References of "Honoré, Pierre"
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See detailA More Than 20% Increase in Deceased-Donor Organ Procurement and Transplantation Activity After the Use of Donation After Circulatory Death.
Le Dinh, H.; MONARD, Josée ULg; DELBOUILLE, Marie-Hélène ULg et al

in Transplantation proceedings (2014), 46(1), 9-13

BACKGROUND: Organ procurement and transplant activity from controlled donation after circulatory death (DCD) was evaluated over an 11-year period to determine whether this program influenced the ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Organ procurement and transplant activity from controlled donation after circulatory death (DCD) was evaluated over an 11-year period to determine whether this program influenced the transplant and donation after brain death (DBD) activities. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Deceased donor (DD) procurement and transplant data were prospectively collected in a local database for retrospective review. RESULTS: There was an increasing trend in the potential and actual DCD numbers over time. DCD accounted for 21.9% of the DD pool over 11 years, representing 23.7% and 24.2% of the DD kidney and liver pool, respectively. The DBD retrieval and transplant activity increased during the same time period. Mean conversion rate turning potential into effective DCD donors was 47.3%. Mean DCD donor age was 54.6 years (range, 3-83). Donors >/=60 years old made up 44.1% of the DCD pool. Among referred donors, reasons for nondonation were medical contraindications (33.7%) and family refusals (19%). Mean organ yield per DCD donor was 2.3 organs. Mean total procurement warm ischemia time was 19.5 minutes (range, 6-39). In 2012, 17 DCD and 37 DBD procurements were performed in the Liege region, which has slightly >1 million inhabitants. CONCLUSIONS: This DCD program implementation enlarged the DD pool and did not compromise the development of DBD programs. The potential DCD pool might be underused and seems to be a valuable organ donor source. [less ▲]

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See detailDONATION AFTER CIRCULATORY DEATH INCREASES THE CADAVERIC DONOR POOL
Le Dinh, H.; DE ROOVER, Arnaud ULg; SQUIFFLET, Jean-Paul ULg et al

in Transplant International (2013, December), 26(S2), 54-101

Background: There is a controversy on the possibility to increase the organ donor pool by donation-after-circulatory-death (DCD) and the possible decrease in donation-after-brain-death (DBD) by DCD ... [more ▼]

Background: There is a controversy on the possibility to increase the organ donor pool by donation-after-circulatory-death (DCD) and the possible decrease in donation-after-brain-death (DBD) by DCD programs. Our aim is to report the DCD experience at the University Hospital of Liege, Belgium, from 2002 through 2012, in a donor region of about 1 million inhabitants. Methods: The prospective organ donor and recipient databases were retrospectively reviewed. Results: 94 and 331 procurements were performed from controlled DCD and DBD donors in the time period, respectively. DCD donors contributed to 22.1% of the deceased donor (DD) organ procurement activity from Jan 2002 to Dec 2012, and up to one-third annually since 2009. DCD liver and kidneys contributed 23.7% and 24.2% of the DD liver and kidney transplantation activity, respectively. There was no decrease of the DBD procurement in the study period. In 2012, overall 54 DD were procured in the Liege region, reaching a high procurement activity.Conclusions: Controlled DCD donors are a valuable source of transplantable liver and kidney grafts, and in our experience do not adversely affect DBD organ procurement activity. [less ▲]

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See detailDONATION AFTER CIRCULATORY DEATH LIVER TRANSPLANTATION: IS DONOR AGE AN ISSUE?
DETRY, Olivier ULg; Ledinh, Heu; HONORE, Pierre ULg et al

in Transplant International (2013, December), 26(s2), 112-228

Background: Donation after circulatory death (DCD) donors > 55 years are usually not considered suitable for liver transplantation (LT). At our institute, age is not an absolute exclusion criterion to ... [more ▼]

