References of "Hien, Truong Thi Dieu"
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See detailTemperature regimes and aphid density interactions differentially influence VOC emissions in Arabidopsis
Hien, Truong Thi Dieu ULg; Delory, Benjamin ULg; Vanderplanck, Maryse et al

in Arthropod-Plant Interactions (2014)

The effects of volatile emissions from plants exposed to individual abiotic and biotic stresses are well documented. However, the influence of multiple stresses on plant photosynthesis and defense ... [more ▼]

The effects of volatile emissions from plants exposed to individual abiotic and biotic stresses are well documented. However, the influence of multiple stresses on plant photosynthesis and defense responses, resulting in a variety of volatile profiles has received little attention. In this study, we investigated how temperature regimes in the presence and absence of the sucking insect Myzus persicae affected volatile organic compound emissions in Arabidopsis over three time periods (0-24 h, 24-48 h, and 48-72 h). Headspace solid-phase microextraction coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry was used to evaluate Arabidopsis volatile organic compounds. The results showed that under laboratory conditions, eight volatile classes [alcohols (mainly 2-ethyl-hexan-1-ol), ketone (6-methyl hept-5-en-2-one), esters (mainly (Z)-3-hexenyl acetate), aldehydes (mainly phenylacetaldehyde), isothiocyanates (mainly 4-methylpentyl isothiocyanate), terpenes (mainly (E,E)-α-farnesene), nitrile (5-(methylthio) pentanenitrile), and sulfide (dimethyl trisulfide)] were observed on plants exposed to stress combinations, whereas emissions of six volatile classes were observed during temperature stress treatments alone (with the exception of nitriles and sulfides). Aphid density at high temperature combinations resulted in significantly higher isothiocyanate, ester, nitrile and sulfide proportions. The results of the present study provide an insight into the effects of temperature - aphid interactions on plant volatile emissions. [less ▲]

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See detailVOC emissions and protein expression mediated by the interactions between herbivorous insects and Arabidopsis plant. A review
Hien, Truong Thi Dieu ULg; Heuskin, Stéphanie ULg; Delaplace, Pierre ULg et al

in Biotechnologie, Agronomie, Société et Environnement = Biotechnology, Agronomy, Society and Environment [=BASE] (2014), 18(3), 455-464

Herbivorous insects, such as phloem-sap feeders and chewers, induce resistance response in plants. There is a long-standing hypothesis that herbivores increase the emission of volatile organic compounds ... [more ▼]

Herbivorous insects, such as phloem-sap feeders and chewers, induce resistance response in plants. There is a long-standing hypothesis that herbivores increase the emission of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the Arabidopsis plant model. However, most works were restricted to the study of the regulation of plant VOC emissions and only in some cases to the effects of insects on such emissions. Often these investigations do not establish a link between quantitative and qualitative emission of plant VOCs with actual damages caused by insects. Moreover, information remain limited about the processes that occur at the protein level encoded of the host plant under stress conditions. Here, we briefly summarize the effects of specific chewing and phloem-sap feeding insects on the emission of VOCs by Arabidopsis thaliana Col-0, and review some predictions about pathogenesis-related proteins, based on current evolutionary hypotheses. Further investigation of the effects of herbivorous insects on VOC emissions and protein expression is expected to improve our knowledge about their patterns and functions in plant responses to stresses. [less ▲]

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See detailEmission of sulfur-containing volatiles from Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh Col-0 related to diamondback moth (Plutella xylostella (L.)) infestation
Hien, Truong Thi Dieu ULg; Delaplace, Pierre ULg; Francis, Frédéric ULg et al

Poster (2013, June 10)

Herbivore-infested plants often release a variety of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Here, we studied the effects of feeding Plutella xylostella (L.) (0, 3, 9, 20 pest larvae within 0-4 h and 4-8 h ... [more ▼]

