References of "Heuertz, Myriam"
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See detailPhylogeography of african timber trees
Hardy, Olivier; Daïnou, Kasso ULg; Debout, Gabriel et al

Conference given outside the academic context (2012)

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See detailCpDNA-based species identification and phylogeography: application to African tropical tree species
Duminil, Jérôme; Heuertz, Myriam; Doucet, Jean-Louis ULg et al

in Molecular Ecology (2010), 19(24), 5469-5483

Despite the importance of the African tropical rainforests as a hotspot of biodiversity, their history and the processes that have structured their biodiversity are understood poorly. With respect to past ... [more ▼]

Despite the importance of the African tropical rainforests as a hotspot of biodiversity, their history and the processes that have structured their biodiversity are understood poorly. With respect to past demographic processes, new insights can be gained through characterizing the distribution of genetic diversity. However, few studies of this type have been conducted in Central Africa, where the identification of species in the field can be difficult. We examine here the distribution of chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) diversity in Lower Guinea in two tree species that are difficult to distinguish, Erythrophleum ivorense and Erythrophleum suaveolens (Fabaceae). By using a blind-sampling approach and comparing molecular and morphological markers, we first identified retrospectively all sampled individuals and determined the limits of the distribution of each species. We then performed a phylogeographic study using the same genetic data set. The two species displayed essentially parapatric distributions that were correlated well with the rainfall gradient, which indicated different ecological requirements. In addition, a phylogeographic structure was found for E. suaveolens and, for both species, substantially higher levels of diversity and allelic endemism were observed in the south (Gabon) than in the north (Cameroon) of the Lower Guinea region. This finding indicated different histories of population demographics for the two species, which might reflect different responses to Quaternary climate changes. We suggest that a recent period of forest perturbation, which might have been caused by humans, favoured the spread of these two species and that their poor recruitment at present results from natural succession in their forest formations. [less ▲]

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See detailCan Pleistocene refuge theory explain within-species patterns of genetic diversity in African lowland rainforest trees?
Heuertz, Myriam; Savolainen, Vincent; Budde, Katharina et al

Poster (2010)

Pleistocene refuge theory holds that regions which nowadays harbour high numbers of endemic species correspond to forest refuges, where rainforest persisted through periods of adverse climatic conditions ... [more ▼]

Pleistocene refuge theory holds that regions which nowadays harbour high numbers of endemic species correspond to forest refuges, where rainforest persisted through periods of adverse climatic conditions. In order to test this theory, we surveyed geographical patterns of genetic diversity based on chloroplast DNA sequences in 15 rainforest tree species from 12 plant families in Atlantic Equatorial Africa. We found frequent geographic structure in the data sets, but no consistent pattern of genetic structure due to refugia. Species with gravity-dispersed oily seeds display low polymorphism whilst those with divergent lineages or ancient species display high polymorphism. Phylogeographical signals often correspond to taxa with divergent lineages. [less ▲]

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See detailForest refugia revisited: nSSRs and cpDNA sequences support historical isolation in a wide-spread African tree with high colonization capacity, Milicia excelsa (Moraceae)
Daïnou, Kasso ULg; Bizoux, Jean-Philippe ULg; Doucet, Jean-Louis ULg et al

in Molecular Ecology (2010)

The impact of the Pleistocene climate oscillations on the structure of biodiversity in tropical regions remains poorly understood. In this study, the forest refuge theory is examined at the molecular ... [more ▼]

The impact of the Pleistocene climate oscillations on the structure of biodiversity in tropical regions remains poorly understood. In this study, the forest refuge theory is examined at the molecular level in Milicia excelsa, a dioecious tree with a continuous range throughout tropical Africa. Eight nuclear microsatellites (nuSSRs) and two sequences and one microsatellite from chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) showed a deep divide between samples from Benin and those from Lower Guinea. This suggests both that these populations were isolated in separate geographical regions, probably for several glacial cycles of the Pleistocene, and a poor mixture of gene pools despite M. excelsa’s wind-pollination syndrome. The divide can also be related to seed dispersal patterns, which should be largely determined by the migration behaviour of M. excelsa's main seed disperser, the frugivorous bat Eidolon helvum. Within Lower Guinea, a north-south divide, observed with both markers despite weak genetic structure (nuSSRs: FST=0.035, cpDNA: GST=0.506), suggested the existence of separate Pleistocene refugia in Cameroon and the Gabon/Congo region. We inferred a pollen-to-seed dispersal distance ratio of 1.76, consistent with wide-ranging gene dispersal by both wind and bats. Simulations in an Approximate Bayesian Computation framework suggested low nuSSR and cpDNA mutation rates but imprecise estimates of other demographic parameters, probably due to a substantial gene flow between the Lower Guinean gene pools. The decline of genetic diversity detected in some Gabonese populations could be a consequence of the relatively recent establishment of a closed canopy forest which may negatively affect M. excelsa's reproductive system. [less ▲]

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