References of "Hochedez, J. F"
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See detailThe Extreme Ultraviolet Imager (EUI) onboard the SOLAR ORBITER mission
Rochus, Pierre ULg; Halain, Jean-Philippe ULg; Renotte, Etienne ULg et al

in A3. 4. Space-based Astronomy (2009)

Solar Orbiter will for the first time study the Sun with a full suite of in-situ and remote sensing instruments from inside 0.25 AU and will provide imaging and spectral observations of the Sun’s polar ... [more ▼]

Solar Orbiter will for the first time study the Sun with a full suite of in-situ and remote sensing instruments from inside 0.25 AU and will provide imaging and spectral observations of the Sun’s polar regions, from out of the ecliptic. This proximity to the Sun will also have the significant advantage that the spacecraft will fly in near synchronization with the Sun’s rotation, allowing observations of the solar surface and heliosphere to be studied from a near co-rotating vantage point for almost a complete solar rotation. The mission’s ambitious characteristics draw severe constraints on the design of these instruments. The scientific objectives of Solar Orbiter rely ubiquitously on the Extreme EUV Imager suite (EUI). The EUI instrument suite on board of Solar Orbiter is composed of two high resolution imagers (HRI), one at Lyman α and one dual band at the two 174 and 335 EUV passbands in the extreme UV, and one dual band full-sun imager (FSI) working alternatively at the two 174 and 304 EUV passbands. In all the units, the image is produced by a mirror-telescope, working in nearly normal incidence. The EUV reflectivity of the optical surfaces is obtained with specific EUV multilayered coatings, providing the spectral selection of the EUV units (1HRI and 1 FSI). The spectral selection is complemented with very thin filters rejecting the visible and IR radiation. Due to its orbit, EUI / Solar Orbiter will see 20 solar constants and an entrance baffle to limit the solar heat input into EUI is needed. The paper presents the scientific objectives of EUI and also covers the EUI instrument development plan which will require some trade-off between existing and promising technologies. [less ▲]

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See detailThe DynaMICCS perspective. A mission for a complete and continuous view of the Sun dedicated to magnetism, space weather and space climate
Turck-Chièze, S.; Lamy, P.; Carr, C. et al

in Experimental Astronomy (2009), 23

The DynaMICCS mission is designed to probe and understand the dynamics of crucial regions of the Sun that determine solar variability, including the previously unexplored inner core, the radiative ... [more ▼]

The DynaMICCS mission is designed to probe and understand the dynamics of crucial regions of the Sun that determine solar variability, including the previously unexplored inner core, the radiative/convective zone interface layers, the photosphere/chromosphere layers and the low corona. The mission delivers data and knowledge that no other known mission provides for understanding space weather and space climate and for advancing stellar physics (internal dynamics) and fundamental physics (neutrino properties, atomic physics, gravitational moments...). The science objectives are achieved using Doppler and magnetic measurements of the solar surface, helioseismic and coronographic measurements, solar irradiance at different wavelengths and in-situ measurements of plasma/energetic particles/magnetic fields. The DynaMICCS payload uses an original concept studied by Thalès Alenia Space in the framework of the CNES call for formation flying missions: an external occultation of the solar light is obtained by putting an occulter spacecraft 150 m (or more) in front of a second spacecraft. The occulter spacecraft, a LEO platform of the mini sat class, e.g. PROTEUS, type carries the helioseismic and irradiance instruments and the formation flying technologies. The latter spacecraft of the same type carries a visible and infrared coronagraph for a unique observation of the solar corona and instrumentation for the study of the solar wind and imagers. This mission must guarantee long (one 11-year solar cycle) and continuous observations (duty cycle > 94%) of signals that can be very weak (the gravity mode detection supposes the measurement of velocity smaller than 1 mm/s). This assumes no interruption in observation and very stable thermal conditions. The preferred orbit therefore is the L1 orbit, which fits these requirements very well and is also an attractive environment for the spacecraft due to its low radiation and low perturbation (solar pressure) environment. This mission is secured by instrumental R and D activities during the present and coming years. Some prototypes of different instruments are already built (GOLFNG, SDM) and the performances will be checked before launch on the ground or in space through planned missions of CNES and PROBA ESA missions (PICARD, LYRA, maybe ASPIICS). [less ▲]

