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See detailGlucosamine sulphate in the treatment of knee osteoarthritis: cost-effectiveness comparison with paracetamol.
Scholtissen, S.; Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Neuprez, A. et al

in International Journal of Clinical Practice (2010), 64(6), 756-62

INTRODUCTION: The aim of this study was to explore the cost-effectiveness of glucosamine sulphate (GS) compared with paracetamol and placebo (PBO) in the treatment of knee osteoarthritis. For this purpose ... [more ▼]

INTRODUCTION: The aim of this study was to explore the cost-effectiveness of glucosamine sulphate (GS) compared with paracetamol and placebo (PBO) in the treatment of knee osteoarthritis. For this purpose, a 6-month time horizon and a health care perspective was used. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The cost and effectiveness data were derived from Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index data of the Glucosamine Unum In Die (once-a-day) Efficacy trial study by Herrero-Beaumont et al. Clinical effectiveness was converted into utility scores to allow for the computation of cost per quality-adjusted life year (QALY) For the three treatment arms Incremental Cost-Effectiveness Ratio were calculated and statistical uncertainty was explored using a bootstrap simulation. RESULTS: In terms of mean utility score at baseline, 3 and 6 months, no statistically significant difference was observed between the three groups. When considering the mean utility score changes from baseline to 3 and 6 months, no difference was observed in the first case but there was a statistically significant difference from baseline to 6 months with a p-value of 0.047. When comparing GS with paracetamol, the mean baseline incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) was dominant and the mean ICER after bootstrapping was -1376 euro/QALY indicating dominance (with 79% probability). When comparing GS with PBO, the mean baseline and after bootstrapping ICER were 3617.47 and 4285 euro/QALY, respectively. CONCLUSION: The results of the present cost-effectiveness analysis suggested that GS is a highly cost-effective therapy alternative compared with paracetamol and PBO to treat patients diagnosed with primary knee OA. [less ▲]

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See detailGlucosamine sulfate in the treatment of knee osteoarthritis: impact on health utility.
Scholtissen, S.; Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Hiligsmann, Mickaël ULg et al

in Osteoporosis International (2009, March), 20(Suppl.1), 149

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See detailCommentary: osteoarthritis of the knee and glucosamine
Altman, R. D.; Abramson, S.; Bruyère, Olivier ULg et al

in Osteoarthritis and Cartilage (2006), 14(10), 963-966

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See detailTotal joint replacement of hip or knee as an outcome measure for structure modifying trials in osteoarthritis
Altman, R. D.; Abadie, Eric ULg; Avouac, B. et al

in Osteoporosis International (2005, March), 16(Suppl.3), 10

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See detailTotal joint replacement of hip or knee as an outcome measure for structure modifying trials in osteoarthritis
Altman, R. D.; Abadie, Eric ULg; Avouac, B. et al

in Osteoarthritis and Cartilage (2005), 13(1), 13-19

Objective: The Group for the Respect of Ethics and Excellence in Science (GREES) organized a working group to assess the value of time to joint surgery as a potential therapeutic failure outcome criterion ... [more ▼]

Objective: The Group for the Respect of Ethics and Excellence in Science (GREES) organized a working group to assess the value of time to joint surgery as a potential therapeutic failure outcome criterion for osteoarthritis (OA) of the hip or knee in the assessment of potential structure modifying agents. Methods: PubMed was searched for manuscripts from 1976 to 2004. Relevant studies were discussed at a 1-day meeting. Results: There are no accepted guidelines for 'time to' and 'indications for' joint replacement surgery. A limited number of trials have examined joint replacement surgery within the study population. Several parameters, particularly joint space narrowing (interbone distance), correlate with surgical intervention. However, at the level of the knee, none of the parameters have positive predictive value for joint replacement surgery better than 30%. In contrast, lack of significant joint space narrowing has a strong negative predictive value for joint replacement surgery (> 90%), that remains after controlling for OA pain severity. Conclusion: At this time, GREES cannot recommend time to joint surgery as a primary endpoint of failure for structure modifying trials of hip or knee OA-as the parameter has sensitivity but lacks specificity. In contrast, in existing trials, a lack of progression of joint space narrowing has predictive value of > 90% for not having surgery. GREES suggests utilizing joint space narrowing (e.g., > 0.3-0.7 mm) combined with a lack of clinically relevant improvement in symptoms (e.g., greater than or equal to 20-25%) for 'failure' of a secondary outcome in structure modifying trials of the hip and knee. (C) 2004 OsteoArthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailTime dependent risk of gastrointestinal complications induced by non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug use: a consensus statement using a meta-analytic approach
Richy, F.; Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Ethgen, Olivier ULg et al

in Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases (2004), 63(7), 759-766

OBJECTIVES: To provide an updated document assessing the global, NSAID-specific, and time dependent risk of gastrointestinal (GI) complications through meta-analyses of high quality studies. METHODS: An ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVES: To provide an updated document assessing the global, NSAID-specific, and time dependent risk of gastrointestinal (GI) complications through meta-analyses of high quality studies. METHODS: An exhaustive systematic search was performed. Inclusion criteria were: RCT or controlled study, duration of 5 days at least, inactive control, assessment of minor or major NSAID adverse effects, publication range January 1985 to January 2003. The publications retrieved were assessed during a specifically dedicated WHO meeting including leading experts in all related fields. Statistics were performed conservatively. Meta-regression was performed by regressing NSAID adjusted estimates against study duration categories. RESULTS: Among RCT data, indolic derivates provided a significantly higher risk of GI complications related to NSAID use than for non-users: RR = 2.25 (1.00; 5.08) than did other compounds: naproxen: RR = 1.83 (1.25; 2.68); diclofenac: RR = 1.73 (1.21; 2.46); piroxicam: RR = 1.66 (1.14; 2.44); tenoxicam: RR = 1.43 (0.40; 5.14); meloxicam: RR = 1.24 (0.98; 1.56), and ibuprofen: RR = 1.19 (0.93; 1.54). Indometacin users had a maximum relative risk for complication at 14 days. The other compounds presented a better profile, with a maximum risk at 50 days. Significant additional risk factors included age, dose, and underlying disease. The controlled cohort studies provided higher estimates: RR = 2.22 (1.7; 2.9). Publication bias testing was significant, towards a selective publication of deleterious effects of NSAIDs from small sized studies. CONCLUSION: This meta-analysis characterised the "compound" and "time" aspects of the GI toxicity of non-selective NSAIDs. The risk/benefit ratio of such compounds should thus be carefully and individually evaluated at the start of long term treatment. [less ▲]

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See detailDo new methods of investigation allow faster assessment of drugs efficacy in osteoarthritis?
Abadie, Eric ULg; Avouac, B.; Bouvenot, G. et al

in Osteoporosis International (2003, November), 14(Suppl. 7), 2

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