dr. Candy Hansen (PSI), and Dr Xianzhe Jia (University of Michigan), and Dr Nigel Bannister (UK) as CoI and Instrument Scientist (see Figure 1 below). The philosophy has been to assign well-defined tasks to each institute with an overall project manager to coordinate the efforts. The Consortium Project Manager (Etienne Renotte, CSL) will execute the managerial tasks relevant to the instrument development. The Product and Quality Assurance management will be implemented by all hardware contributors. Each consortium institute has a local project manager for their respective work packages, reporting to the Consortium Project Manager. The outreach potential of JUDE’s instantaneous wide field images is enormous. The potential PhD students of 2030 who we hope to educate and inspire with JUDE images and spectra are currently 3 years old; their supervisors are in secondary school. The team regards the educational aspects of the instrument and data as particularly important, and we plan a comprehensive JUDE/JUICE programme of outreach to schools and to the public, as part of the project and one which will be initiated upon selection. The national funding agency of Belgium serves as the Lead Funding Agency (LFA) for the JUDE instrument. The letters of endorsement from Belgium and United Kingdom are included in this proposal. Although the agencies endorse their respective national contributions, funding will be secured after the selection of the instrument proposal, according to the usual procedure. [less ▲]

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See detailCassini-UVIS observation of dayglow FUV emissions of carbon in the thermosphere of Venus
Hubert, Benoît ULg; Gérard, Jean-Claude ULg; Gustin, Jacques ULg et al

in Icarus (2012), 220

We analyze FUV spatially-resolved dayglow spectra obtained at 0.37 nm resolution by the UVIS instrument during the Cassini flyby of Venus. The intensities of the ultraviolet multiplets of carbon at 126.1 ... [more ▼]

We analyze FUV spatially-resolved dayglow spectra obtained at 0.37 nm resolution by the UVIS instrument during the Cassini flyby of Venus. The intensities of the ultraviolet multiplets of carbon at 126.1, 156.1 and 165.7 nm are determined using a least squares fit technique applied to all dayglow spectra recorded by UVIS along the Cassini track. These intensities are compared with the results of a full radiative transfer model of these emissions, that includes the known photochemical sources of photons and resonant scattering of sunlight. The carbon density profile of the Venus thermosphere has never been directly measured and is taken from a model. We find a serious disagreement between these observations and modeling that can be accounted for by applying a scaling factor to the carbon column. This needed scaling factor is found to increase monotonically with solar zenith angle, suggesting a possible photochemical origin to the disagreement, possibly involving the photochemistry of molecular oxygen to which the carbon density is highly sensitive. [less ▲]

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See detailMeasurements of the helium 584 Å airglow during the Cassini flyby of Venus
Gérard, Jean-Claude ULg; Gustin, Jacques ULg; Hubert, Benoît ULg et al

in Planetary and Space Science (2011), 59

The helium resonance line at 584 Å has been observed with the UltraViolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) Extreme Ultraviolet channel during the flyby of Venus by Cassini at a period of high solar activity ... [more ▼]

The helium resonance line at 584 Å has been observed with the UltraViolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) Extreme Ultraviolet channel during the flyby of Venus by Cassini at a period of high solar activity. The brightness was measured along the disk from the morning terminator up to the bright limb near local noon. The mean disk intensity was ˜320 R, reaching ˜700 R at the bright limb. These values are slightly higher than those determined from previous observations. The sensitivity of the 584 Å intensity to the helium abundance is analyzed using recent cross-sections and solar irradiance measurements at 584 Å. The intensity distribution along the UVIS footprint on the disk is best reproduced using the EUVAC solar flux model and the helium density distribution from the VTS3 empirical model. It corresponds to a helium density of 8×10[SUP]6[/SUP] cm[SUP]-3[/SUP] at the level of where the CO[SUB]2[/SUB] is 2×10[SUP]10[/SUP] cm[SUP]-3[/SUP]. [less ▲]

