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See detailStudy of the induced systemic resistance of plants: molecular aspects of the interaction between plant cells and amphiphilic elicitors produced by non-pathogenic rhizobacteria
Henry, Guillaume ULg

Doctoral thesis (2013)

Some non pathogenic rhizobacteria could locally interact with plants, leading to the stimulation of a primed protection state in the host plant. Upon subsequent pathogen attack, this priming state allows ... [more ▼]

Some non pathogenic rhizobacteria could locally interact with plants, leading to the stimulation of a primed protection state in the host plant. Upon subsequent pathogen attack, this priming state allows an accelerated activation of defense responses extending to all organs of the plant. Fundamental as well as applied research about this induced systemic resistance (ISR) has been tremendously boosted in the past decades, driven by its evident potential for biological control of plant diseases in agriculture. However very little information is available about molecular mechanisms governing the recognition by plant cells of ISR-specific elicitors. Various compounds retaining the ability to elicit ISR have been isolated, among which the recently emerged class of biosurfactants. We conducted the present thesis work with the scope to highlight how such amphiphilic compounds are perceived at the plant cell surface to stimulate the systemic plant immune system. In the first part, the strain B. amyloliquefaciens was selected out of other isolates for its technological traits and previously characterized ISR activity. We demonstrated that surfactin is the most competent cyclic lipopeptide (cLP) family produced by this strain to confer ISR on the selected plant model, tobacco. In order to improve our knowledge about the mechanism governing the perception of this biosurfactant at the plant cell surface, we have combined various approaches such as structure/activity (stimulation of the defense-related oxidative burst) relationship, insertion kinetics within membranes of tobacco cultured cells and thermodynamic determination of binding parameters on various model membranes via isothermal titration calorimetry. Our data indicate that surfactin perception relies on a lipid-driven process which is quite uncommon regarding the typical proteic receptor-mediated recognition of molecular patterns governing the plant basal immunity. We then demonstrate that cLPs induce some enrichment or depletion into specific lipid platforms of different proteins. We hypothesize that it may be: (1) the direct consequence of the generation of insertion sites for some proteins in the entire plasma membrane due to specific cLP segregation at lipid phase interfaces; or (2) result from the indirect adjustment of lipid-modifying enzymes activities through an induced rearrangement of the plasma membrane lipid organization. It reinforces the current hypothesis of a role for lipid microdomains-driven lateral compartmentalization in plant cell signaling. The lipid bilayer of target cells could now be considered as the focal point of cLPs perception from where start cellular responses. As they display an original mechanism of action, the class of amphiphilic ISR elicitors to which they belong become more attractive than ever for further development of innovative biopesticides. [less ▲]

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See detailThe role of surfactins in plant immunization by Bacilli
Cawoy, Hélène ULg; Henry, Guillaume ULg; Jourdan, Emmanuel ULg et al

Conference (2011, April)

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See detailInsights into the plant defense mechanisms induced by Bacillus lipopeptides.
Ongena, Marc ULg; Henry, Guillaume ULg; Adam, Akram et al

Poster (2009, July)

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See detailBacillus-based biocontrol of Fusarium disease on tomato cultures in Burundi
Nihorimbere, Venant; Ongena, Marc ULg; Cawoy, Hélène ULg et al

Poster (2009, May 19)

Detailed reference viewed: 21 (4 ULg)