Background: Donation after circulatory death (DCD) donors > 55 years are usually not considered suitable for liver transplantation (LT). At our institute, age is not an absolute exclusion criterion to refuse DCD liver grafts. We retrospectively compared the transplant outcome of patients receiving older DCD liver grafts to the younger ones. Methods: 70 DCD liver transplants have been performed from 2003 to 2012, which includes 32 liver grafts from younger donors <55y (group A), 20 between 56 and 69 years (group B), and 18 from older donors ≥70 years (group C). The three groups were compared in terms of donor and recipient demographics, procurement and transplantation conditions, peak laboratory values during the first post-transplant week and results at one and three years. Results are expressed as median IQR. Results: No difference other than age in donor and recipient characteristics as well as procurement conditions was noted between both groups. Median donor age of the group A was 44 (38-45) years, in group B 62 (60-64) years and 73 (71-75) in group C. Median primary warm ischemia time (WIT) were 20 (17-22), 21 (19-25) and 19 (16-23) min, respectively (NS). Median cold ischemia time (CIT) was 236 (229-294), 245 (227-290) and 210 (195-277) min, respectively (NS). Peak AST (UI/ml) was 1162 (1072-3971), 1416 (1006-2752), and 1067 (902-4037), respectively (NS). There was no primary nonfunction and one patient needed retransplantation for artery thrombosis. Biliary complications occurred similarly in both groups, without graft loss secondary to ischemic cholangiopathy. Graft and patient survivals were not different at one and three years. Conclusion: This study shows comparable results between DCD liver transplants from younger and older donors. Therefore donor age >55 years should not be a contraindication to DCD liver transplantation if other donor risk factors (such as WIT, CIT) are minimized. [less ▲]

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See detailIS ULTRA-SHORT COLD ISCHEMIA THE KEY TO ISCHEMIC CHOLANGIOPATHY AVOIDANCE IN DCD- LT?
DETRY, Olivier ULg; DE ROOVER, Arnaud ULg; Cheham, Samir et al

in Transplant International (2013, December), 26(S2), 53-98

Introduction: Donation after circulatory death (DCD) donors have been proposed to partially overcome the organ donor shortage. DCD-LT remains controversial, with reported increased risk of ischemic ... [more ▼]

Introduction: Donation after circulatory death (DCD) donors have been proposed to partially overcome the organ donor shortage. DCD-LT remains controversial, with reported increased risk of ischemic cholangiopathy leading to graft loss. The authors retrospectively reviewed a single centre experience with DCD-LT in a 9-year period. Patients and Methods: 70 DCD-LT were performed from 2003 to November 2012. All DCD procedures were performed in operative rooms. Median donor age was 59 years. Most grafts were flushed with HTK solution. Allocation was centre-based. Median total DCD warm ischemia was 19.5 min. Mean follow-up was 36 months. No patient was lost to follow-up. Results: Median MELD score at LT was 15. Median cold ischemia was 235 min. Median peak AST was 1,162 U/L. Median peak bilirubin was 31.2 mg/dL. Patient and graft survivals were 92.8% and 91.3% at one year and 79% and 77.7% at 3 years, respectively. One graft was lost due to hepatic artery thrombosis. No PNF or graft loss due to ischemic cholangiopathy was observed in this series. Causes of death were malignancies in 8 cases. Discussion: In this series, DCD LT appears to provide results equal to classical LT. Short cold ischemia and recipient selection with low MELD score may be the keys to good results in DCD LT, in terms of graft survival and avoidance of ischemic cholangiopathy. [less ▲]

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See detailEffects of Parecoxib on The Prevention of Postoperative Peritoneal Adhesions in Rats.
Arung, Willy; Jehaes, Francois; Cheramy, Jean-Paul et al

in Journal of Investigative Surgery : The Official Journal of the Academy of Surgical Research (2013), 26(6), 340-346

ABSTRACT Background: No systemic preventive therapy has been successful in inhibiting the development of postoperative peritoneal adhesions (PPAs). Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the ... [more ▼]

ABSTRACT Background: No systemic preventive therapy has been successful in inhibiting the development of postoperative peritoneal adhesions (PPAs). Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential effects of 5 day administration of parecoxib, on PPA prevention and on suture or wound healing in rats. Methods: In a model of PPAs induced by peritoneal electrical burn, 30 rats were randomized into 3 groups according to parecoxib administration route (control; intraperitoneal (IP); intramuscular (IM)). Plasma and peritoneal levels of PAI-1 and tPA were measured at T0, after 90 min of surgery (T90), and on postoperative day 10 (D10). In a cecum resection model, 20 rats were randomized into two groups (control and IP parecoxib), and abdominal wound healing and suture leakage were assessed at D10. In both models, PPAs were evaluated quantitatively and qualitatively on D10. Results: Administration of parecoxib significantly decreased the quantity (p < .05) and the severity (p < .01) of PPAs in both models. In addition, parecoxib administration did not cause healing defects or infectious complications in the two models. In the peritoneal burn model, IP or IM parecoxib administration inhibited the increase of postoperative plasma and peritoneum PAI-1 levels, an increase that was observed in the control group (p < .01). No anastomosis leakage could be demonstrated in both groups in the cecum resection model. Conclusion: This study showed that, in these rat models, parecoxib might reduce PPA formation. Confirmation of the safety of parecoxib on intestinal anastomoses is required and should be investigated in further animal models. [less ▲]