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See detailEUV spectroscopy of the Venus dayglow with UVIS on Cassini
Gérard, Jean-Claude ULg; Hubert, Benoît ULg; Gustin, Jacques ULg et al

in Icarus: International Journal of Solar System Studies (2011), 211

We analyze EUV spatially-resolved dayglow spectra obtained at 0.37 nm resolution by the UVIS instrument during the Cassini flyby of Venus on 24 June 1999, a period of high solar activity level. Emissions ... [more ▼]

We analyze EUV spatially-resolved dayglow spectra obtained at 0.37 nm resolution by the UVIS instrument during the Cassini flyby of Venus on 24 June 1999, a period of high solar activity level. Emissions from OI, OII, NI, CI and CII and CO have been identified and their disc average intensity has been determined. They are generally somewhat brighter than those determined from the observations made with the HUT spectrograph at a lower activity level, We present the brightness distribution along the foot track of the UVIS slit of the OII 83.4 nm, OI 98.9 nm, Lyman-ß + OI 102.5 nm and NI 120.0 nm multiplets, and the CO C-X and B-X Hopfield-Birge bands. We make a detailed comparison of the intensities of the 834 nm, 989 nm, 120.0 nm multiplets and CO B-X band measured along the slit foot track on the disc with those predicted by an airglow model previously used to analyze Venus and Mars ultraviolet spectra. This model includes the treatment of multiple scattering for the optically thick OI, OII and NI multiplets. It is found that the observed intensity of the OII emission at 83.4 nm is higher than predicted by the model. An increase of the O[SUP]+[/SUP] ion density relative to the densities usually measured by Pioneer Venus brings the observations and the modeled values into better agreement. The calculated intensity variation of the CO B-X emission along the track of the UVIS slit is in fair agreement with the observations. The intensity of the OI 98.9 nm emission is well predicted by the model if resonance scattering of solar radiation by O atoms is included as a source. The calculated brightness of the NI 120 nm multiplet is larger than observed by a factor of ˜2-3 if photons from all sources encounter multiple scattering. The discrepancy reduces to 30-80% if the photon electron impact and photodissociation of N[SUB]2[/SUB] sources of N([SUP]4[/SUP]S) atoms are considered as optically thin. Overall, we find that the O, N[SUB]2[/SUB] and CO densities from the empirical VTS3 model provide satisfactory agreement between the calculated and the observed EUV airglow emissions. [less ▲]

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See detailA superposed epoch investigation of the relation between magnetospheric solar wind driving and substorm dynamics with geosynchronous particle injection signatures
Boakes, P. D.; Milan, S. E.; Abel, G. A. et al

in Journal of Geophysical Research. Space Physics (2011), 116

We report a superposed epoch analysis of the hemispheric open magnetic flux, maximum nightside auroral intensity, geomagnetic activity, and solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field conditions around ... [more ▼]

We report a superposed epoch analysis of the hemispheric open magnetic flux, maximum nightside auroral intensity, geomagnetic activity, and solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field conditions around the time of substorm onset for three distinct categories of substorms defined by their energetic particle injection signatures. Substorms identified from global auroral imagery are classified into one of three categories based on their energetic particle injection signatures as seen at geosynchronous orbit by the Los Alamos National Laboratory spacecraft. Category 1 events are associated with a “classic” substorm injection, category 2 events show varied activity (i.e., energetic enhancements not following the evolution expected for classic substorms), and category 3 events show no apparent injection activity. The superposed epoch analysis reveals that the three distinct particle injection categories exhibit distinct differences in the level and continuity of magnetospheric driving by the solar wind, such that category 1 events can be described as classic substorm events, category 2 as continuously driven events, and category 3 as weak events. The results of this study suggest that the level and continuity of the dayside solar wind driving of the magnetosphere during substorms have a direct impact on the injection of energetic particles to geosynchronous orbit at substorm onset. These results could have considerable value in empirical predictions of the space weather environment. [less ▲]

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See detailComparison of magnetotail magnetic flux estimates based on global auroral images and simultaneous solar wind—magnetotail measurements
Shukhtina, M. A.; Sergeev, V. A.; Dejong, A. D. et al

in Journal of Atmospheric & Solar-Terrestrial Physics (2010), 72

We compared simultaneous magnetotail magnetic flux F estimates, (1) based on in situ spacecraft measurements in the tail and solar wind (F[SUB]T[/SUB]) with (2) the polar cap magnetic flux, estimated from ... [more ▼]