Herbivore-infested plants often release a variety of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Here, we studied the effects of feeding Plutella xylostella (L.) (0, 3, 9, 20 pest larvae within 0-4 h and 4-8 h infestation, respectively) on the emission of sulfur-containing VOCs in Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh Col-0 (A.t. Col-0) by headspace solid-phase micro-extraction coupled to gas chromatography - mass spectrometry (HS-SPME-GC/MS). The analytical results showed that the relative emission of sulfur-containing metabolites increased significantly in Arabidopsis plants subjected to P. xylostella infestation according to the density and residence duration of pest larvae on shoot organs. The main compound from infested plants was dimethyl disulfide. We suggest that the correlations between the stress level (density and time infestation) and the sulfides observed in this study provide a means to understand the changes of VOCs profile of plant under chewer infestation. [less ▲]

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See detailEvaluation of the volatile emission changes from Arabidopsis thaliana Col-0 in response to temperature stress and Myzus persicae infestation interaction by HS-SPME-GC/MS
Hien, Truong Thi Dieu ULg

Poster (2013, February 08)

Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are considered to be priming agents in plant responsive defense to protect themselves against abiotic or/and biotic stresses. Such stresses often influence on plant ... [more ▼]

Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are considered to be priming agents in plant responsive defense to protect themselves against abiotic or/and biotic stresses. Such stresses often influence on plant photosynthesis and defense responses, resulting in a variety of volatile profiles. We investigated how different temperature regimes affect the VOCs emission capacity of Arabidopsis thaliana Col-0 (A.t Col-0) in the presence and absence of a sucking insect – Myzus persicae (green peach aphid). VOCs analyses were made with solid-phase micro-extraction coupled with gas chromatography - mass spectrometry (SPME- GC/MS) under controlled and various stress treatments. In response to temperature stresses, alcohols, ketones, aldehydes and terpenes were the most emitted VOCs. Moreover, the compared results showed that the percent emission of several compounds changed significantly. The interaction between temperature stresses and aphids released some new volatile components; like isothiocynates, esters, sulfur compound and nitrile. Besides, the qualitative and overall proportion of volatile blends differed significantly from plants subjected to the stress treatments within different time intervals (0-24h; 24-48h and 48-72h). Overall, both stress treatments correlated with increased or decreased levels of VOCs classes from Arabidopsis shoot organs. Knowledge of how the temperature – aphids interaction influences on VOCs emission in this study also provides interesting information for evaluating the responsive resistance in plants under natural environments. [less ▲]

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See detailImpact of Myzus persicae infestation on the volatile emission of Arabidopsis thaliana Col-0.
Hien, Truong Thi Dieu ULg; Delaplace, Pierre ULg; Francis, Frédéric ULg et al

Poster (2012, July 22)

Being members of complex communities, plants often emit a wide range of volatile organic compounds to defend themselves against insect invasions. Although many studies exist on insect-induced plant ... [more ▼]

Being members of complex communities, plants often emit a wide range of volatile organic compounds to defend themselves against insect invasions. Although many studies exist on insect-induced plant volatile emission, most of them either compare the influences of various herbivore species on one plant species or the impact of a given herbivore on several host plant species. Moreover, informations related to the influence of insect density as well as the infestation duration are still needed. Here, we showed that a sucking insect – Myzus persicae (green peach aphid) induced the volatile emission from Arabidopsis thaliana Columbia wild-type (A.thaliana Col-0) under laboratory conditions based on results obtained by solid-phase micro-extraction coupled with gas chromatography - mass spectrometry (SPME-GC/MS). The released volatile blend was discussed in relation to related biosynthesis pathways and functions. These included terpenoids, green leaf volatiles, alcohols and isothiocyanate. The qualitative and overall proportion of volatile components differed depended on the number and residence duration of aphids on leaves. By studying the effects of sucking insect stresses to plant, we not only aim to contribute to the fundamental understanding of the emission of volatile components in the interaction between plants and pests, but also to provide standardised and easy to use assays to assess A.thaliana volatile changes according to cross stresses, including both biotic and abiotic ones in ongoing experiments. [less ▲]

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