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See detailINFUSION OF THIRD-PARTY MESENCHYMAL STEM CELLS (MSC) AFTER KIDNEY AND LIVER TRANSPLANTATION: A PHASE I-II, OPEN-LABEL, CLINICAL STUDY (EudraCT 2011-001822-81 & NCT01429038)
DETRY, Olivier ULg; DELBOUILLE, Marie-Hélène ULg; LECHANTEUR, Chantal ULg et al

Poster (2013, May 30)

MSC cells have demonstrated significant immunosuppressive effects in various in vivo and in vitro studies. This study aims to be the first evaluation of the safety and tolerability of third party MSC ... [more ▼]

MSC cells have demonstrated significant immunosuppressive effects in various in vivo and in vitro studies. This study aims to be the first evaluation of the safety and tolerability of third party MSC infusion after cadaveric kidney and liver transplantation in a prospective phase I-II study, taking advantage of our centre expertise and experience in MSC use in graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) after bone marrow transplantation and using an already functioning GMP-compliant laboratory producing clinical-grade MSC. Secondary end-points will help to evaluate the immunosuppressive potential of MSC after organ transplantation, and the opportunity to develop larger randomised, controlled, phase III trials. After successful transplantation, 10 liver and 10 kidney transplant recipients under standard immunosuppression (tacrolimus, MMF, steroids) will receive an intravenous infusion of 1.5-3x106/kg of third-party MSC on post-operative day 3±2. These patients will be prospectively compared to 10 liver and 10 kidney recipients who meet the inclusion criteria but deny MSC infusion. Safety will be assessed by recording side effects, including opportunistic infections and cancers. Immunosuppressive potential will be evaluated by rejection episode rates, by graft/patient survivals, by immunohistology of 3-months kidney and 6-month liver graft biopsies and by in vitro evaluation of the immunity profile of the recipients. In a second step, reduction (kidney) and progressive weaning (liver) of immunosuppression will be attempted in recipients who received MSC. This ongoing study is supported by research grants from the CHU of Liège, University of Liège, and by the Senior Clinical Research Grant from ESOT. The first patients were included and treated in early 2012, and final results expected in late 2013. [less ▲]

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See detailIs ultra-short cold ischemia the key to ischemic cholangiopathy avoidance in DCD-LT?
DETRY, Olivier ULg; DE ROOVER, Arnaud ULg; Cheham, S et al

in Acta Chirurgica Belgica (2013, May), Supplement 113(3), 6729

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See detailIs ultra-short cold ischemia the key to IBDL avoidance in DCD-LT?
DETRY, Olivier ULg; DE ROOVER, Arnaud ULg; Ledinh, Hieu et al

Poster (2013, February 08)

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See detailLaparoscopic liver resection: a single center experience
SZECEL, Delphine ULg; DE ROOVER, Arnaud ULg; DELWAIDE, Jean ULg et al

in Surgical Endoscopy (2013), 27

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See detailIntraperitoneal Adhesions After Open or Laparoscopic Abdominal Procedure: An Experimental Study in the Rat.
Arung, Willy; Drion, Pierre ULg; Honoré, Pierre ULg et al

in Surgical Endoscopy (2013), 27

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See detailDonation after cardio-circulatory death liver transplantation.
Le Dinh; DE ROOVER, Arnaud ULg; KABA, Abdourahmane ULg et al

in World Journal of Gastroenterology (2012), 18(33), 4491-506

The renewed interest in donation after cardio-circulatory death (DCD) started in the 1990s following the limited success of the transplant community to expand the donation after brain-death (DBD) organ ... [more ▼]