We compared simultaneous magnetotail magnetic flux F estimates, (1) based on in situ spacecraft measurements in the tail and solar wind (F[SUB]T[/SUB]) with (2) the polar cap magnetic flux, estimated from global auroral images (using proton-induced or electron-induced emissions, F[SUB]p[/SUB] or F[SUB]e[/SUB], respectively). Simultaneous F[SUB]p[/SUB] and F[SUB]e[/SUB] estimates gave the correlation coefficient CC=0.74, indicating that these measures are not absolutely precise. Regression analysis of F[SUB]T[/SUB] versus F[SUB]e[/SUB] and F[SUB]p[/SUB] gave CC values 0.73 and 0.50, correspondingly. F[SUB]T[/SUB] values, containing closed magnetic flux, are systematically higher than F[SUB]p[/SUB] and F[SUB]e[/SUB] by 20-30%. Motivated by diverse results, published by different groups, we reanalyzed the F dependence on the dayside merging electric field E[SUB]m[/SUB] for different dynamical states. The linear regression F(E[SUB]m[/SUB]) for substorm onsets shows a large slope ˜0.07-0.12GWb/(mV/m) for all F[SUB]p[/SUB], F[SUB]e[/SUB] and F[SUB]T[/SUB], confirming the loading-unloading substorm scheme. For SMC intervals this slope is only 0.03 GWb/(mV/m). [less ▲]

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See detailA superposed epoch analysis of auroral evolution during substorms: Local time of onset region
Milan, S. E.; Grocott, A.; Hubert, Benoît ULg

in Journal of Geophysical Research. Space Physics (2010), 115

Previous workers have shown that the magnetic local time (MLT) of substorm onset depends on the prevailing east-west component of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). To investigate the influence of ... [more ▼]

Previous workers have shown that the magnetic local time (MLT) of substorm onset depends on the prevailing east-west component of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). To investigate the influence of the onset MLT on the subsequent auroral response we perform a superposed epoch analysis of the auroral evolution during approximately 2000 substorms using observations from the FUV instrument on the Imager for Magnetopause-to-Aurora Global Exploration (IMAGE) spacecraft. We subdivide the substorms by onset latitude and onset local time before determining average auroral images before and after substorm onset, for both electron and proton aurorae. We find that during the growth phase there is preexisting auroral emission in the MLT sector of the subsequent onset. After onset the auroral bulge expands eastward and westward, but remains centered on the onset sector. Approximately 30 min after onset, during the substorm recovery phase, the peaks in electron and proton auroral emission move into the postnoon and prenoon sectors, respectively, reflecting the “average” auroral precipitation patterns determined by previous studies. Superposed epoch analysis of the interplanetary magnetic field for the substorms under study suggests that the B[SUB]Y[/SUB] component of the IMF must be biased toward positive or negative values for up to a day prior to onset for the onset MLT to be influenced. [less ▲]

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See detailAn evaluation of the contributions of the distant and near-Earth neutral lines to magnetotail reconnection rates and magnetic flux closure
Milan, Steve; Boakes, Peter; Imber, Suzanne et al

Conference (2010, May 01)

The expanding-contracting polar cap paradigm relates the dayside and nightside rates of magnetic reconnection to changes in the size of the ionospheric polar cap, the amount of magnetic flux in the ... [more ▼]

The expanding-contracting polar cap paradigm relates the dayside and nightside rates of magnetic reconnection to changes in the size of the ionospheric polar cap, the amount of magnetic flux in the magnetotail lobes, and the excitation of ionospheric and magnetospheric plasma convection. Expansions of the polar cap are the consequence of dayside reconnection, the merging of interplanetary magnetic flux with the terrestrial dipole to increase the proportion of the dipole that is open. Contractions of the polar cap are caused by magnetic reconnection in the magnetotail at a distant neutral (or X-) line (DXL) and near-Earth neutral line (NEXL), the latter especially during substorms, to reduce the open flux in the magnetosphere. There is debate surrounding the proportion of flux closure provided by the DXL and NEXL, and hence whether substorms dominate the nightside contribution to ionospheric and magnetospheric convection. This study utilizes a 7-day interval of auroral observations from the Imager for Magnetopause-to-Aurora Global Exploration (IMAGE) satellite and convection measurements by the Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (SuperDARN) to quantify the nightside rates of reconnection during substorm and non-substorm periods and hence investigate DXL and NEXL flux closure. [less ▲]

