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See detailModeling of the Diffusion of VOCs Emitted by Barley Roots
Hirtt, Laura ULg; Destain, Marie-France ULg; Lognay, Georges ULg et al

Poster (2012, July 02)

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See detailLes volatils racinaires de l’orge : un langage souterrain ?
Barsics, Fanny ULg; Gfeller, Aurélie ULg; Fauconnier, Marie-Laure ULg et al

Scientific conference (2011, October 13)

Cette présentation résume les avancées du projet Rhizovol après une année de travaux de recherche.

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See detailVolatile organic compounds of the roots of barley and their role in the rhizosphere
Fiers, Marie ULg; Barsics, Fanny ULg; Camerman, Marc ULg et al

Poster (2011, May 24)

Volatile organic compounds emitted by plants are known to intervene with various biotic environmental factors. Up to now, most of the studies have been focused on aerial volatiles and root liquid exudates ... [more ▼]

Volatile organic compounds emitted by plants are known to intervene with various biotic environmental factors. Up to now, most of the studies have been focused on aerial volatiles and root liquid exudates. Very few researches have been completed concerning belowground volatiles released into the rhizosphere despite their potential capacity to carry information between organisms. The Rhizovol project, started in autumn 2010, involves 5 different units of Gembloux Agro-Bio Tech collectively studying the production of belowground volatiles by barley roots underlying various biotic interactions in the rhizosphere. Some preliminary results of each partner of the project will be presented. To achieve this goal, analytical methods allowing the sampling, separation, identification and quantification of belowground volatile compounds have to be developed, taking into account their potential modifications in the rhizosphere once released by the roots. They enable the subsequent characterization and study of the interactions between barley and its rhizospheric partners chosen for this study. These interactions imply three types of organisms: beneficial organisms, pathogenic agents and plant and insect pests. Beneficial organisms can promote the growth of barley by the emission of volatiles; on the other hand barley can support their growth and metabolism. These phenomenons will be assessed by the study of 19 strains of plant growth-promoting bacteria (PGPR). Three pathogenic agents - two fungi (Fusarium culmorum and Cochliobolus sativus) and one virus (Barley yellow dwarf virus) - were chosen as they are known to cause various diseases on barley, especially on roots. The attractive or repellent effects of barley root volatiles on the pathogenic agents or their vectors, as well as the effect of volatiles on the diseases evolution will be evaluated. The project also includes several types of pests such as plants and insects. Plants can compete with barley for space and nutrients through volatile interactions. This will be assessed by the study of autotoxicity by barley itself and allelopathy with 8 weeds and a hemiparasitic plant (Rhinanthus minor). The effects of barley volatiles can also impact the severity of the attacks by insects. This part will be conducted with wireworms as they represent worldwide known pests, and aphids, through their viral vector role. Eventually, as soil characteristics can strongly influence the diffusion of volatile compounds, the diffusion behaviour of the identified volatile biomolecules through the soil will be modelled. Tritrophic interactions (e.g. insect-plant-pathogenic fungi) will be studied based on each bitrophic interaction results. Over-all, the Rhizovol project aims at improving the knowledge of interactions mediated by volatile compounds in the rhizosphere and at establishing new biocontrol methods that could contribute to integrated disease and pest management systems. [less ▲]

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See detailMesure et spatialisation des précipitations
Degre, Aurore ULg; Hirtt, Laura ULg; Beckers, Eléonore ULg

Learning material (2010)

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See detailHydrologie générale : le bassin versant
Degre, Aurore ULg; Hirtt, Laura ULg; Beckers, Eléonore ULg

Learning material (2010)

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See detailMéthodologie intégrée de détermination du débit réservé : application au cas du Crupet
Hirtt, Laura ULg

Master's dissertation (2009)

Pumping stations and dams generate modifications of rivers’ state flow of. In this work, we propose to implement and compare the results of three instream flow assessments. We are studying a Belgian river ... [more ▼]

Pumping stations and dams generate modifications of rivers’ state flow of. In this work, we propose to implement and compare the results of three instream flow assessments. We are studying a Belgian river called Crupet, which has some pumping stations on its catchment. The three methods are : the Range of Variability Approach, the Instream Flow Incremental Methodology, and the Wetted Perimeter Method. The aim of the first method is to find an instream flow such that the river conserves as much as possible its natural behaviour after pumping. This method is usually based on twenty years of flow data, before and after the construction of the pumping stations. In our case, the data were not available, especially because there are no stage gauging stations. So we had to generate hydrologic data based on some approximations and hypotheses (estimation of the quantity of water pumped on the catchment, method of regionalization). Next we use a software to analyse the alteration of thirty-three hydrologic parameters, and we formulate an equation that calculates how much water could be pumped to minimise the alteration of the parameters. The second method is based on hydrological, morphological, and biological (fish habitat) data to assess the minimum flow in a river at low water. The third method, the Wetted Perimeter Method, is used to find the minimum flow knowing the morphology of the transect (relation between wetted perimeter and flow). For the last two methods, we found the minimum flow for the studied section being equal to 1.5 m3/s. The RVA methodology recommends however a higher minimum flow and imposes to reduce the pumping, at least if all our hypotheses are correct. [less ▲]

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