The renewed interest in donation after cardio-circulatory death (DCD) started in the 1990s following the limited success of the transplant community to expand the donation after brain-death (DBD) organ supply and following the request of potential DCD families. Since then, DCD organ procurement and transplantation activities have rapidly expanded, particularly for non-vital organs, like kidneys. In liver transplantation (LT), DCD donors are a valuable organ source that helps to decrease the mortality rate on the waiting lists and to increase the availability of organs for transplantation despite a higher risk of early graft dysfunction, more frequent vascular and ischemia-type biliary lesions, higher rates of re-listing and re-transplantation and lower graft survival, which are obviously due to the inevitable warm ischemia occurring during the declaration of death and organ retrieval process. Experimental strategies intervening in both donors and recipients at different phases of the transplantation process have focused on the attenuation of ischemia-reperfusion injury and already gained encouraging results, and some of them have found their way from pre-clinical success into clinical reality. The future of DCD-LT is promising. Concerted efforts should concentrate on the identification of suitable donors (probably Maastricht category III DCD donors), better donor and recipient matching (high risk donors to low risk recipients), use of advanced organ preservation techniques (oxygenated hypothermic machine perfusion, normothermic machine perfusion, venous systemic oxygen persufflation), and pharmacological modulation (probably a multi-factorial biologic modulation strategy) so that DCD liver allografts could be safely utilized and attain equivalent results as DBD-LT. [less ▲]

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See detailIntraperitoneal Adhesions After Open or Laparoscopic Abdominal Procedure: An Experimental Study in the Rat.
Arung, Willy; Drion, Pierre ULg; CHERAMY-BIEN, Jean-Paul ULg et al

in Journal of Laparoendoscopic & Advanced Surgical Techniques. Part A. (2012), 22(7), 651-657

Abstract Background: Adhesion formation is common after abdominal surgery. The incidence and severity of adhesion formation following open or laparoscopic surgery remain controversial. The role of CO(2 ... [more ▼]

Abstract Background: Adhesion formation is common after abdominal surgery. The incidence and severity of adhesion formation following open or laparoscopic surgery remain controversial. The role of CO(2) pneumoperitoneum is also widely discussed. This study aimed to compare adhesion formation following peritoneal injury by electrocoagulation performed through open or laparoscopic procedures in a rat model. Materials and Methods: Sixty male rats were randomized to undergo a 1.5-cm peritoneal injury with unipolar cautery under general anesthesia: open surgery (Group A, n=20), laparoscopic surgery with CO(2) pneumoperitoneum (Group B, n=20), and laparoscopic surgery with air pneumoperitoneum (Group C, n=20). Duration of the procedures was fixed at 90 minutes in all groups, and pneumoperitoneum pressure was kept at 10 mm Hg. Ten days later, the animals underwent a secondary laparotomy to score peritoneal adhesions using qualitative and quantitative parameters. Results: Forty-five rats developed at least one adhesion: 95% in Group A, 83% in Group B, and 55% in Group C (P<.01; Group C versus Group A, P<.01). According to number, thickness, tenacity, vascularization, extent, type, and grading according to the Zuhkle classification, no significant difference was observed between Groups A and B. The distribution of adhesions after open surgery was significantly different than after laparoscopic surgery (P<.001). It is interesting that Group C rats developed significantly fewer adhesions at the traumatized site, and their adhesions had less severe qualitative scores compared with those after open surgery (P<.01). Conclusions: In this animal model, CO(2) laparoscopic surgery did not decrease the formation of postoperative adhesion, compared with open surgery. The difference with the animals operated on with air pneumoperitoneum emphasizes the role of CO(2) in peritoneal injury leading to adhesion formation. [less ▲]

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See detailCategories of donation after cardiocirculatory death.
DETRY, Olivier ULg; Le Dinh, Hieu ULg; NOTERDAEME, Timothée et al

in Transplantation Proceedings (2012), 44(5), 1189-95

The interest in donation after cardiocirculatory death (DCD) was renewed in the early 1990s, as a means to partially overcome the shortage of donations after brain death. In some European countries and in ... [more ▼]

The interest in donation after cardiocirculatory death (DCD) was renewed in the early 1990s, as a means to partially overcome the shortage of donations after brain death. In some European countries and in the United States, DCD has become an increasingly frequent procedure over the last decade. To improve the results of DCD transplantation, it is important to compare practices, experiences, and results of various teams involved in this field. It is therefore crucial to accurately define the different types of DCD. However, in the literature, various DCD terminologies and classifications have been used, rendering it difficult to compare reported experiences. The authors have presented herein an overview of the various DCD descriptions in the literature, and have proposed an adapted DCD classification to better define the DCD processes, seeking to provide a better tool to compare the results of published reports and to improve current practices. This modified classification may be modified in the future according to ongoing experiences in this field. [less ▲]

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See detailINTRA-TUMORAL HETEROGENEITY AND RATIONAL SELECTION OF ANTIGENS FOR TARGETED THERAPY OF LIVER METASTASES
Turtoi, Andrei ULg; Blomme, Arnaud ULg; Delvaux, David ULg et al

in Acta Chirurgica Belgica (2012, May), 112(3), 8953

Objectives: Targeted therapies of liver metastases are gaining a major stake in current and future treatment options. However, the malignant lesions are heterogeneous in nature offering niches for cancer ... [more ▼]