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See detailAverage auroral configuration parameterized by geomagnetic activity and solar wind conditions
Milan, S. E.; Evans, T. A.; Hubert, Benoît ULg

in Annales Geophysicae (2010), 28

Average proton and electron auroral images are compiled from three years of observations by the IMAGE spacecraft, binned according to concurrent K[SUB]P[/SUB] and upstream solar wind conditions measured ... [more ▼]

Average proton and electron auroral images are compiled from three years of observations by the IMAGE spacecraft, binned according to concurrent K[SUB]P[/SUB] and upstream solar wind conditions measured by the ACE spacecraft. The solar wind parameters include solar wind velocity, density, and pressure, interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) magnitude and orientation, and an estimate of the magnetopause reconnection rate. We use both (a) the overall variation in brightness in the images and (b) the variation in location of the aurorae with respect to the binning parameters to determine which parameters best order the auroral response. We find that the brightness varies by a factor of ~50 with K[SUB]P[/SUB], a similar amount with estimated dayside reconnection voltage, ~15 with the IMF, ~3 with solar wind density, ~2 with solar wind velocity, and ~5 with pressure. Clearly, geomagnetic activity as measured by K[SUB]P[/SUB] and auroral dynamics are closely associated. In terms of the solar wind-magnetosphere coupling that drives auroral dynamics, the IMF is of paramount importance in modulating this, with solar wind speed and density playing a lesser role. Dayside reconnection voltage, derived from the solar wind velocity and IMF magnitude and orientation, orders the data almost as well as K[SUB]P[/SUB], though we find a plateau in the auroral response between voltages of 100 and 150 kV. We also discuss changes in configuration and overall size of the average auroral oval with upstream conditions. [less ▲]

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See detailComparison of the open-closed field line boundary location inferred using IMAGE-FUV SI12 images and EISCAT radar observations
Hubert, Benoît ULg; Aikio, A. T.; Amm, O. et al

in Annales Geophysicae (2010), 28

We compare the location of the polar cap boundary (PCB) determined using two different techniques, and use them as proxies for the open-closed field line boundary (OCB). Electron temperatures from ... [more ▼]

We compare the location of the polar cap boundary (PCB) determined using two different techniques, and use them as proxies for the open-closed field line boundary (OCB). Electron temperatures from observations of the EISCAT radar facility are used to estimate the latitude of the PCB along the meridian of the EISCAT VHF beam. The second method utilizes global images of proton aurora obtained by the IMAGE satellite FUV SI12 instrument. These methods are applied to three different intervals. In two events, the agreement between the methods is good and the mean of the difference is within the resolution of the observations. In a third event, the PCB estimated from EISCAT data is located several degrees poleward of that obtained from the IMAGE FUV SI12 instrument. Comparison of the reconnection electric field estimated from the two methods shows that high-resolution measurements both in time and space are needed to capture the variations in reconnection electric field during substorm expansion. In addition to the two techniques introduced above to determine the PCB location, we also use a search for the location of the reversal of the east-west component of the equivalent current known as the magnetic convection reversal boundary (MCRB). The MCRB from the MIRACLE magnetometer chain mainly follows the motion of the polar cap boundary during different substorm phases, but differences arise near the Harang discontinuity. [less ▲]

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See detailMars ultraviolet dayglow variability: SPICAM observations and comparison with airglow model
Cox, Cédric ULg; Gérard, Jean-Claude ULg; Hubert, Benoît ULg et al

in Journal of Geophysical Research. Planets (2010), 115

Dayglow ultraviolet emissions of the CO Cameron bands and the CO[SUB]2[/SUB][SUP]+[/SUP] doublet in the Martian atmosphere have been observed with the Spectroscopy for Investigation of Characteristics of ... [more ▼]