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See detailPerformance of diamond detectors for VUV applications
BenMoussa, A.; Theissen, A.; Scholze, F. et al

in Nuclear Instruments & Methods in Physics Research. Section A, Accelerators, Spectrometers, Detectors and Associated Equipment (2006), 568(1), 398-405

We report on experimental results with photodetectors made of diamond. the Large Yield Radiometer (LYRA), will use such detectors for the first time for a solar physics space instrument. A (LYRA) set of ... [more ▼]

We report on experimental results with photodetectors made of diamond. the Large Yield Radiometer (LYRA), will use such detectors for the first time for a solar physics space instrument. A (LYRA) set of measurement campaigns was carried out to obtain their XUV-to-VIS characterization (responsivity, linearity, stability, homogeneity). The responsivity has been measured from the XUV to the NIR, in the wavelength range 1-1127 nm (i.e. 1240-1.1 eV). The diamond detectors exhibit a photoresponse varying in the 40-75 mA/W range at 7 nm and demonstrate a visible rejection ratio (200 versus 500 nm) larger than four orders of magnitude. We show that diamond photodetectors are sensitive sensors for VUV photons, stable within a few percent, with a good linearity and moderate homogeneity. © 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailSolar-blind diamond detectors for LYRA, the solar VUV radiometer on board PROBA II
Benmoussa, A.; Hochedez, J. F.; Schmutz, W. K. et al

in Experimental Astronomy (2003), 16(3), 141-148

Fabrication, packaging and experimental results on the calibration of metal-semiconductor-metal (MSM) photodetectors made on diamond are reported. LYRA (Lyrnan-alpha RAdiometer onboard PROBA-2) will use ... [more ▼]

Fabrication, packaging and experimental results on the calibration of metal-semiconductor-metal (MSM) photodetectors made on diamond are reported. LYRA (Lyrnan-alpha RAdiometer onboard PROBA-2) will use diamond detectors for the first time in space for a solar physics instrument. A set of measurement campaigns was designed to obtain the XUV-to-VIS responsivity of the devices and other characterizations. The measurements of responsivity in EUV and VUV spectral ranges (40-240 nm) have been carried out by the Physkalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) in Germany at the electron storage ring BESSY II. The longer wavelength range from 210 to 1127 nm was measured with monochromatic light by using a Xe-lamp at IMO-IMOMEC. The diamond detectors exhibit a photoresponse which lie in the 35-65 mA/W range at 200 nm (corresponding to an external quantum efficiency of 20-40%) and indicate a visible rejection ratio (200-500 nm) higher than four orders of magnitude. [less ▲]

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See detailMAGRITTE / SPECTRE : the Solar Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) aboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory
Rochus, Pierre ULg; Defise, Jean-Marc ULg; Halain, Jean-Philippe ULg et al

in AGU Fall Meeting Abstracts (2002), 21

The Solar Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) aboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory will characterize the dynamical evolution of the solar plasma from the chromosphere to the corona, and will follow the ... [more ▼]

The Solar Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) aboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory will characterize the dynamical evolution of the solar plasma from the chromosphere to the corona, and will follow the connection of plasma dynamics with magnetic activity throughout the solar atmosphere. The AIA consists of 7 high resolution imaging telescopes in the following spectral bandpasses: 1215 \x8F Ly-a, 304 \x8F He II, 629 \x8F OV, 465 \x8F Ne VII, 195 \x8F Fe XII (includes Fe XXIV), 284 \x8F Fe XV, and 335 \x8F Fe XVI. The telescopes are grouped by instrumental approach: the Magritte Filtergraphs (R. Magritte, famous 20th Century Belgian Surrealistic Artist), five multilayer EUV channels with bandpasses ranging from 195 to 1216 \x8F, and the SPECTRE Spectroheliograph with one soft-EUV channel at OV 629 \x8F. They will be simultaneously operated with a 10-second imaging cadence. These two instruments, the electronic boxes and two redundant Guide Telescopes (GT) constitute the AIA suite. They will be mounted and coaligned on a dedicated common optical bench. The GTs will provide pointing jitter information to the whole SHARPP assembly. This poster presents the selected technologies, the different challenges, the trade-offs to be made in phase A, and the model philosophy. From a scientific viewpoint, the unique combination high temporal and spatial resolutions with the simultaneous multi-channel capability will allow Magritte/SPECTRE to explore new domains in the dynamics of the solar atmosphere, in particular the fast small-scale phenomena. We show how the spectral channels of the different instruments were derived to fulfill the AIA scientific objectives, and we outline how this imager array will address key science issues, like the transition region and coronal waves or flare precursors, in coordination with other SDO experiments. We finally describe the real-time solar monitoring products that will be made available for space-weather forecasting applications. [less ▲]