Objectives: Targeted therapies of liver metastases are gaining a major stake in current and future treatment options. However, the malignant lesions are heterogeneous in nature offering niches for cancer cells causing treatment resistance and relapse. Therefore, a rational strategy is needed to select targetable antigens that would overcome this intra-tumoral heterogeneity. Methods: After ethical committee approval, 48 fresh liver metastases of colorectal origin were prospectively collected from patients undergoing liver resection. Here we macroscopically divided the lesion in different zones and generated a unique quantitative picture of the proteome heterogeneity in colorectal carcinoma liver metastases. Particular focus was laid on accessible proteins, a protein subclass comprising cell membrane associated and extracellular proteins. Accordingly, the tissues were ex-vivo biotinylated, affinity purified and analyzed for each zone separately using nano-UPLC-MSe proteomics technique. In total over 1500 unique proteins were statistically divided into different patterns of expression. Results: We have generated a quantitative picture of the proteome heterogeneity in colorectal carcinoma liver metastases. The study offers insight into novel targets but also antigens against which the antibodies are already involved in clinical trials or treatment of liver metastases. Extensive clustering and validation experiments highlight novel markers that offer the potential to homogeneously cover the metastatic lesion and become better targets. Conclusions: Two such antigens, LTBP2 and TGFBI were selected for functional analysis in colorectal carcinoma cells. In vitro and in vivo experiments showed that in particular TGFBI is relevant for migration and proliferation capacity of colorectal cancer cells. The suppression of this protein led to significant inhibition of tumor growth, crystalizing it as bona fide target for the development of anti-metastases therapies. [less ▲]

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See detailLiège experience in donation after cardiac death liver transplantation: 2003-2011
Le Dinh, Hieu ULg; DELWAIDE, Jean ULg; MONARD, Josée ULg et al

in Acta Chirurgica Belgica (2012, May), 112(3), 6811

Objectives: Results of DCD-LT at the University Hospital of Liège were evaluated from 2003 to 2011. Methods: Medical records of 56 DCD liver recipients were retrospectively reviewed with regard to patient ... [more ▼]

Objectives: Results of DCD-LT at the University Hospital of Liège were evaluated from 2003 to 2011. Methods: Medical records of 56 DCD liver recipients were retrospectively reviewed with regard to patient and graft survivals and biliary complications. Mean follow-up was 26.4 months. Mean donor age was 56.3±14.5 years (25 - 83). Donor causes of death were due to anoxia (51.8%), stroke (32.1%) and head trauma (14.3%). Mean WIT, CIT and suture time were 20.5±7.1min (10 – 39), 265.6±85.1min (105 – 576), and 40.8±7.8 min (25 – 61), respectively. 95% of liver grafts were locally shared. HTK was the most commonly used perfusion solution (86%). Mean recipient age was 56.6±10.5 years (29 – 73). Indications for LT included ESLD (53.6%) and HCC (46.6%). Mean MELD score at transplant was 15.6±6.1points (6 – 40). Results: No primary non-function grafts. Mean peak serum AST and bilirubin levels were 2520±3621UI/L and 50.2±49.2mg/L, respectively. Eight patients (14.3%) developed biliary complications. No intra-hepatic bile duct strictures or re-transplantation. Global patient and graft survival was 92.6% at 3 months, 92.6% at 1 year, 73.8% at 3 years and 60% at 5 years. Death-censored patient and graft survival at the corresponding time points was 92.6%, 92.6%, 87.7% and 87.7%. Thirteen liver grafts were lost during follow-up exclusively due to recipient deaths. The rate of HCC recurrence was 33.3%. Conclusions: Controlled DCD donors are a valuable source of transplantable liver grafts. Primary results are encouraging and apparently as good as those from brain-dead donation LT essentially due to short WIT and CIT. [less ▲]

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See detailLaparoscopic liver resection: a single center experience
SZECEL, Delphine ULg; DE ROOVER, Arnaud ULg; DELWAIDE, Jean ULg et al

in Acta Chirurgica Belgica (2012, May), 112(3), 631

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See detailEFFECT OF PARECOXIB, A SELECTIVE COX-2 INHIBITOR, IN THE PREVENTION OF POSTOPERATIVE ADHESIONS IN A RAT MODEL
Arung Kalau, Willy ULg; Drion, Pierre ULg; CHERAMY-BIEN, Jean-Paul ULg et al

in Acta Chirurgica Belgica (2012, May), 112(3), 8444

Objectives: Postoperative peritoneal adhesions are frequent after abdominal surgery. Many preventive agents have been tried in animal models and in clinical trials, but up to now, there has been no ... [more ▼]