Dayglow ultraviolet emissions of the CO Cameron bands and the CO[SUB]2[/SUB][SUP]+[/SUP] doublet in the Martian atmosphere have been observed with the Spectroscopy for Investigation of Characteristics of the Atmosphere of Mars on board the Mars Express spacecraft. A large amount of limb profiles has been obtained which makes it possible to analyze variability of the brightness as well as of the altitude of the emission peak. Focusing on one specific season (Ls = [90,180] °), we find that the average CO peak brightness is equal to 118 ± 33 kR, with an average peak altitude of 121.1 ± 6.5 km. Similarly, the CO[SUB]2[/SUB][SUP]+[/SUP] emission shows a mean brightness of 21.6 ± 7.2 kR with a peak located at 119.1 ± 7.0 km. We show that the brightness intensity of the airglows is mainly controlled by the solar zenith angle and by solar activity. Moreover, during Martian summer of year 2005, an increase of the airglow peak altitude has been observed between Ls = 120° and 180°. We demonstrate that this variation is due to a change in the thermospheric local CO[SUB]2[/SUB] density, in agreement with observations performed by stellar occultation. Using a Monte Carlo one-dimensional model, we also show that the main features of the emission profiles can be reproduced for the considered set of data. However, we find it necessary to scale the calculated intensities by a fixed factor. [less ▲]

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See detailUltraviolet aurorae and dayglow in the upper atmospheres of terrestrial planets
Gérard, Jean-Claude ULg; Hubert, Benoît ULg; Gustin, Jacques ULg et al

in 38th COSPAR Scientific Assembly (2010)

Since its discovery in 2005 with the SPICAM spectrograph on board Mars Express, the Mars aurora has been further investigated. It is caused by sporadic soft electron precipitation whose signature is ... [more ▼]

Since its discovery in 2005 with the SPICAM spectrograph on board Mars Express, the Mars aurora has been further investigated. It is caused by sporadic soft electron precipitation whose signature is clearly observed in the FUV nightglow spectrum. The characteristics of the auroral electrons have been documented with parallel observations. Dayglow UV spectra have been collected with SPICAM over several seasons. The dependence of the intensity and peak altitude of the CO Cameron bands and CO2 + doublet emissions on latitude, local time and solar activity level have been investigated and compared with the results of a FUV Mars dayglow model. Far and Extreme ultraviolet spectra have been collected with the UVIS instrument during the flyby of Venus by Cassini, in a period a high solar activity. Their analysis shows the presence of OI, OII, NI, CI, CO and CO2 + emissions, some of them not previously identified in the Venus spectrum. The intensities will be compared with those observed with the HUT spectrograph during a period of low solar activity. The excitation processes of the observed features will be discussed. Scans of the intensity variation of several EUV bright emissions such as OII 83.4 nm, OI 98.9 nm and NI 120.0 nm multiplets across the sunlit disc will be compared with the calculations of a Venus dayglow model, including multiple scattering of optically thick transitions. [less ▲]

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See detailUVIS observations of the FUV OI and CO 4P Venus dayglow during the Cassini flyby
Hubert, Benoît ULg; Gérard, Jean-Claude ULg; Gustin, Jacques ULg et al

in Icarus (2010), 207

We analyze FUV spatially-resolved dayglow spectra obtained at 0.37 nm resolution by the UVIS instrument during the Cassini flyby of Venus. We use a least-squares fit method to determine the brightness of ... [more ▼]

We analyze FUV spatially-resolved dayglow spectra obtained at 0.37 nm resolution by the UVIS instrument during the Cassini flyby of Venus. We use a least-squares fit method to determine the brightness of the OI emissions at 130.4 and OI 135.6 nm, and of the bands of the CO fourth positive system which are dominated by fluorescence scattering. We compare the brightness observed along the UVIS foot track of the two OI multiplets with that deduced from a model of the excitation of these emissions by photoelectron impact on O atoms and resonance scattering of the solar 130.4 nm emission. The large optical thickness 130.4 nm emission is accounted for using a radiative transfer model. The airglow intensities are calculated along the foot track and found to agree with the observed 130.4 nm brightness within ˜10%. The modeled OI 135.6 nm brightness is also well reproduced by the model. The oxygen density profile of the VTS3 model is found to be consistent with the observations. We find that self-absorption of the (0, v″) bands of the fourth positive emission of CO is important and we derive a CO vertical column of about 6.4 × 10[SUP]15[/SUP] cm[SUP]‑2[/SUP] in close agreement with the value provided by the VTS3 empirical atmospheric model. [less ▲]