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See detailEIT and LASCO Observations of the Initiation of a Coronal Mass Ejection
Dere, K. P.; Brueckner, G. E.; Howard, R. A. et al

in Solar Physics (1997), 175

We present the first observations of the initiation of a coronal mass ejection (CME) seen on the disk of the Sun. Observations with the EIT experiment on SOHO show that the CME began in a small volume and ... [more ▼]

We present the first observations of the initiation of a coronal mass ejection (CME) seen on the disk of the Sun. Observations with the EIT experiment on SOHO show that the CME began in a small volume and was initially associated with slow motions of prominence material and a small brightening at one end of the prominence. Shortly afterward, the prominence was accelerated to about 100 km s[SUP]-1[/SUP] and was preceded by a bright loop-like structure, which surrounded an emission void, that traveled out into the corona at a velocity of 200 400 km s[SUP]-1[/SUP]. These three components, the prominence, the dark void, and the bright loops are typical of CMEs when seen at distance in the corona and here are shown to be present at the earliest stages of the CME. The event was later observed to traverse the LASCO coronagraphs fields of view from 1.1 to 30 Ro. Of particular interest is the fact that this large-scale event, spanning as much as 70 deg in latitude, originated in a volume with dimensions of roughly 35" (2.5 x 10[SUP]4[/SUP] km). Further, a disturbance that propagated across the disk and a chain of activity near the limb may also be associated with this event as well as a considerable degree of activity near the west limb. [less ▲]

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See detailEIT Observations of the Extreme Ultraviolet Sun
Moses, D.; Clette, Frédéric; Delaboudinière, J.-P. et al

in Solar Physics (1997), 175

The Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT) on board the SOHO spacecraft has been operational since 2 January 1996. EIT observes the Sun over a 45 x 45 arc min field of view in four emission line ... [more ▼]

The Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT) on board the SOHO spacecraft has been operational since 2 January 1996. EIT observes the Sun over a 45 x 45 arc min field of view in four emission line groups: Feix, x, Fexii, Fexv, and Heii. A post-launch determination of the instrument flatfield, the instrument scattering function, and the instrument aging were necessary for the reduction and analysis of the data. The observed structures and their evolution in each of the four EUV bandpasses are characteristic of the peak emission temperature of the line(s) chosen for that bandpass. Reports on the initial results of a variety of analysis projects demonstrate the range of investigations now underway: EIT provides new observations of the corona in the temperature range of 1 to 2 MK. Temperature studies of the large-scale coronal features extend previous coronagraph work with low-noise temperature maps. Temperatures of radial, extended, plume-like structures in both the polar coronal hole and in a low latitude decaying active region were found to be cooler than the surrounding material. Active region loops were investigated in detail and found to be isothermal for the low loops but hottest at the loop tops for the large loops. [less ▲]

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See detailEIT: Extreme-Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope for the SOHO Mission
Delaboudinière, J.-P.; Artzner, G. E.; Brunaud, J. et al

in Solar Physics (1995), 162

The Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT) will provide wide-field images of the corona and transition region on the solar disc and up to 1.5 Ro above the solar limb. Its normal incidence multilayer ... [more ▼]

The Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT) will provide wide-field images of the corona and transition region on the solar disc and up to 1.5 Ro above the solar limb. Its normal incidence multilayer-coated optics will select spectral emission lines from Fe IX (171 Å), Fe XII (195 Å), Fe XV (284 Å), and He II (304 Å) to provide sensitive temperature diagnostics in the range from 6 × 10[SUP]4[/SUP] K to 3 × 10[SUP]6[/SUP] K. The telescope has a 45 x 45 arcmin field of view and 2.6 arcsec pixels which will provide approximately 5-arcsec spatial resolution. The EIT will probe the coronal plasma on a global scale, as well as the underlying cooler and turbulent atmosphere, providing the basis for comparative analyses with observations from both the ground and other SOHO instruments. This paper presents details of the EIT instrumentation, its performance and operating modes. [less ▲]

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