Objectives: Postoperative peritoneal adhesions are frequent after abdominal surgery. Many preventive agents have been tried in animal models and in clinical trials, but up to now, there has been no definitive strategy to prevent their formation. In this study, the effectiveness of parecoxib (Dynastat®), a selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor, in preventing experimental intra-abdominal adhesions in rats was studied. Methods: Thirty male rats who underwent a primary surgical procedure aiming at inducing peritoneal injury to produce intraabdominal adhesion, were randomized in three groups: (A) control group, no therapy; (B) intraperitoneal (IP) parecoxib group; (C) intramuscular (IM) parecoxib group. Ten days later, a xyphopubic midline incision was performed and the whole abdominal cavity was explored to score the peritoneal adhesions. Results: Twenty-three rats developed adhesions, 9 (100%) in group A, 7 (70%) in group B and 4 (40%) in group C (P=0.01). The extent and severity scores of adhesion were significantly lower in groups B and C than those in control group (p<0.001). Type of adhesions was measured at 2.25 ± 0.67 in group A, 1.20 ± 0.86 in group B and 0.82 ± 0.80 in group C. This was significantly different between group A and B (p<0.001), between A and C (p<0.001). But no significant difference was found between group B and C (p=0.17). Conclusions: In this study, we found a significant effect on parecoxib in the prevention of postoperative adhesions. But, without avoiding completely the formation of adhesion, parecoxib reduces significantly extent and severity of postoperative adhesions in rats treated with IP or IM parecoxib administration. [less ▲]

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See detailINTRAPERITONEAL ADHESIONS AFTER OPEN OR LAPAROSCOPIC ABDOMINAL PROCEDURE: AN EXPERIMENTAL STUDY IN THE RAT
Arung, Willy; Drion, Pierre ULg; CHERAMY-BIEN, Jean-Paul ULg et al

in Acta Chirurgica Belgica (2012, May), 112(3), 8546

Objectives: Adhesion formation is common after abdominal surgery. The incidence and severity of adhesion formation following open or laparoscopic surgery remain controversial. The role of CO2 ... [more ▼]

Objectives: Adhesion formation is common after abdominal surgery. The incidence and severity of adhesion formation following open or laparoscopic surgery remain controversial. The role of CO2 pneumoperitoneum is also largely discussed. This study aimed to compare adhesion formation following peritoneal injury by electrocoagulation performed through open or laparoscopic procedures in a rat model. Methods: Sixty male rats were randomized to undergo a 1.5cm peritoneal injury with unipolar cautery under general anesthesia: open surgery (group A, n=20), laparoscopic surgery with CO2 pneumoperitoneum (group B, n=20) and laparoscopic surgery with air pneumoperitoneum (group C, n=20). Duration of the procedures was fixed at 90 minutes in all groups, and pneumoperitoneum pressure at 10mmHg. Ten days later, the animals underwent a secondary laparotomy to score peritoneal adhesions using qualitative and quantitative parameters. Results: Forty-five rats developed at least one adhesion, respectively 95% in group A, 83% in group B and 55% in group C (P<0.01; Group C vs Group A, P<0.01). According to number, thickness, tenacity, vascularization, extent, type, and grading according to Zühkle classification, no significant difference was observed between groups A and B. The distribution of adhesions after open surgery was significantly different than after laparoscopic surgery (P<0.001). Interestingly, group C rats developed significantly less adhesions at the traumatized site, and their adhesions had less severe qualitative scores compared to open surgery (P<0.01). Conclusions: In this animal model, CO2 laparoscopic surgery did not decrease the formation of postoperative adhesion, compared to open surgery. The difference with the animals operated with air pneumoperitoneum emphasizes the role of CO2 in peritoneal injury leading to adhesion formation. [less ▲]

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See detailMULTICENTER BELGIAN SURVEY ON DONOR MORBIDITY AND MORTALITY IN ADULT-TO-ADULT LIVING DONOR LIVER TRANSPLANTATION
Troisi, Roberto I; Vogelaers, Dirk; Lerut, Jan et al

in Transplant International (2011, September), 24(2), 13-13

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