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See detailContinuous Characterization of Growth Phase Using Ground Optical and Magnetic Data
Connors, M. G.; Lerner, R.; Fillingim, M. O. et al

Conference (2009, December 01)

The growth phase of substorms is characterized by equatorward motion of the auroral oval as manifested by optical emissions and the electrojet currents detected on the ground through magnetic ... [more ▼]

The growth phase of substorms is characterized by equatorward motion of the auroral oval as manifested by optical emissions and the electrojet currents detected on the ground through magnetic perturbations. We will demonstrate the use of an inversion procedure for magnetic data that follows the optical borders detected in the CANOPUS Churchill meridian well. Multispectral meridian scanning photometry allows identification of 486 nm H-beta emission with the equatorward edge of the evening sector growth phase electrojet, consistent with downward field-aligned current at this location. The 630 nm and 557 nm emissions due to the precipitation of electrons are identified with the more poleward regions or the poleward border, and upward field-aligned current. While these results are already known, the use of magnetic data is a new way of continuously monitoring growth phase. The identifications are supported by satellite imaging from Image and POLAR in individual cases. Despite separation of the proton and electron emissions as observed from the ground, our results are consistent with the polar cap boundary determined using proton imaging by SI12 on Image. We have also confirmed precipitation region and FAC coincidence using FAST, and corrected the electrojet position when FAST did not fly directly over the ground array, based on imaging from the high altitude satellites. [less ▲]

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See detailAn initial investigation of the magnetosphere at a system level using auroral oval radius and ring current intensity as state variables
Milan, S. E.; Hutchinson, J.; Boakes, P. D. et al

Conference (2009, December 01)

One approach to understanding the magnetosphere at a system level is to select a number of magnetospheric state variables and to examine statistically their inter-relationships and the temporal evolution ... [more ▼]

One approach to understanding the magnetosphere at a system level is to select a number of magnetospheric state variables and to examine statistically their inter-relationships and the temporal evolution of the magnetosphere through state-space. This talk outlines a first attempt at such a study, using the radius of the auroral oval, a proxy for the open flux content of the magnetosphere, and the Sym-H index, a measure of the intensity of the ring current, as the primary state variables. Using observations from the two-year period June 2000 to May 2002, the response of the state of the magnetosphere to differing solar wind inputs, and the evolution of the system state during geomagnetic storms is investigated. Our main finding is a characteristic evolution of magnetospheric state through the initial, main, and recovery phases of geomagnetic storms. We discuss our findings within the context of the expanding/contracting polar cap paradigm, in terms of a modification of substorm onset conditions by the magnetic perturbation associated with the ring current. [less ▲]

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See detailInfluences on the radius of the auroral oval
Milan, S. E.; Hutchinson, J.; Boakes, P. D. et al

in Annales Geophysicae (2009), 27

We examine the variation in the radius of the auroral oval, as measured from auroral images gathered by the Imager for Magnetopause-to-Aurora Global Exploration (IMAGE) spacecraft, in response to solar ... [more ▼]

We examine the variation in the radius of the auroral oval, as measured from auroral images gathered by the Imager for Magnetopause-to-Aurora Global Exploration (IMAGE) spacecraft, in response to solar wind inputs measured by the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) spacecraft for the two year interval June 2000 to May 2002. Our main finding is that the oval radius increases when the ring current, as measured by the Sym-H index, is intensified during geomagnetic storms. We discuss our findings within the context of the expanding/contracting polar cap paradigm, in terms of a modification of substorm onset conditions by the magnetic perturbation associated with the ring current. [less ▲]

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